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Newport Beach


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Balboa Island Bridge Deck Repair to Begin November 28

Community Members: 

Please prepare for possible traffic delays on the Balboa Island Bridge this week due to maintenance work.

Starting Monday, Nov. 28, bridge traffic will be reduced to one lane controlled by flaggers.

Working hours are 7 a.m.-5 p.m. The repairs are expected to be completed by Friday, Dec. 2.

September 2022 Treasury Report Now Available

The September 2022 Treasury Report is available on the city’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/treasury.

As of September, the city’s investment portfolio totaled $345.5 million when measured at amortized cost. The current market value of the city’s portfolio of $331.8 million incorporates price fluctuations due to the changing interest rate environment that are typically irrelevant since the city generally holds its securities to maturity and receives the full principal value at that time.

The city’s Liquidity Portfolio is sized to meet the city’s cash flow needs over the next 12 months. Approximately $42.5 million or 12% of the portfolio was invested in liquid investments available for day-to-day operating expenses and the costs associated with ongoing construction projects.

An additional $11.9 million or 3% of the overall portfolio was invested in a portfolio of securities with targeted short-term maturities, which earns a higher yield than the city’s more liquid investments. The city utilizes these investments with targeted maturities to meet cash flow needs at times when the balance of more liquid investments declines due to the seasonality of revenue receipts throughout the year.

Operation Christmas

Collecting new toys, DVDs & sports equipment now through 12 p.m. on December 23 at all public city facilities.

Donation drop off locations include Civic Center, OASIS Senior Center, Newport Coast Community Center, Marina Park Community Center, Newport Beach libraries, Newport Beach fire stations and police department.

On the Agenda: City Council Meeting for November 29

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 29. Items of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda and reports can be viewed here

A study session will begin at 4 p.m. Agenda items include:

–Potential traffic calming options for Tustin Avenue. As a follow-up to the June 28 City Council meeting, staff will provide more information related to potential traffic calming options for Tustin Avenue. 

The regular meeting will begin at 5:30 p.m. Agenda items include:

–Extension of fee waivers for Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) permits. The council will consider extending the temporary waiver of city building construction permit and plan check fees related to the development of ADUs and Junior Accessory Dwelling Units (JADUs). The council previously approved the fee waivers in April to help meet state-mandated housing goals. The fee waiver would complement other city programs to promote and facilitate ADU development, including website enhancements and pre-approved plans that will be available in early 2023. 

An agreement between the City of Newport Beach and the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS). FONBAS has funded and constructed a new animal care and shelter facility at 20282 Riverside Drive and proposes to donate the property and improvements to the city to operate its municipal animal control services and animal shelter. 

A contract award for construction of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge, park expansion and parking lot at Superior Avenue. The council will consider awarding a $10.5 million contract to Reyes Construction, Inc. to build a new pedestrian/bicycle bridge across Superior Avenue, expand the park area at Sunset View Park, and construct a new, larger parking lot at the intersection of Superior Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway. 

A new staff position to support Police Department retention and recruitment. The Council will consider adding a human resources specialist position to the Human Resources Department to help address challenges related to recruiting and retaining city police officers.

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, Nov. 29

City Council Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 4 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 2

Breakfast with Santa: 2022

Newport Coast Community Center

6401 San Joaquin Hills Road – 9:30-11 a.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, Nov. 25 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


From Mother Nature to 100-ft. yachts

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Sitting high atop Pelican Hill, residents sip wine and gaze down upon the outline of Newport Harbor. Laying silent, while sparkling like an expensive piece of jewelry, the harbor is one of the most modern and well-designed small boat harbors in the world. Residents rarely think about how it came to be.   

For eternities, natural forces shaped this beautiful haven akin to the love of a doting parent. The last 172 years, with man’s interloping, today’s vibrant harbor was created. Atop the bay’s six main channels and 80 acres of turning basins, sit 10,000 recreational vessels, four major marinas and an incalculable number of boat slips, moorings and privately stored vessels. Residents and millions of tourists witness holiday parades, boat regattas and canoe and shell races while sightseeing the bay’s calm waters. Everyone enjoys the popular “harbor cruise,” whether on a Duffy, dinghy, stand-up paddle board, or expensive yacht. This 5 mph “slow go” is a longstanding tradition, as friends imbibe and tell stories highlighting the city. A credo held since childhood reads: “Newport Harbor NEVER changes, but the view is different each and every day.” 

From Mother Nature CdM aerial

Courtesy of Orange County Archives

Aerial view of Corona del Mar, 1930

Geologically, the bay can be traced to three episodes of subduction of a western oceanic plate sliding up against a continental plate. Over millions of years, land bound geological dynamics helped sculpt the coastline with the artistic precision of Michelangelo. Water runoff from the mountains via the Santa Ana River, San Diego Creek, Santa Ana-Delhi Channel, Bonita Creek and Big Canyon Wash meandered through the mesa. Thick with sediment, these silt-laden streams dug their way to the sea. This allowed more and more sand to end up at the local beaches. It is well known that the Santa Ana river flowed through the north arm of Newport Harbor, shaping the harbor and creating sand islands.  However, prior to 1825, the Santa Ana River discharged further north into Alamitos Bay, leaving Newport Harbor a stagnant swamp, dependent upon ocean waves, Back Bay streams and tides to change its landscape. 

In the 30 years after the Santa Ana River shifted south, Orange County suffered a series of dramatic floods adding to the Balboa Peninsula. The biggest flood in 1861 accelerated growth of the peninsula to its present location. By the 1870s, the inner waters were protected from the ocean, allowing vessel access.  As population inland grew, steamers brought commerce to the area. McFadden’s operation established the harbor as a viable, yet dangerous, place to conduct trade. Eventually, McFadden’s Landing moved to an oceanfront location surrounding 22nd Street.

In 1906, Albert Hermes hand carried a request for incorporation for the blue-collar town. With a vote of 42 to 12, Newport Beach was officially a pintsized city.  The harbor now had a government to “protect and grow it.” Through the rest of the 20th and 21st centuries, Newport Beach’s population grew from 445 in 1910 to 85,780 in 2020, creating sweeping changes to the bay and tidelands areas.

The extremely dangerous nature of the harbor entrance was an early concern. In 1917, 12.82 acres of land near the tip of the peninsula was bought to improve the harbor entrance. The Wm. Ledbetter Co. was awarded the contract to set the rock. The cost was $1.46 per ton for the first 40,000 tons and $.74 thereafter. On Admissions Day 1917, the whole town showed up to celebrate the first rock being laid. 

Due to drownings and shipwrecks, it became evident that more work was needed. In 1919, the old barkentine Fremont made headlines by running aground returning from a motion picture shoot. The ship was broken up with dynamite and its name used as a rallying cry for a safer entrance. 

Because both state and federal governments transferred tidelands to coastal cities in 1919, Newport Beach gained ownership of said lands. Over the years, struggles evolved regarding tidelands ownership. With the development of Lido Isle, the Orange County Harbor Landowners Association was formed to represent waterfront owners affected by tidelands uncertainty. 

Major improvements to the harbor took place in 1934, 1935 and 1936. This included the dredging of 3,000 feet in length and 500 feet in width creating the main channel fronting Balboa and Balboa Island. This work also included deepening two turning-basins of 32 acres west of Lido Isle and 45 acres east of Lido Isle. The city also extended the west jetty 675 feet to a total length of 1,830 feet and placed a stone revetment along the concrete on the Corina del Mar side. 

During this project, 8,500,000 cubic yards of sand, 20,000 cubic yards of ledge rock and 60,000 cubic yards of boulders were removed from the harbor floor. One million cubic yards of sand was deposited on “swamp” lands and 7,500,000 cubic yards were used to widen the beaches some 275 feet. Total expenditures came to $2,281,802.

From Mother Nature shell races

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Courtesy of Orange County Archives

Shell races, circa 1950

Fast forward to today. Similar work to that done in the 1930s is now the center of a controversy dealing with burying toxic soils in the harbor. Over many decades, dredgers have built islands, groomed channels and opened up turning basins. As late as 2012, 600,000 cubic yards of contaminated soils were dumped offshore. 

From Mother Nature barge

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Photo by Duncan Forgey

Barge of toxic soils moved to ocean dump, 2012

Due to the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and/or mercury levels in today’s sand, the offshore option is not available. The city’s plan, recently passed by the Coastal Commission 6-0 with one abstention, is to fit 156,900 cubic yards of sediment into a CAD (confined aquatic disposal) site. The site will be 590 feet by 590 feet and 46 feet deep. It will be capped with clean material. This CAD site is located in the 45-acre turning basin and yacht anchorage between Bay Island and the east end of Lido Isle. 

Sides have lined up with most residents understanding one common truth.   Newport Harbor is a living, breathing and changing entity. If left alone, it will evolve like any other living organism. Because moving water, toxins, sediment and silt move into the bay causing pollution, there is a threat to wildlife and eventually humans. 

From Mother Nature electric boats

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Photo by Duncan Forgey

A line of electric boats at the ready for a harbor cruise

Mankind has “shipshaped” Newport Harbor into exactly what the residents want. Machines, boats, cars, paints, pesticides and interior runoff have created the need for harbor maintenance. The city says it is now time to repair and restore the bay for the future. The cost will fall upon the backs of the city and its taxpayers, alongside any state or federal monies that can be garnered. 

With recent Coastal Commission approval, the City Council appears to be moving forward. There are side discussions about private citizens coming forth with extra money to stem the costs of trucking the soils elsewhere, thus alleviating the need for a CAP. But as of today, it appears the logical answer is to bury the affected soil. 

Concerned waterfront owners and environmentalists ask about the unperceived risks of disturbing and moving the toxins. Will fish, birds, water quality and the bay floor be harmed? And what about the thousands of sailing and boating activities that take place in the basin over the projected year-long project? Brad Avery, a city councilmember and avid user of the bay, believes it is the appropriate time to make the harbor right for the future of Newport Beach.   

From Mother Nature yacht

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Photo by Duncan Forgey

The 112-ft. “Ubiquitous” cruising Newport Harbor

Residents, however, cannot be blinded by the flotilla of high-priced yachts and glorious bayfront residences and must help the city come up with the right solution. Newport’s bay has been and, hopefully, will always be the major factor that distinguishes Newport Beach from anywhere else. 

From Mother Nature Michigan

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Photo by Duncan Forgey

The “Michigan” in the turning basin during the Old Glory Boat Parade on the Fourth of July 

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Duncan Forgey, long-time resident, photographer and historian of Newport Beach, makes his home on Kaua’i and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport. His first novel “Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale,” which received a recommendation by Kirkus Reviews, is available through his website – www.DuncanForgey.com. He would love to hear from you.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back Auto Ferry copy

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Auto Ferry

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond: Arched Rock Beach

Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond Arched Rock Beach.jpg 11.29

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Artwork by Don Krotee

Throughout the world there are ocean edges crashing on rock. This location is within Sonoma’s Park system in Sonoma County, near Bodega Bay. The painting accentuates the foreground to promote the drama of the spray, using the white of the paper, but the dramatic spray is diluted viscous gouache and painted entirely in the artist’s studio. It is painted on Fabriano #140 quarter sheet, 15” x 20”. The work was part of an online challenge making 30 paintings in 30 days, last June, called the 30 x 30 painting challenge. 

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Don Krotee is an architect and artist in Corona del Mar. He is a member of the 2000 General Plan Advisory Committee, Corona del Mar Residents Association member, the founder of Newport Heights Improvement Association and a board member of SPON. Krotee is a sailor and outdoorsman who has been drawing and painting from an early age. He provides “Stu News” color prints of his original drawings and paintings from iconic Newport Beach and around the world.


Stahrs and Woolseys join Wittes with names on new library lecture hall complex

Newport Beach Public Library Foundation (NBPLF) has received a commitment from Elizabeth Stahr for a generous contribution to name the renovated and expanded courtyard of the Newport Beach Public Library Lecture Hall, now named Witte Hall. The courtyard will be the Stahr Courtyard and will be recognized as such with a multi-layered sign panel in the courtyard.

The foundation has also received a commitment from Roy B. Woolsey to name the lobby of Witte Hall in honor of his parents, Louise and Roy Woolsey. The lobby will be named the Louise and Roy Woolsey Memorial Lobby with a multi-layered signage on the lobby wall.

The Newport Beach City Council approved the Naming Rights Agreements at its council meeting earlier this month on November 15. 

Stahrs and Woolseys lecture hall

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library Foundation

A rendering of the planned Newport Beach Public Library Lecture Hall, now named Witte Hall

Witte Hall will be nearly 10,000 square feet, technologically advanced, with tiered seating for 299 guests. Located next to the Central Library, the Witte Hall will also include an expanded courtyard, now the Stahr Courtyard, for pre- and post-events and a reconfiguration of the library parking lot. 

Elizabeth Stahr and her late husband, John Stahr, were the driving force behind the construction of the Central Library which opened in 1994. The Central Library children’s area is named the Stahr Children’s Room in honor of their vision and leadership. The Stahrs were also the founders of the NBPLF and Elizabeth has been a continuing guiding light for the foundation. Her son, Walter Stahr, an attorney and acclaimed biographer, now serves on the board of the foundation.

“My late husband John and I were proud, 30 years ago now, to raise the money to build the Newport Beach Central Library,” said Elizabeth. “Although John is no longer with us, I am honored to continue that tradition, in our joint names, to help build the new lecture hall.” 

Louise and Roy Woolsey were longtime residents of Newport Beach, and both were very active in civic and community organizations. Louise was a strong supporter of libraries, both the Newport Beach Public Library and the UCI Library. Roy was senior attorney in the Woolsey, Angelo and Thatcher law firm. An avid sailor, he was a former Commodore of the Lido Isle Yacht Club, establishing the Roy Woolsey Regatta at the Lido Isle Yacht Club that is still being held. Roy passed away in 2007 and Louise in 2015. 

“My parents were both very philanthropic; my father, a long-time member of the Newport Beach Sunrise Rotary Club, and my mother, active in a number of charities, including supporting the Newport Beach Library, where the names “Louise and Roy Woolsey” appear on the wall at the Crean Mariners Branch Library,” said son Roy. “Given that their lives in Newport Beach were so full of happiness and success, I felt they should have a legacy here. When the opportunity arose to name the lobby of the new Library Lecture Hall in their memory, it seemed a natural and appropriate legacy given their interest in the library and philanthropy.” 

The City of Newport Beach and the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation have entered into an agreement in which the city will be contributing half of the cost of construction of the hall and the foundation will fundraise for the remainder. It is anticipated that the groundbreaking for the new hall will be in 2023 with the grand opening in 2024. 

Naming opportunities are still available for the Library Lecture Hall, now Witte Hall. Major donors will have permanent recognition on the Donor Wall in the Louise and Roy Woolsey Memorial Lobby at Witte Hall and at grand opening events. 

For more information, contact Jerold D Kappel, chief executive officer of the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation at 949.717.3890, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


School Notes

NMUSD accepting general ed students from surrounding districts into Special Education Preschool Programs

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) is now accepting general education students from neighboring school districts to participate in their inclusive Special Education Preschool Programs.

Students will learn side-by-side with their same-aged peers in structured, caring preschool classrooms. The programs prepare young learners for success in kindergarten, as they participate in small and large group classroom settings and cooperative play activities.

The focus is on language and early literacy skills, including phonological awareness and alphabet knowledge; and social and emotional independence, fostered through direct teaching and cooperative play.

The program is four hours per day, with hours varying based on the school location. Costs for students attending Pomona Elementary for five half-days per week (M-F) will be $250/month. Five half-days at other schools will be $350/month, while those attending Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays will pay $200/month.

Parents/guardians are invited to participate in a monthly play-based observation, which includes a 30-40 minute observation of their child’s play, social and language skills and classroom readiness. The session includes a circle time, small group activity and free play.


High school young men’s group visits elementary students bringing gifts and answers

During this season of Thanksgiving, it was all about giving for a group of local young men from the Newport Mesa Chapter of National League of Young Men (NLYM). Their mission was to assemble and donate pencil boxes stuffed full of school supplies and deliver them to local after-school programs by way of Project Kids Connect. In total, they assembled and delivered 295 pencil boxes to students in need.

Over the course of the last two weeks, the highschoolers visited both Whittier Elementary and Wilson Elementary schools to drop off the supplies and interact with the students at Project Kids Connect. 

Although this is a yearly event for NLYM to drop off their school supply donations, the interactions with the elementary students had been on hold for the past three years due to COVID. 

The excitement was palpable, both from the elementary students and the high school young men, who engaged in a brief Q&A before grabbing the sports equipment and heading for the field to play soccer and pass the football together.

High school young men's group

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of NLYM

Members of the Newport Mesa Chapter of National League of Young Men stand before elementary students answering questions from their inquiring minds

Carmen Bravo de la Cruz, a leader of Project Kids Connect, prompted the students for a Q&A session with the teens and their questions ranged from, “Is high school hard?” to “What’s your favorite animal?” and “Why do you like to play water polo?” and the young men answered with encouraging responses, eliciting a few giggles from the kids as well.

On his way back to the classroom, one of the young boys asked his teacher, “When are they coming back?” 

The parent organizers from NLYM – Allison Tift, Dena Baron, Christin Gurka, Jill Bertea and Anna Tester – are grateful for the partnership with NMUSD and Project Kids Connect, and are still debating if the high school young men or the elementary students had more fun. 

It was a successful event from start to finish, and the young men delivered the true meaning of this Thanksgiving and holiday season – in Spanish, “Día de Acción de Gracias” – bringing joy to elementary kids through their actions of thanks.

NLYM is a non-profit organization for young men in grades 9-12. This structured program for mothers and their sons promotes the development of young men into community leaders through leadership involvement, charitable and community service, cultural experiences and protocol education.

For more information, visit the NLYM website at www.nationalleagueofyoungmen.org/newport-mesa/.


Consumer service on your terms with the Cox app

For consumers, life moves fast, and we often don’t have the time to track down the information or support we need to maximize our services. When it comes to managing your Cox account and connection, the Cox app puts you in the driver’s seat.

With a simple download of the Cox app to your smart device, you’ll gain access to the tools you need to manage your Cox services and account effortlessly. Let’s walk through a few of the app’s handy benefits:

Tech Support: Access real-time tech support the way you want it. Read Cox support forums for the answer you need, or chat with a customer service agent any time, 24/7. Check out the app’s Support tab to read helpful articles, find a Cox store near you, or chat with us right from the app.

The app’s Smart Help feature automatically performs regular network service checks, looking for issues with your internet, TV or phone services. If there are disruptions to your services, you’ll see a message right on your dashboard. Plus, enable app notifications to be the first to get updates relevant to your area. (Text alerts are available, too.)

Consumer service bicyclist

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Courtesy of Cox Communications

Download the Cox app to your smart device and gain access to the tools you need to manage your Cox services and account effortlessly

Account & Billing: You don’t need to wait on hold or stand in line to ask a basic question or accomplish a simple billing task. With the Cox app, those days are in the rearview mirror.

Use the app to view and pay your bill, check data usage details, set up or cancel automatic payments, see up to 18 months of previous bills and change billing preferences (even move your Cox service) – all without needing to make a phone call, wait on hold or speak with an agent. It’s a beautiful thing!

Account: Explore the benefits and features of all your Cox-connected services in one place. My Services shows the details of your Cox broadband home internet, Contour TV, phone and Homelife service plans and connects you easily to other Cox apps.

Other benefits? Glad you asked. You can also enable Face ID for a seamless login experience. Plus, opt for paperless billing, change your language preference or add alternate account contacts.

It’s never been easier to manage your Cox account. Use the Cox app – with all your account services information and preferences in one secure place – and you’ll save precious time and energy (and paper!) for other more important life “stuff.”

Download the Cox app today in the App Store or Google Play for customer service on your terms, delivered right to your fingertips – as it should be. For more information, visit www.cox.com.

This is paid content by Cox Communications. Cox provides residents in the Newport Beach area with digital cable television, telecommunications and Home Automation services. Cox also provides scholarships to local high school students in its service area through its Cox Cares Foundation. For more information, visit www.cox.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

In the aftermath of Evelyn Hart’s passing, another Newport Beach doyenne is found to have quietly preceded her

TJ headshot AugMany readers expressed sadness upon hearing of the passing of Evelyn Hart last week.

However, it was one letter that included the mention of another passing that seemed to escape the news back in September. Dayna Pettit, a former Newport Beach Citizen of the Year (2001), with a longtime local real estate career, passed away following a lengthy illness on September 8, 2022 at the age of 84.

Dayna Ruth Marsh Pettit was born Aug. 29, 1938, spending her early years in St. Cloud, Minn. Following her death, she was buried there next to her parents before a small service. 

Her twin sister Donna preceded her in death several years ago, and Donna's grown children live there. Donna and Dayna also had two adopted siblings. 

The letter writer to Stu News wished to remain anonymous but did perfectly refer to Dayna as another “doyenne” – a woman who is the most respected or prominent person in a particular field.

Dayna certainly fit that bill.

Dayna, and now Evelyn, two women instrumental in Newport Beach’s rich history have left their legacy.

• • •

So, if December was the month you were going to start attending the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce’s WAKE UP! Newport breakfast program and hear from their exciting speaker, relax…and sleep in.

The WAKE UP! Newport program has been postponed until January 5, 2023. We’ll get back with more details as they develop.

• • •

Speaking of the Chamber, their Online Auction supporting the Christmas Boat Parade, the biggest means of support, will go live online at the end of the week.

If you like to eat out, stay at nice places and do fun things, then this auction is for YOU! They’re expecting some $50,000+ in items for the taking.

Keep an eye on www.ChristmasBoatParade.com/auction for the actual opening.

• • •

And, if you haven’t done so yet, sign-ups are almost sold out for the 2022 Mayor’s Reception and Chamber Volunteer Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13, beginning at 6 p.m. at Back Bay Bistro at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort.

There’s a lot to celebrate: first and foremost are the four new members of the Newport Beach City Council, and then, of course, will be the new mayor and mayor pro tem.

The community will also say goodbye to outgoing Mayor and eight-year councilmember Kevin Muldoon

The Chamber also has some of their business to complete that evening, presenting their Silver Anchor awards, naming the Ambassador of the Year and the Navigate Young Professional of the Year.

The $50 cost covers some delicious food, including hors d’oeuvres, steak and turkey carving stations, salmon, pasta, desserts and a no-host bar.

Reservations are required. Go here to sign up

• • •

Christmas has arrived at the Orange County Fair and Events Center and is presenting the exciting Winter Fest OC, which runs through January 1, 2023. 

Here’s what you’ll find...the grounds have been transformed “into a winter wonderland with oversized holiday décor, more than a million lights and endless opportunities for memory-making.”

Some of the favorites are a North Pole Journey, ice skating under the stars, a 150-ft.-long ice tubing slide, a snowboard simulator, carnival thrills, food and drinks, a holiday market and so much more.

To buy tickets, go here.

And, right here at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is their 32nd Annual Lighting of the Bay now through New Year’s Day. The trees, seemingly floating on the bay’s waters are beautifully lit and reflecting off the smooth waters below to add to the beauty.

Also at the Dunes, the Holiday Tree Lot is open from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. now through December 24. They offer a hand-picked selection of farm-fresh trees from Oregon. Varieties include Noble, Nordmann, Natural and Douglas. In addition to their weekly deliveries of fresh trees, they have wreaths and garlands. The lot is open until trees are sold out.

• • •

If you feel like adopting a family and bringing holiday joy to others, here’s an idea: The 53rd Annual Adopt A Family Program takes place at the OC Fair & Event Center on December 18-19.

Those interested can go to https://shareourselves.roonga.com and explore the Share Our Selves Adopt a Family program. There, you can self-select a family to adopt.

Here’s what’s involved: purchase two new gifts per child (adults optional) or present two new gift cards with a $25 minimum value, and/or a $25 grocery gift card per family member. 

Gifts must be dropped off at the OC Fair & Event Center located at 88 Fair Drive in Costa Mesa.

For questions, contact Josephine Colindres, their community programs manager, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Remember what they told us as kids, it’s better to give than to receive. I’ll be honest, though, I never really understood or was able to grasp that as a youngster.

• • •

And, finally, it’s hard to imagine that the election took place three weeks ago today, and still, as of last night, there were 6,688 ballots waiting to be counted. Now, granted, these ballots won’t impact our life, but really, with so much technology available these days, should we really be doing this three weeks later?

And just imagine what it’s been like for incumbent Costa Mesa City Councilmember Andrea Marr. Her lead over challenger John Thomas Patton is 80 votes at the close of counting last evening.

It gets worse in the city just to our north. Costa Mesa also has a ballot initiative, Measure K, that claims “to revitalize commercial and industrial areas and protest residential neighborhoods.” The count last night was No – 16,426 votes, Yes – 16,422. 

If you struggle at math, let me help you out, that’s four votes. Next time someone says your vote doesn’t mean anything, think again.

I checked in with my friend, Costa Mesa Mayor John Stephens, who recently won reelection fairly easily over former State Senator John Moorlach, for his take on the Measure and what he sees happening. 

First off, John (Stephens) was a “yes” vote. He and a group of supporters are in the process of “curing” votes. That’s where ballots that have been rejected for a variety of reasons (unsigned, signature doesn’t match, etc.) are then made public and now the “Yes” side begins working to correct those shortfalls and get enough of them corrected and thus counted to push the Measure over. 

Sounds like a recount or court challenge is in Costa Mesa’s future.


A Celtic Christmas comes to Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach with Tin Box Theatricals

A Celtic Christmas tin box

Courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Come enjoy an evening of song, humor, stories and holiday traditions of the British Isles including a lively rendition of Dylan Thomas’ short story, “A Child’s Christmas in Wales,” on Thursday, Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach. Cost: Museum members, $20; Non-members, $25. RSVP to 949.675.3952, or visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org/events. Purchase tickets here. Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach is located at 201B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. Pictured: Tin Box Theatricals.


You Must Remember This: Running “my” kind of campaign 

By NANCY GARDNER

Once upon a time, O Dearly Beloved – this is the start of many a Just So story by Rudyard Kipling in which he explains how all sorts of odd things came to be: how the elephant got its trunk, the camel its hump, the leopard its spots. I have nothing quite so unusual to explain, but…

Once upon a time, O Dearly Beloved, you could run for Newport Beach City Council and spend less than $25,000. I can see all the heads nodding. Yes, of course, back in the 1940s or ‘50s when we were so much smaller and the dollar was worth less and…

How about 2006?

It is strange to think that in less than 20 years we have gone from campaigns costing tens of thousands of dollars to a situation where something like a million dollars was raised/spent on the District 1 seat. In that time, we have also gone from candidates espousing their many virtues to smears and misstatements – enthusiastically abetted by various PACs. 2006 might as well be 1940 as things have changed so much, but let me take you back to how at least one campaign was run in the “olden” days. (Spoiler alert: I won!).

I was persuaded to run for council by Debra Allen when she assured me that contrary to my fears, there was really very little social aspect to the job of councilmember (a blatant lie for which she not only never apologized, but actually laughed when she saw me at events I would never have attended if I hadn’t been on council). A big difference from today is that you could run a campaign – and I did – without a professional campaign manager. That was probably a big money saver, but that’s not why I did it. The idea of a campaign manager made me uncomfortable. I was the one who, if elected, would serve. The voters should know what they were getting, but if I was parroting words written for me by some professional, then that was not me who was being elected but an artificial version of me (which some people might have preferred, admittedly), so I wrote all my campaign material. If I were elected, people would have a good idea of what they were getting. If I lost – I lost as myself. Also, the campaign would be about me, not my opponent. It would be a positive, not a negative campaign.

I don’t know if anybody would run their own campaign today. So much money is being spent, it probably gives a certain comfort to have a pro managing it. I would hope a positive campaign is still viable, although after this last election with its smears and misrepresentations and the like it is a challenge, particularly if you’ve got that pro whispering in your ear that you have to go negative.  However, one thing gives me hope in that regard.

I had been co-chair of the General Plan Advisory Committee and so at the same time I was running for council I was also campaigning for the passage of the plan which had to be approved by voters. The person running that campaign asked me if I would sign a letter supporting passage of the plan, a letter he would write. I declined, but said that I would write my own letter if he liked. Great. I wrote it and sent it to him, and he freaked out. In the letter I said something to the effect of “Make no mistake, there is growth in this plan.” Growth was considered the third rail. Nobody wanted to mention the word. Any mention of the “g” word was assumed to doom the General Plan’s passage, so he wanted to remove that line. Fine, but he could also remove my signature. My name, my message. He must have run out of other people to ask, so with the greatest reluctance and trepidation he sent my letter out as I had written it. Later he told me my letter got a very positive response. The lesson I took from that was not that I was the next Hemingway when it came to letter writing. It was that people are smart, they know when you’re trying to snow them, and they can handle and may actually appreciate frankness and honesty.

Will that approach still get through in today’s meaner world? Call me Pollyanna, but I think so. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Take Five: Meet Duncan Forgey, Stu News contributor and author of Flyin’ Kai

By AMY SENK

This fall, it came to my attention that one of my Stu News colleagues had a newly published book, and that book was getting stellar reviews. Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale tells the story of a pelican that felt constrained by daily life, so it flew from his Anacapa Island home to the mainland seeking magic, but ultimately witnessed damage that humans have inflicted onto nature. I read up on Forgey and learned he is a sixth-generation Californian who worked in sales, business and real estate management and education along with writing columns and books, and that he lived throughout California before making Hawaii his home. I reached out to him to find out more.

Take Five Duncan Forgey

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Courtesy of Duncan Forgey

Duncan Forgey relaxing in the Marquesas Islands

Q: When did you get the idea to write Flyin’ Kai and what was your process to go from an idea to having a published and well-reviewed book?

A: Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale was written by a 20-year-old USC history major in 1969. The source of inspiration came from the philosophy of the 1960s, plus a highly popular book of the time, Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach. The characters, plotline and environmental emphasis were created by this idealistic college student with the intent to publish it right away. That student was me. For 53 years, I carried Flyin Kai: A Pelican’s Tale, working on it through three professions in different parts of the country. During that period, I experienced numerous writer’s classes, tutors, conferences and met professionals in an attempt to finish the book. I amended and rewrote the story, time and time again. While on Kaua’i, I updated the language, names and attitudes of the characters to correspond with a more contemporary audience. Even after several writing coaches and three editors, there was still countless hours of self-doubt. Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale was finished at age 71 and submitted to publishers. It was only then that I realized that there were two authors of the book. One, an idealistic college student and the other a wise old man with experience. Flyin’ Kai is appealing to a wide range of readers, from 12 to 80 years old, because of this collaboration of the young and the old.   

Q: Your online bio says you are a “thalassophile” and have a huge interest in the environment. How have you gotten educated and involved in ecological issues?

A: I was blessed to be a child of the ocean – a thalassophile, or lover of the sea. One of my earliest memories is looking at the Pacific Ocean with my great aunt in the early 1950s. Everything about the Pacific has excited, scared and intrigued me from that day forth. My several attempts to move away from the ocean left me incomplete. Add to that the absolute joy of experiencing the Pacific Ocean and Newport Beach’s natural boat harbor allowing us a total sea experience. Surfing, sailing, fishing, swimming and exploring the largest body of water on the planet is the milieu for this book. I have dedicated it to the oceans of the world – “Remember, Only You Can Save the Seas.” My entire youth was spent in Newport Beach. It was a time when hunting and fishing were not to feed the family. Our number of kills and the size of our conquests were extremely important for a youngster transitioning into adulthood. The lives of nature were not relevant.  At age 8, I shot at and accidently hit a beautiful red tail hawk cruising high in the sky. This kill created an immediate sense of guilt because it was so senseless. In my teens, I fished with my Newport Harbor High School buddy on his father’s boat. A group of us set out to catch marlin and become a man. That day, I was the only one that hooked up. Therefore, it was my chore to reel the fish. After a moderate fight, the marlin turned out to be a young mako shark. I pulled it aboard, and the 19-year-old skipper handed me a baseball bat with a large nail protruding from it. Kill it, kill it!” my friends chanted, and proceeded to do so. As I hit the shark over and over, its eyes stared into mine, as if to say, “This is not a fair fight – Let’s take it overboard.” That same feeling of guilt hit me for a second time. When I stopped hunting and fishing, other species – dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, turkey and even an alligator taught me a key lesson. If one looks into their eyes, you can see their soul. Nature’s critters and lifeforms come from a life source shared by humans. 

Take Five Duncan Forgey book cover

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Duncan Forgey’s “Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale” appeals to a wide range of readers, from 12 to 80 years old, because of the collaboration of the young and the old

Q: When did you move to Hawaii, and what are the big differences in your life in Hawaii compared to Newport Beach?

A: Living in California, I witnessed the disappearance of some of the most beautiful lands and creatures on the planet. As kids, we celebrated great numbers of sparrows returning to San Juan Mission and thousands of monarch butterflies traveling through town on migrations. We witnessed road runners in the Back Bay, burrowing and barn owls and desert tortoises within a half day’s drive. While at Horace Ensign, we even rowed a boat into the turning basin in order to get a close look at a killer whale in Newport Harbor. We loved the Catalina Island Channel because it was one of the most fertile breeding grounds in the world. We knew intimately exciting species of birds, insects and critters, no longer living in the OC. It was difficult to leave California after six generations of my family being there. But time had passed me by, and I thought there may be some place different. For me, it is Kaua’i, Hawaii. On my latest promotional tour to Newport Beach, I had a blast. Searching out dear friends and introducing them to Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale was a fabulous time because I miss them.

Q: Are you working on your next book? 

A: My second book was started decades ago by that same young writer. It is a fictional novel tracing SoCal and Newport life from the days of the Native Americans to the present. There is also a third book that is a compilation of articles written for Stu News Newport, Orange County Register, L.A. Times and Coast Magazine. This book follows local neighborhoods and lifestyles through articles and photography. 

Q: What’s been your favorite review, and what advice do you have for an aspiring author?

A: Of all my reviews; I am thankful for the Kirkus Review, which is one of the most prestigious in the industry. But my favorite reviews come from a wide range of readers, ages 12 to 80. It excites me to hear them use words like enjoyable, profound and fun when describing the book. In these days of dark and dystopian books, Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale walks softly, but carries a very big stick. Currently, Kirkus Reviews is working with me to get Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale ready for Christmas. Being a new author, I need help getting the word out. The best advice I have for writers is to stop using the term “aspiring” when thinking about yourself. New authors need to be and think like writers and then work exceptionally hard to make a complicated transition to an author. I am happy to share my experiences and advice.

Editor’s note: For more information or to purchase “Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale,” visit Duncan Forgey’s website at www.duncanforgey.com. The book can be bought through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Dorrance Publishing.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


The bay lights up tonight with a Newport Dunes celebration

Tonight (Friday, Nov. 25), the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort kicks off their holiday season with the Lighting of the Bay’s opening night celebration featuring a full schedule of festivities.

For opening night, enjoy live musical performances, stocking decorating, holiday photo booths and more. Santa will take center stage at dusk as he flips the magic switch to illuminate the bay with more than 50 floating holiday decorations and Christmas trees. 

The bay lights up tonight trees

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Courtesy of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort

Lighting of the Bay begins nightly, tonight through Sunday, Jan. 1, 2023

Once the bay is aglow, children will have the opportunity to meet and take photos with Santa. Guests are invited to bring blankets and beach chairs and relax while sipping on hot cocoa and cider during an outdoor movie screening of a holiday favorite, Elf (PG), to wrap up the evening. Festive food and beverages will be available for purchase. 

This evening’s schedule is as follows:

–Holiday Food Concessions and Bar from 4-8 p.m. serving clam chowder, chili, churros, with festive drinks available for purchase and a full bar.

–Photo booth from 4-8 p.m.

–Stocking decorating from 4-7 p.m. (or until supplies last).

–Southern California Brass Consortium from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

–Performance by OC Song & Dance from 5:30-6 p.m.

–Santa’s arrival & Lighting of the Bay at 6 p.m.

–Photos with Santa from 6:15-8:30 p.m.

–Holiday Movie on the Beach: Elf (PG) after Lighting of the Bay.

The Lighting of the Bay continues nightly at dusk through Sunday, Jan. 1, 2023.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort & Marina is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com.


Kure it Cancer Research, founded by Newport Beach’s Barry Hoeven, celebrates 15th anniversary

Guests numbering 220, many of them Newport Beach residents, gathered Saturday, Nov. 5 at City National Grove of Anaheim for Kure It Cancer Research’s Let’s Save Lives Gala, themed “Cures for Kids.”

Attendees were treated to a tempting silent auction full of a fantastic selection of wines and spirits, as well as art and overnights at esteemed locations. Approving comments came from guests drinking the pours from the Cali Distillery whiskey tasting.

Kure It Board Chair Todd Perry welcomed guests, acknowledging the board of directors, staff, women’s guild and sponsors. He explained that Kure It directly funds researchers targeting underfunded cancers at many of the country’s top comprehensive cancer centers, and provides grants in the $50,000 to $250,000 range to provide seed money to help get an innovative idea off the ground in hopes that larger funding can be secured to take the research to the next level.

Kure It Cancer Kim trio

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Photos courtesy of Kure It Cancer Research

(L-R) City of Hope’s Drs. Sumanta Pal, Edward Kim and Leo Wang

Towards that end, Perry introduced Dr. Edward Kim, physician-in-chief and senior vice president, City of Hope Orange County, who is a renowned cancer researcher and recruited dozens of cancer-fighting physician scientists from around the country making the new City of Hope campus in Irvine the epicenter for cancer breakthroughs. He acknowledged Kure It’s partnership in supporting research for kidney and other underfunded cancers. “With your support, you have helped save thousands of lives and will continue to do so as we advance the science of cancer care,” he said.

Kure It Cancer Hoevens

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Barry Hoeven’s son, Westport Properties President/CIO and honoree Drew Hoeven with his wife, Jaime

Sumanta Pal, M.D. who heads Kure It’s medical advisory board and serves as co-director of City of Hope’s kidney cancer program, discussed his relationship with Kure It Founder Barry Hoeven, when Hoeven wanted to turn his kidney cancer diagnosis into a message of hope to others 15 years ago by establishing a named fund at City of Hope and Dr. Pal was his oncologist.

Leo Wang, M.D., Ph.D., who is City of Hope’s pediatric hematology-oncology specialist is determined to improve the survival outcomes of children diagnosed with brain tumors. He said City of Hope is leading the way in developing game-changing treatments for these kids.

A special Kure It video celebrated the nonprofit’s 15 years of raising $13.5 million for underfunded cancer research and supporting 55 research projects. It is on target in 2022 to grant $1 million to fund cancer research.

Kure It Cancer Youngs

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Sponsors Linda and Burton Young (honoree)

Kure It Cancer Bovees

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Jessica and Daniel Bovee (honoree and Bank of America director) 

Auctioneer Jim Nye conducted the live auction, which included an Hawaiian getaway and a stay in New Zealand; four center court seats to a LA Lakers vs. Portland Blazers game; a day of fishing for six with a professional captain; an 11-course dinner with wines for 12 guests in your own home; a stay at Pelican Hill Resort with dinner; the use of an Aston Martin from Aston Martin Newport Beach, and a four-hour charter cruise on a VanDutch 55 yacht for 11 guests.

The evening progressed to a casino format as an In-N-Out truck provided its tasty hamburgers to departing guests. 

The generous crowd helped boost proceeds in the Fund-A-Kure to an overall amount of $133,250 with $378,000 being raised for pediatric cancer research.

Kure It Cancer Nahins

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Kure It board member Marianne Nahin and her husband Jim Nahin (honoree)

Kure It Cancer Smyth

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Kure It board member and honoree Jenny Smyth, SVP City National Bank, Private Banking

Kure It, Inc. is an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit providing funding for translational research projects focused on kidney cancer and other underfunded cancers. The funds raised through Kure It directly support groundbreaking research at leading cancer centers. Founded by Barry Hoeven in 2007 after his diagnosis with kidney cancer, Kure It expanded to support all underfunded cancers when the vast disconnect between the number of people afflicted with cancer and the amount of funding available for research became apparent. To date, Kure It has raised nearly $13.5 million for cancer research and holds strong to the belief, “Together We Can Eradicate Cancer.” For more information, visit www.KureIt.org.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Heart to Hart…

Evelyn Hart passes Wednesday at 91

TJ headshot AugEvelyn Hart, one of Newport Beach’s most cherished grand dames, passed away Wednesday, Nov. 23, at the age of 91. 

Known for a smile that would light up any room, Evelyn served the city for years and her name is now imprinted on the fabric of the community for decades to come. A two-time mayor, who served 16 years on city council, Evelyn was instrumental in many issues, perhaps none bigger than the negotiating of the John Wayne Airport Settlement Agreement in 1985.

Her name now is permanently etched on the OASIS Senior Center’s Evelyn Hart Events Center, where she was instrumental in chairing the senior center’s original building capital campaign. The city had determined back in 2007 that raising $10 million would be needed to rebuild the center, a cost that would eventually grow to $20 million.

Still, Hart and Dr. Gwynn Parry, of Hoag Hospital, put together a committee and went to work, getting an initial $5.6 million for the Irvine Company, before going on to raise another $4.5 million.

Evelyn continued to serve the city in her later years with the Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter, Youth Employment Service and Someone Cares Soup Kitchen.

She was a governor’s appointee to the state Board of Behavioral Sciences and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, worked diligently to enact the Greenlight Initiative to manage development and growth in the city, and served on the board of directors of Airfair, an organization instrumental in monitoring managed growth of John Wayne Airport.

Fair Game woman holding dog in front of sign SNN 11.25

Courtesy of Robyn Grant

Evelyn Hart and friend posing next to the sign at OASIS Senior Center, a facility she worked so hard to improve over the years

Evelyn was also president of the League of Cities, vice-president of the Orange County Sanitation District and chairwoman of the Local Agency Formation Commission and with the Coast Community College District’s board of trustees.

Evelyn has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1951, moving here shortly after attending Pomona High School.

She was named Newport Beach Citizen of the Year in 2007.

Among others, Evelyn leaves behind her husband John of 61 years.

Upon news of her passing, many Newport Beach leaders spoke on her behalf:

“I’ve been blessed to work with Evelyn on the Council and more recently on the Animal Shelter and playing bridge. Her upbeat attitude, always fun loving was a huge asset in my life and I will treasure her always,” said Jean Watt, former Newport Beach City Councilmember and longtime icon of SPON (initially named Stop Polluting Our Newport).

New City Council-Elect member Robyn Grant was a longtime friend, saying, “Evelyn possessed a rare and inimitable ability to be everyone’s best friend. She had a lifetime of experience and instinct that she shared with all who knew her. Purposeful but kind in her approach, she brought together anyone and everyone in her tireless efforts to improve our community. She was the lifeblood of the OASIS building campaign, raising millions to bring the center to fruition and staying at the helm for many years as the President of the Friends of OASIS.

“Evelyn and I shared a great love for animals and worked together in support of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter. She will be hugely missed as we open that new city facility but remembered every time a pet finds a new forever home.

Fair Game three women SNN 11.25

Courtesy of Robyn Grant

(L-R) The three grand dames of Newport Beach: Evelyn Hart, Jean Watt and Marian Bergeson

“Evelyn was a joy to know. She never wavered from her good nature. I among many, many others feel a huge sadness to have lost such a dear friend, but I am also filled with overwhelming gratitude to have known the truly lovely and venerable Evelyn Hart.”

Assemblywoman-Elect and former Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon said, “We mourn the loss of a true community servant. Evelyn Hart served our community with selfless determination and dedication. Her vision for a world-class center for seniors became OASIS Senior Center only because of her leadership in rallying the community, the city and the Irvine Company

“Her next goal remains alive – a community swimming pool to serve all ages, including seniors and people in need of physical rehabilitation. 

“Her legacy lives on for all of us to make Newport Beach the best it can be through public and community service. Evelyn, we will miss you, especially your infectious laugh and bright smile.”

City Councilmember Joy Brenner added, “The ebullient Evelyn Hart was one of my earliest mentors and a dear friend. When I was first on the Parks, Beaches & Recreation Commission, Ruthelyn Plummer and Evelyn had Women in Government luncheons at her house. They were very encouraging and informative to those of us who would one day follow in their footsteps. Her contagious smile will be tremendously missed!” 

Former Mayor and City Councilmember Will O’Neill added, “Evelyn always had a smile for every person she met. She was passionate and articulate and enjoyed life. Newport Beach is a better place because Evelyn made sure of it.”

Two former mayors, Keith Curry and Rush Hill, joined in with accolades. With Curry saying, “Evelyn was the heart and soul of Newport Beach. She was a force of nature getting the OASIS Senior Center rebuilt and was one of the most respected leaders in our city. She left a big contribution to the quality of life and public services in our Newport Beach and she is simply irreplaceable,” said Curry.

Hill said, “Evelyn was a high energy person full of smiles and good ideas. Newport is a better community because of her. Evelyn’s legacy is the gift of OASIS to our seniors. She was loved by all and her sparkle will be missed.”

Fair Game Will and Evelyn SNN 11.25

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Former Mayor and current City Councilmember Will O’Neill was on hand to celebrate Evelyn’s 89th birthday, almost two years ago at China Palace

Former Newport Beach City Manager Homer Bludau added, “Evelyn was a huge positive force in this community for so many years both on the City Council and then in all the years afterwards. When she made her mind to do something, it was going to get done! Her commitment to building the OASIS Senior Center is only one of her many legacy achievements.”

And finally, former longtime Daily Pilot Editor Tony Dodero added, “I got to know Evelyn back when I was a reporter covering Newport City Hall for the Daily Pilot in the early ‘90s, and we remained friends as I moved on to become Editor. She was strong in her convictions and always voted in the best interests of the residents she represented. Newport Beach has lost a legend and a very kind person.” 

There are no funeral plans as of yet, but we will keep you posted.

• • •

You may notice Newport Beach Firefighters wearing black badge shrouds, with purple mourning flags displayed in front of all eight local fire stations to honor OCFA Fire Engineer Mike Tooley, who recently passed away.

Engineer Tooley, who had been with his department for 25 years, passed away after a courageous battle with occupational cancer, which has been determined to be a Line of Duty Death.


Sperm whales put on a show for local whale watchers

Monday (Nov. 21), crew members aboard Newport Coastal Adventure made an incredibly rare sighting of a pod of four to five sperm whales about 30 miles off the coast of Newport Beach. 

Sperm whales get large; they are estimated at more than 50 feet and could weigh up to 136,000 lbs. when fully grown. The whales also started breaching (when a whale hurls its body up and out of the water) to add to the show. 

Sperm whales put on a show whale breaching SNN 11.25

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Courtesy of Newport Coastal Adventure

Sperm whale breaching in Pacific off of Newport Beach coast

Crew members with Newport Coastal Adventure were in awe of the sperm whale sightings because the whales spend most of their time out at sea feeding in the depths of the ocean for giant squid. And when they do surface it’s for less than 10 minutes at a time and then dive to feed for up to two hours at depths of up to 9,800 ft.

Crew aboard Newport Coastal Adventure brought a hydrophone to help locate the sperm whale which hunts by using an extremely loud echolocation, which you can hear clearly with the use of an underwater hydrophone. The hydrophone was able to help their crew listen for the sound of the echolocation to spot where the whale might surface, and, obviously, it worked. 

Newport Coastal Adventure whale watching and dolphin tours depart daily all year long, offering multiple whale watching boat styles that include larger passenger vessels, catamarans, and smaller six to 15 passenger Zodiac tours. 

For more information, go to https://newportwhales.com/.


Canned food goods drive at Segerstrom Center for the Arts runs throughout Moulin Rouge!

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is joining in to host the Can-Can Canned Food Drive throughout the run of Moulin Rouge! The Musical.

The drive will help the Orange County Food Bank fully stock its shelves with canned food goods for those in-need. All patrons, attending Moulin Rouge! The Musical are encouraged to donate canned goods to help the nearly 20% of children in Orange County living in “food insecure” households. 

The effort truly puts Moulin Rouge! The Musical’s four values of Truth, Beauty, Freedom, and Love into practice, while Segerstrom Center is excited to involve the community in one harmonious effort to cultivate compassion and reduce food insecurity throughout the county. 

Canned food goods The cast

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

The cast of the North American Tour of “Moulin Rouge! The Musical”

Along with the public, Center staff will exercise the musical’s core values, too, and contribute to the food drive by having an internal contest to see which department can collect the most canned goods. In August, during the Hadestown run, more than 2,000 pounds of canned food were collected. The Center is determined to beat that number and spread Truth, Beauty, Freedom and Love throughout the community.    

Moulin Rouge! The Musical runs from through November 27. 

Donation bins will be on-site provided by the OC Food Bank throughout the main lobby of Segerstrom Hall. 

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


The tradition continues: A Christmas Carol returns to South Coast Repertory

South Coast Repertory (SCR) celebrates the holiday season with their 42nd production of A Christmas Carol, a longtime Orange County favorite. The Charles Dickens classic, adapted by Jerry Patch, runs November 26-December 24 on the Segerstrom Stage.

SCR Founding Member Richard Doyle returns for his second year as Ebenezer Scrooge. His performances as the miserly curmudgeon in last year’s production drew critical praise. And Hisa Takakuwa returns to direct, along with Artistic Director David Ivers and Managing Director Paula Tomei.

A Christmas Carol resonates deeply with me,” Ivers said. “It inspires me on a professional level and has become a beacon to me on a personal level. Everyone who saw Richard Doyle take the top hat and scarf and make it his own last year knew they were watching something special. When you combine that with Hisa Takakuwa’s knowledge and artistry, an outstanding cast and stellar creative team, you have a truly special holiday experience.”

The tradition continues Scrooge

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Photos by Jenny Graham/SCR

Richard Doyle as Scrooge

All in all, Doyle brings 37 years of A Christmas Carol experience to audiences. He has played many of the show’s characters, including the Ghosts of Christmas Past and Present, Fezziwig, Scrooge’s nephew Fred and both solicitors.

“This year will be slightly different, because this year, I will have an ownership of this amazing role I was charged with creating for the first-time last year,” Doyle said. “Now, rather than working to make it my own, it will be my story to tell. Actors are at heart storytellers and as stories go, this is a great one.”

Takakuwa relishes her role as director. She served as assistant director for 14 years and also appeared in the production for 14 more. Her experience with the production, her skill working with the 16 children who alternate performances and the level of trust she inspires among both returning actors and newcomers adds to the quality awaiting audiences.

“I am honored to both shepherd the cherished legacy of SCR’s A Christmas Carol and support beloved Founding Artist Richard Doyle as he continues to deepen and grow his Ebenezer Scrooge,” Takakuwa said. “I am especially excited to welcome several new cast members into the A Christmas Carol family this year, all of whom are SCR veterans. As always, there will be a bit of new to keep it fresh for audiences, but never at the cost of the heart-warming and comforting holiday classic that so many hold as a family tradition.”

Joining Doyle in A Christmas Carol’s cast are Preston Maybank (Bob Cratchit), Michael Manuel (Ghost of Marley), Richard Soto (Ghost of Christmas Present), Jennifer Parsons (Ghost of Christmas Past), Melody Butiu (Mrs. Fezziwig/Solicitor), Tommy Beck (Young Scrooge), Larry Bates (Fred/Gentleman), Kelsey Bray (Mrs. Shelley/Pursued Maiden), Eduardo Enrikez (Joe, Young Marley), Michael Reese Shald (Topper), Erika Schindele (Belle), Nick Slimmer (Thomas Shelley), William Francis McGuire (Mr. Fezziwig), Elyse Mirto (Mrs. Cratchit) and Alicia Coca (Sally).

The tradition continues dancing

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William Francis McGuire (Mr. Fezziwig) with Melody Butiu (Mrs. Fezziwig/Solicitor) and the cast of SCR’s “A Christmas Carol”

The cast is joined by 16 young performers, who are divided into two eight-person teams. The teams alternate performances. The child actors are students in the SCR Theatre Conservatory who auditioned for their roles after completing at least two years in the Conservatory.

The creative team includes Thomas Buderwitz, scenic design; Dwight Richard Odle, costume design; Donna & Tom Ruzika, lighting design; Dennis McCarthy, music arrangement/composer; Drew Dalzell, sound design; Dennis Castellano, vocal director; Kelly Todd, choreographer; Joanne DeNaut, CSA, casting and Talia Krispel, production stage manager.

A Christmas Carol received generous support from Honorary Producers Julianne and George Argyros/Argyros Family Foundation. 

Tickets are now on sale and range in price from $35-$101, with additional discounts available for children under 12. Tickets may be purchased online at www.scr.org or by phone at 714.708.5555. 

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Balboa Island Classical Concert to feature Block by Block

Mark your calendars for the next Balboa Island Classical Concert on Tuesday, Dec. 13, the perfect way to welcome the holiday season.

Block by Block will be performing a special Christmas program. Each member of this highly acclaimed group is a skilled professional for the Orange County Pacific Symphony.

Balboa Island Classical Concert

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Block by Block will perform a special Christmas program on December 13

Due to their popular demand, the concert time is moved up. The concert will be held from 7:30-8:30 p.m. with a reception to follow at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach. Everyone is invited.

The cost for this spectacular performance is $20 per person. Tickets are limited and will be available at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach, or online at www.balboaislandnb.org.


Night of 1000 Lights dazzles Sherman Library & Gardens beginning December 9

Sherman Library & Gardens is presenting Nights of 1000 Lights for 11 nights in December beginning Friday, Dec. 9, where you can stroll through the Gardens this holiday season and experience a dazzling display of lights and live entertainment. This year’s theme is “Hooray for Hollywood!” 

Night of 1000 light tunnel

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Walk through the dazzling light tunnel

Enter Sherman Gardens on the red carpet and stroll through the glistening light tunnel, on your way to Moulin Rouge, a Parisian dance hall in the Tea Garden featuring can-can dancers and French cabaret singers. Take photos by a classic 1938 Packard 120 Convertible Sedan, compliments of Packards International Motor Car Club. Experience the historic Hollywood Hills recreated with images from the Sherman Library archives. Venture through the Sherman Shop of Horrors and encounter Trouble in Paradise in the Tropical Conservatory.

A must-see is a visit to Santa in his Miracle on PCH workshop. Then head to the fire pit to whip up your own batch of s’mores. The Garden Shop will be open and filled with unique holiday gifts.

Don’t forget to make a wish at The Wishing Tree to create lasting memories with friends and family.

Nights of 1000 Lights takes place December 9-11 and 15-22 each night from 6-9 p.m.

This event will sell out, so for tickets and more information, visit www.thesherman.org, or call 949.673.2261.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Registration is now open for City of Newport Beach Rec winter programs

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept. is gearing up for its winter programs with registration beginning this Thursday, Nov. 17.

Get a glimpse of the winter classes now that the winter Navigator is live (and due to arrive in mailboxes this week!), because there are classes for all ages. Learn to play a new instrument, pick up a new sport, or learn to dance...the possibilities are endless.

registration is now open winter camps snow

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept.

But, before you slide into winter, check out some of their fall offerings. Spots are still available in the OC Tiny Tots Academy Preschool. Your tiny tot will engage in small group instruction art, science, multi-sensory learning, music, movement and imaginative play.

To view the winter Navigator digital version and sign up for the programs, click here.


Cyndi Lauper, Giada De Laurentiis and Richard Blade highlight this year’s Candlelight Concert

Segerstrom Center for the Arts rolls out the red carpet for the community’s most generous arts supporters as they celebrate the 48th Candlelight Concert on Friday, Dec. 2. This annual event is one of Orange County’s most elegant and anticipated fundraisers that is both a highlight of the holiday season and supports the Center’s nonprofit artistic, education and community engagement programs.

Since its inception in 1974, Candlelight Concert has raised more than $40 million to support the Center’s array of stellar entertainment, arts, education and community engagement programs, as well as the American Ballet Theatre William J. Gillespie School and Studio D Arts School for All Abilities, impacting the lives of more than 400,000 annually. 

The funds raised also support new artistic endeavors such as ballet commissions and world premiere productions. The continued support provided from Candlelight allows the Center to expand the idea of what it means to both participate and appreciate the arts, for everyone.

Cyndi Lauper Segerstrom

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Courtesy of scfta.org

This year’s Candlelight Concert is a highlight of the holiday season and supports the Center’s nonprofit artistic, education and community engagement programs

Candlelight Concert is chaired this year by John E. Stratman Jr., who serves on Segerstrom Center’s board of directors and is senior director of public affairs and brand communication for Kaiser Permanente Orange County. “I strongly believe we are a bridge to the future of where the arts will go and are responsible for paving the path, step by step, for the new generation to come,” said Stratman. “Our job is to ensure that the arts live, and continue to be vibrant in Orange County, and are available and accessible for everyone. I am truly honored and humbled to be this year’s Candlelight Chair.”

This year will include a special performance by Cyndi Lauper. Over the past 40 years, Lauper has been well acclaimed for being a pop icon. She is most well-known for her pop hits “Time After Time” and “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” which won her a 1986 Grammy Award for best new artist. 

Although she is regarded for being a pop icon, Lauper is no stranger to the theater. She wrote lyrics for Broadway’s Kinky Boots, which went on to win six Tony Awards, two of which being Best Music and Best Original Score. Kinky Boots appeared at Segerstrom Hall in both 2014 and 2018. 

This year’s Candlelight dinner menu will be designed by world-renowned celebrity chef, Giada De Laurentiis, who will also be in attendance for the evening and will provide Giada Catering by Giada de Laurentiis. Best known for hosting the Food Network’s Giada at Home, she also appears regularly as a contributor and guest co-host on NBC’s Today.

Legendary Southern California radio, television and film personality and DJ – Richard Blade – will be spinning the tunes and rocking some new wave music and electronica hits to set the mood for the night. Blade, a long-time disc jockey at KROQ in Los Angeles, is best known for being the voice of the ‘80s music scene with radio programs featuring new wave artists. He is also a host for SiriusXM’s 1st Wave classic alternative station since 2005. 

For table and ticket purchases, sponsorships and underwriting, or for more information, contact Courtney Donley, senior director of special events at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 714.942.6247.


The Gray Academy to host a festive holiday fundraiser at the Hyatt Newport Beach

On Sunday, Dec. 11, The Gray Academy is hosting a festive holiday fundraiser at the Hyatt Newport Beach with a cocktail hour, local vendors, plus performances by musical guests David Foster and Katharine McPhee Foster. The event starts at 4 p.m. with a cocktail hour and holiday boutique with jewelry from Mama Bijoux, Backhouse candles, Skout Interior Design and more.

Next, attendees will enjoy an intimate musical performance by David Foster and Katharine McPhee Foster, featuring tunes from their upcoming holiday album. 

The Gray Academy Fosters

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Photo by Morelli Brothers

Enjoy an intimate musical performance by David Foster and Katharine McPhee Foster

This event is in support of Orange County families working to bring the wonderful program at The Gray Academy – a school in Santa Monica for children with neurological disorders and complex medical needs – to our community. 

Not only will your ticket purchase help to fund life-changing education, therapy, and support for these children and their families, but you will also have a fun night celebrating the holiday season with friends.

To purchase tickets and learn more about The Gray Academy, visit www.charityvalet.com/gray/tourn1.asp.

Hyatt Newport Beach is located at 1107 Jamboree Road, Newport Beach.


CdM Home Tour tickets on sale this week, take advantage of Black Friday Special Ticket

Don’t miss the event of the new year – the CdM Home Tour – where you can gather your friends together for an enjoyable and memorable day. Tickets are on sale this week for the long awaited 49th CdM Home Tour, so be sure to take advantage of the Black Friday Special Ticket. Tickets are available from Friday, Nov. 25, exclusively at www.cdmhometour.com.

The CdM Home Tour will take place on Tuesday, March 7, 2023 and is a fun and enjoyable full-day event which includes breakfast, tours of several stunning homes in the Newport Beach/Corona del Mar area, a delicious luncheon at the Civic Center, a variety of beautiful boutiques during lunch, student performances and a fun After-Party.

CdM Home Tour tickets deck view

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Courtesy of CdM Home Tour

A residence on a previous CdM Home Tour offered ocean views from the rooftop deck 

The Black Friday Special Ticket is priced at $95 and includes one event ticket, a Neighborhoood ad and three Opportunity Drawing Tickets (Regular value $185). It is only available from November 25-28. There are also Black Friday Special Underwriting Packages which include complimentary Opportunity Drawing Tickets with each level.

Follow cdmhomteour2023 on Instagram to keep up to date with all the news. Details about all opportunities and tickets can be found at www.cdmhometour.com.

Get involved now and create “Endless Possibilities” for CdM students.


Only a few more chances to see Moulin Rouge! The Musical

The Tony Award-winning Best Musical Moulin Rouge! The Musical is in its final shows at Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ Segerstrom Hall for a limited three-week engagement, ending November 27 and there are still great seats available.

Produced by Carmen Pavlovic, Bill Damaschke and Gerry Ryan, the cast is led by Courtney Reed as Satine and Conor Ryan as Christian, as well as Austin Durant as Harold Zidler, André Ward as Toulouse-Lautrec, David Harris as The Duke of Monroth, Gabe Martínez as Santiago and Libby Lloyd as Nini. Yvette Gonzalez-Nacer is the Satine Alternate. The cast includes Nicci Claspell, Harper Miles, Andrés Quintero, Adrienne Balducci, Andrew Brewer, Jack Cahill-Lemme, Sam J. Cahn, Darius Crenshaw, Alexander Gil Cruz, Alexa De Barr, Tamrin Goldberg, Alexis Hasbrouck, Jordan Fife Hunt, Justin Keats, Tyler John Logan, Tanisha Moore, Brayden Newby, Kent Overshown, Amy Quanbeck, Ayden Pratt, Adéa Michelle Sessoms, Jenn Stafford, Denzel Tsopnang, Travis Ward-Osborne, Sharrod Williams, Jennifer Wolfe and Ricardo A. Zayas. 

Only a few more chances to see Durant and cast

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Photo by Matthew Murphy for MurphyMade.jpg

Austin Durant and cast of the North American Tour of “Moulin Rouge! The Musical” 

Moulin Rouge! The Musical is the winner of 10 2021 Tony Awards including Best Musical, two Drama League Awards including Outstanding Production of a Musical, five Drama Desk Awards and 10 Outer Critics Circle Award Honor citations including New Broadway Musical. 

For tickets, go here. For more information, visit www.moulinrougemusical.com/us-tour/home/.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


President and CEO Gary Sherwin of Newport Beach & Company honored in Orange County Business Journal’s OC 500 Directory of Influence

Newport Beach & Company, the global destination marketing agency for the City of Newport Beach, announced that Orange County Business Journal has named President and CEO Gary Sherwin to the OC 500, a ranking of business leaders in Orange County, Calif. The OC 500 honors 500 influential business leaders who continue to have a driving impact on economic growth in Orange County. The list features the most powerful business leaders influencing and leaving their mark on Orange County. Featured executives are selected after months of extensive research in dozens of industries and business categories that dominate the county.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

As Newport Beach & Company’s President and CEO, Sherwin has been recognized for overseeing the destination-marketing organization and its subsidiaries, which promote the City of Newport Beach as a premier luxury leisure and meetings destination. Being recognized in the Hospitality category of the OC 500, Sherwin has created the destination-marketing organization of the future where six stand-alone business units work together to promote Newport Beach, including all tourism, conferences, economic development, signature events, restaurants and the local TV station. Sherwin is at the forefront of making tourism a top economic driver for Newport Beach that generates millions of dollars to benefit public services, provide jobs, keep local businesses thriving and improve the quality of life for the community.

“At Newport Beach & Company, our dynamic and innovative organization works collaboratively with our community partners to create and execute marketing plans that meet each business unit’s objectives, while strengthening the Newport Beach brand as a whole and driving revenue to the city,” said Sherwin. “Because of this, I am deeply honored to be recognized alongside such an impressive group of individuals in Orange County who make such a tremendous impact on this community daily.” 

A 33-year hospitality industry veteran, Sherwin, CDME, APR has served as president and CEO of Newport Beach & Company since 2013 and its tourism business unit, Visit Newport Beach Inc. since 2006.  He is responsible for overseeing the community marketing organization promoting Newport Beach, Calif. as a premier luxury destination. 

Sherwin also served as the chairman of the Washington DC-based Destinations International, the trade association for global destination marketing organizations. Sherwin is past chairman of the Orange County Visitors Association and is also the past chairman of the California Travel Association, the state’s leading umbrella tourism advocacy organization. He also sits on the board of directors for the US Travel Association. He has previously worked for the destination marketing organizations in Los Angeles and Palm Springs. 

Founded in January 2013, Newport Beach & Company is a non-profit organization established to serve as the official marketing agency for the City of Newport Beach. The agency brings together all of the marketing entities connected to the Newport Beach brand, and is designed to oversee separate business units that include Visit Newport Beach, Celebrate Newport Beach, Enterprise Newport Beach and Newport Beach TV. For more information, go to www.visitnewportbeach.com.


There are still openings for ENC Winter Nature Camps

There are still openings kids

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Courtesy of ENC

There are still a few spots available for the Environmental Nature Center’s (ENC) Winter Nature Camps, and they are now enrolling. This year, they are offering camps at both of their locations: the Environmental Nature Center in Newport Beach and the ENC Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary in Modjeska Canyon. Little Naturalist Camp is offered for kids age 4 and Nature Adventure Camp is offered for kids 5-8. Week 1 is December 27-30 and Week 2 is January 3-6, 2023. For more information and to register, go here.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Super Sabot Saturday

November 19

Adult Sabot A Fleet (3 races)

1 Scott Finkboner, MBYC, Total 5

2 Larry Coon, MBYC, Total 7

3 Lynn Acosta, DPYC, Total 9

4 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 11

5 Karen Luttrell, BYC, Total 16

6 Gail Kalscheur, BYC, Total 19

7 Bob Reilly, BYC, Total 23

Adult Sabot B Fleet (3 races)

1 Eva Evans, BYC, Total 6

2 Carol Harmon, BYC, Total 6

3 Jeff Descombes, SSC, Total 9

4 Stacey Ware, SSC, Total 11

5 Sandra Lindsey, BYC, Total 16

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members: 

On Tuesday, Nov. 15, the City Council approved the 2022 California building standards codes and California fire codes, which regulate the design and construction of structures to protect life and property. The state adopts new codes every three years and cities are required to adopt the same codes with specific amendments as deemed necessary by local communities.

While much of the building and fire code updates apply to new construction, there are requirements for existing structures located in Newport Beach’s established Very High Fire Severity Zone. The 2022 codes will become part of the city’s municipal code effective January 1, 2023.

The new requirements for property owners in Newport Beach’s Very High Fire Severity Zone include:

–Installation of 1/8” mesh screening to protect ventilation openings from ember intrusion in the event of a wildfire. This helps protect homes and other structures from flying, hot embers during a wind-driven wildfire.

–Trim existing trees from hanging over or touching structures to reduce burning vegetation from igniting structures. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety, in cooperation with the National Fire Protection Association, recommends the clearance of all trees within five feet of structures to reduce the spread of burning vegetation.

–Create and maintain a one-foot wide, noncombustible zone at the base of new and existing structures to prevent falling embers from igniting structures.

For more information on the 2022 codes, see the City Council’s November 15 archived agenda. Those who own property in urban-wildlife interface areas can visit this page for more information. All residents are encouraged to become familiar with basic fire prevention recommendations and fire safety tips from the Newport Beach Fire Department.

For questions or assistance, contact Fire Marshal Kevin Bass by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.644.3106.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

Dog Park Renovations Now Complete

The dog park (Avocado Avenue and San Miguel Drive) was closed for major maintenance work for the first time since it opened in May 2014. The city’s contractor replaced the synthetic turf, drinking water fountains and fence screens. Work also included repainting the fencing and signage, repairing the uplifted sidewalk and installing two new shade structures in the Small Dog Park Area. The city appreciates the community’s patience during this maintenance closure.

Shredding/E-Waste Event Helped Divert 12 Tons of Materials from Landfills

On October 22, the Public Works Department held a paper shredding/e-waste recycling event at the Big Canyon Reservoir parking lot, located near Harbor Day School. The event was open to all residents and supported recycling and waste diversion efforts, resulting in the diversion of more than two tons of e-waste and 10 tons of shredded material. The city partnered with volunteers from Sage Hill School on the e-waste diversion efforts, as well as CR&R to provide residents complimentary organics kitchen pails. The city hosts paper shredding/e-waste recycling events twice each year and the next event will be held in Spring 2023.

Also, residents that are customers of CR&R can schedule doorstep collection for the following items at any time, year-round, at no charge:

–E-waste – examples: computers, televisions, printers, cell phones.

–Bulky items – examples: couches, chairs, beds, dressers (Up to five items, five times per year).

–Household hazardous waste – examples: batteries, car care products, paints and paint thinners, cleaning supplies, pesticides, lightbulbs.

–Sharps – examples: syringes, needles, autoinjectors (All Newport Beach residents can receive one free sharps container with pre-paid postage and return box every three months).

To schedule collection for the proper recycling of any of these items, call CR&R at 949.667.4158.

If residents have questions about source separation, recent, recycling-related legislation, or event information, visit the City of Newport Beach website here or contact Refuse Manager Charles Springer at 949.718.3466, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

City Storm Response Efforts

Two weeks ago, the stormy weather kept the city’s staff and contractors busy with tree and beach-related clean-up efforts. A total of 11 tree incidents were reported, with eight of those being city trees that failed and were removed. No property damage was reported as a result of the tree failures. Throughout the storm, staff routinely patrolled city streets, on the lookout for excess debris and downed palm fronds, both public and private. 

The storm brought high winds along the coast and beaches, reaching speeds of 35-40 miles per hour. This caused high volumes of sand to accumulate in the Newport Pier parking lot, as well as along the boardwalk and street ends from 24th Street to Orange Street. 

The city’s sand clean-up efforts involved two bobcats with sweeper attachments, as well as a two-person crew on the ground to shovel and sweep areas inaccessible to the larger equipment. The collected sand is placed back on the beach and the final step involves placing clean sand over the deposited sand. Typically, these efforts take two weeks to complete.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

Last week the Be Well team:

–Transported one person to the Be Well sobering station for treatment.

–Transported one person to a crisis stabilization unit for treatment.

–Reunited a lost child with the parents in a park.

–Transported six people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

Last week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Sheltered an older adult in a motel to prepare for her housing placement appointment. The OASIS Senior Center staff loaned her a walker to ease her mobility issues. Be Well provided transportation after the appointment. 

–Continued to shelter people. Twenty people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Enrolled an older adult and her daughter into the county’s Coordinated Entry System for housing and assisted the mother with applying for Social Security Survivor’s Benefits.

–Completed two enrollment applications for people waiting to enter the Yale Navigation Center.

–Enrolled a new client into services.

–Referred a man to the Veteran’s Administration for services and completed a housing voucher application with another older veteran.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

This Week’s Events

Wednesday, Nov. 23

Zoning Administrator Meeting
Zoom – 10 a.m.

Libraries Close Early

6 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 24 & Friday, Nov. 25

Holiday Closure

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, Nov. 18 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


If you’re traveling for the holidays, here are some tips to ease the pain

The Thanksgiving holiday is one of the most heavily traveled periods of the year and passengers traveling through John Wayne Airport (JWA) now through Monday, Nov. 28 will experience higher-than-normal passenger traffic.

Passengers are encouraged to plan accordingly to avoid delays and enjoy stress-free holiday travel. Review the following tips to help you go from curbside, through security checkpoints, and to your gate.

Before Arriving to the Airport

Check your live flight status here and tracking information on our website or directly with your airline. Checking the flight status enables travelers as well as those picking up travelers to stay up to date with travel times. 

Arriving for a Flight

All passengers are encouraged to arrive 90 minutes to two hours before scheduled departure times for domestic flights and three hours before international flights to find parking, check luggage, and go through security screening.

If you re traveling arrival level

Parking

Airport parking structures are likely to reach capacity during peak travel periods. Travelers should plan to check real-time parking availability online or by calling 949.252.5200.

–Parking Structures A1, A2, B2, and C are located adjacent to and directly across from the Riley Terminal at a rate of $2/hour up to $20/day.

–The Main St. Parking Lot ,located at 15132 Main St. in Irvine, is available for $14/day with free shuttle service to/from the Riley Terminal every 15 minutes between 4:30 a.m. and 12 a.m. Shuttle buses are lift-equipped.

–Curbside Valet Parking is available for $30/day and is located on the Departure (upper) Level curbside between Terminals A and B and Terminals B and C. On your return, call 949.252.6260 or 2-4018 from any White Courtesy phone for service. If arriving after 8 p.m., call the number on the signage posted at the valet booth for service.

–Electric Vehicle (EV) parking spots are located on Level 1 and 2 inside Terminal Parking Structure A and Level 1 inside Terminal Parking Structures B, C and at the Main St. Parking Lot. 

Security Checkpoints

–Know the Transportation Security Administration’s 3-1-1 Liquids Rule for carry-on bags. Traveling with food tip: If you can spill it, spread it, pump it, or pour it, the TSA considers this item a liquid. 

TSA Pre✓® can expedite the screening process in Terminals A, B, and C.

–There are specific rules and exceptions for passengers traveling with infant care items. Visit TSA Tips for Traveling with Children for more information.

Passenger Pick-Up/Drop-Off

Visitors can wait until passengers are ready to be picked up and temporarily park for free at the JWA Cell Phone Waiting Lot. Located south of Parking Structure C near the corner of MacArthur Blvd. and Campus Dr., the lot has 94 designated spaces, including four ADA designated spaces.

–Color-coded and numbered columns along the white curb on the Arrival (lower level) roadway quickly identify where to meet arriving passengers. Terminal A is pink, Terminal B is blue and Terminal C is orange. 

App-Based Rideshare

Arriving guests should be aware of ride app pick-up locations on the Departure (upper level) in Parking Structures A2 and B2 directly across from the Riley Terminal and in Parking Structure C on Level 3 next to the Southwest ticketing area. Ride app drop-off locations are curbside on the Departure Level.

Healthy Travels

TSA no longer requires masks in transportation settings. Guests and employees have the option to wear a mask during travel or while working. Travelers are advised to check with their airline and destination airport for local guidelines. 

Hoag Health in Terminal B in the Departure level, pre-security, provides COVID-19 Rapid Testing. Results are available within 15-30 minutes. Testing is available Monday through Friday from 7 a.m.-4 p.m. 

John Wayne Airport wishes all airport guests safe travels. For more information about the airport visit www.ocair.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The holidays are here…so much to be thankful for and people to recognize

TJ headshot AugPerhaps you’re planning to utilize John Wayne Airport in the coming days or weeks over the holidays. Well, if that’s the case, I have some good news for you.

Sure, many around town complain about JWA because the flight noise disrupts their everyday life. But, a recent passenger survey, following the pandemic, said that JWA has a “consistently high approval rating for travelers, both visitors and residents alike.”

Here’s what was found: Most passengers rated JWA a 4 or 5 out of 5 on their experience. Those polled had an average age of 44 years of age and an annual income of $135,000. Of those surveyed, 68% were visitors, with many of the passengers noting that they used the airport four or more times during the past year.

Here’s what the respondents liked: Convenient location, “with 76% of residents and 65% of passengers indicating its proximity as their primary motivation.” Another plus to users was that JWA was chosen because it was “less busy.”

While historically, business travelers made up the majority of JWA passengers, that switched in the latest survey that indicated 55% of the folks were using it for pleasure or leisure.

Other pluses for JWA besides convenience were cleanliness and security at JWA. 

“Our 2022 passenger survey highlights the airport’s commitment to deliver safe and convenient air travel and a superior guest experience travelers can rely on,” said Charlene Reynolds, JWA airport director. “We are grateful that Orange County residents and visitors have evaluated us so highly and look forward to maintaining our reputation for excellence.”

The survey is JWA’s own biannual assessment that was performed by Phoenix, a MarketCast Company. You can read more here.

• • •

Listen, we have a lot to be thankful for locally. Great location in the world, our weather, schools, safety, etc. We even have great, exciting sports teams at our local schools. However, that being said, in all honesty, there have been better weeks for our local teams. 

Oh, where to start. Let’s go to Boys Water Polo at Newport Harbor…perhaps the foremost program in the county.

The Sailors, fresh off their Open Division CIF-SS Championship win over JSerra, met the Lions again in the CIF SoCal Boys Water Polo Championships, last Saturday, Nov. 19 and lost 11-8. It was the fourth meeting of the year between the county’s top two teams, with each winning twice.

Still, all-in-all, NHHS set out to win CIF and did so. The Sailors finished the year 29-2. 

Local football had a similar outcome. Teams from Newport Harbor and Corona del Mar were moving through the CIF playoffs, when their luck finally ran out.

Newport Harbor lost at Cypress, 17-14, in the CIF-SS Division 4 Playoffs semifinals on a last second field goal.

Across town, CdM lost to Yorba Linda, 51-20, in their semifinal Division 3 game.

And so, it’s on to winter sports at our local high schools. That means basketball, girls water polo and soccer.

• • •

The election season is over…not that the counting of ballots is. Here locally, our line-up moving forward on City Council adds Joe Stapleton (District 1), Erik Weigand (District 3), Robyn Grant (District 4) and Lauren Kleiman (District 6).

They’ll join Will O’Neill, Brad Avery and Noah Blom.

As a reminder, on Tuesday, Dec. 13, as is customary, the Newport Beach City Council will have a limited agenda, say goodbye and thank you to departing councilmembers (Diane Dixon, Joy Brenner, “Duffy” Duffield and Mayor Kevin Muldoon), welcome the newly elected members, swear them in, select new seat positions on the dais and elect a new mayor and mayor pro tem. It’s really a night of celebration.

Then, everyone is encouraged to join in at the 2022 Mayor’s Reception and Chamber Volunteer Awards Ceremony at the Back Bay Bistro at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort. The start time is listed as 6 p.m...but it’s actually dependent on the timing of the festivities over at city hall.

To join in, RSVP by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8. The cost is $50 and you’ll enjoy hors d’oeuvres, steak and turkey carving stations, salmon, pasta, desserts and a no-host bar.

It’s a chance to congratulate the victors. Also, the host Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce will present their Silver Anchor Awards, Ambassador of the Year and their Navigate Young Professional of the Year.

• • •

And, before we totally put the election behind us, congrats to Katie Porter (D) for her 47th District House victory, new 72nd Assemblymember Diane Dixon (R), 36th State Senate member Janet Nguyen (R), OC Supervisor Katrina Foley in the 5th District, Michelle Barto in Newport-Mesa Unified School Districts Area 5 and Lisa Pearson, also NMUSD, in Area 4.

• • •

As we break for Thanksgiving Day, your Stu News team wishes you all a Happy Thanksgiving Day. We’re thankful for you, our readers…and those who support us with their advertising. Obviously, we’re also extremely thankful to our contributors, Nancy Gardner, Amy Senk, Gary Sherwin, Len Bose, Duncan Forgey and Sara Hall whose contributions make us better.

We also thank our community leaders, our public safety team members, non-profit groups and so many others who join us in what we do. You make our town special.

Happy Thanksgiving…and I know our retail friends are waiting for you Friday to kick off the Christmas season. 

And while South Coast Plaza and Fashion Island jump to the top of the shopping lists, don’t forget, as my friend Angela Cortright of Spa Gregorie’s reminded me, Saturday, Nov. 26 is Small Business Saturday. It’s a day we’re urged to shop those retailers who day-in and day-out prove to be the important backbone of our community. Make sure you remember and support them.

• • •

We mentioned Gary Sherwin above…he of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Co. fame and also one of our prized Stu News columnists. Congrats to Gary as he has been recognized by the Orange County Business Journal in their directory of 500 of the OC’s influential business leaders. Well deserved.

In a quick perusal of the list, and remember there are 500 names, I recognized many and pulled a few for mention. (I remind myself that this is a dangerous exercise because someone will accidentally be missed and I will be held accountable. Sorry in advance.)

Robert Braithwaite and Flynn Andrizzi from Hoag; David Bahnsen; Don Bren; Scott Burnham; Rick Caruso (remember him?); Don DiCostanzo; Debra Gunn Downing; John Forsyte; Gavin Herbert (Sr. & Jr.); Gary Jabara; Kory Kramer; Kevin Martin; Vic Merjanian; Tony Moiso; Joe Moody; Mark Moshayedi; Bob Olson; Todd Pickup; Henry & Susan Samueli; the Segerstrom Family; Debbie Snavely; Lynsi Snyder; Annette Walker; Rick Weiner; and Heidi Zuckerman, to name just a few.

Congrats to ALL!

• • •

Your newly elected Orange County Supervisor Katrina Foley for the Fifth District is once again holding her Annual New Coat Drive for Kids, the 14th Annual. 

Drop off a new children’s coat at various locations in Orange County during normal business hours: the office of Supervisor Katrina Foley at the Hall of Administration (400 W. Civic Center Drive, Santa Ana), Costa Mesa City Hall or Costa Mesa Police Department (77 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa) and The Foley Group, PLC (2755 Bristol St., Suite 110, Costa Mesa). 

Donations support local organizations like The Boys & Girls Club-Central Coast, Marshallese Youth OC, SOY (Save Our Youth), and families identified in need by local schools. NEW coats or jackets only please. 

Join Supervisor Foley’s office in spreading holiday cheer and keeping kids in our community warm during winter. 

• • •

Mark your calendar for Sunday, Dec. 4 for the Balboa Island Christmas tree event at the fire station. They have a great program and fun for the kids, too. We heard there will also be a golf cart parade starting a 2 p.m., so get your carts decorated for the holidays and enjoy a fun cruise through the Island. The tree lighting takes place at 4 p.m.


Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond: covered bridge 22, New Hampshire, Conn.

Capturing iconic Newport Beach covered bridge22

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Artwork by Don Krotee

When painting an important or iconic scene or subject, there is often a quandary, in the mind of the viewer, and the painter, related to how much visual information is required to identify the subject. In the mind of every artist, there is always a running debate as to “what to leave in and what to leave out,” to achieve the best possible composition. As in the case of covered bridges in New England, you might not even be concerned. But, if you were interested, you may know, that there is a list and many of the bridges are on the National Register of Historic Places. The reference photo was taken by a relative of the artist and the painting has a strong likeness to the photo. This painting was done as part of a June, 30 x 30 challenge wherein 30 paintings were made in 30 days. The painting is a Fabriano 140# quarter sheet of 22” x 30.”        

~~~~~~~~

Don Krotee is a 36-year resident of Newport Beach, a member of the 2000 General Plan Advisory Committee, a Corona del Mar Residents Association member, the founder of Newport Heights Improvement Association and a board member of SPON. Krotee lives in Corona del Mar, is an architect, a sailor and a fine artist who has been drawing and painting from an early age. He provides Stu News color prints of his original drawings and paintings from iconic Newport Beach and around the world.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back Ferry to Balboa Island.JPG11.22

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Ferry to Balboa Island

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Newport Beach residents support Kidworks’ 16th Annual Foundation for Success Luncheon

A lively panel discussion revealing how influential the late legendary UCLA Head Football Coach Terry Donahue was in the lives of so many athletes and others was a highlight of the recent 16th Annual Foundation for Success Luncheon. Donahue was a longtime Balboa Island resident.

The event supports KidWorks, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit that provides academic, spiritual and leadership programs for underserved children and teens. Attending the event were Coach Donahue’s wife, Andrea, and their daughters along with his brother Pat Donahue and his wife, Paula. 

Other Newport Beach residents in attendance were Steve Craig, Jill and Tom Schriber, Allen Staff, Heidi and Rueben Mendoza, Kyle Team, Beth Kiley, Sharon Kline, Clark Booth, Dennis and Nancy Bear, Ed and Melanie Fitch, John and Kathy Ursini, Kevin and Devon Martin, Steve and Stephanie Rados, Lantz Bell, Stan and Meri Frome, Greg Brown, Steve Perry, Doug Ammerman and Lucy and Rick Rawlins. 

UCLA Athletic Director Martin Jarmond and several other notable UCLA football alumni were present, too.

Newport Beach residents Coach Donahue

Submitted photo

Coach Terry Donahue carried by his fans

The much-anticipated in-person event, held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, Santa Ana/Orange County Airport, raised more than $600,000. The yearly luncheon provides the majority of the funding for academic support, character formation and leadership development programs that empower students from under-resourced communities on their journey from Pre-K through their college years.

Coach Donahue’s impact was greatly felt at KidWorks. He was a co-founder of the annual Foundation for Success Luncheon and instrumental in securing top notch speakers for the event including John Wooden, Bill Walton and rival USC Coach John Robinson.

“We were happy to honor the memory of our dear friend Coach Donahue for the support he and his family have provided to KidWorks for so many years,” said David Benavides, KidWorks’ executive director.

When Donahue’s brother Dan passed away unexpectedly in 2002, friends drew upon their resources to raise more than $1 million to help fund the Dan Donahue Center. Later proceeds from the Building Dreams Capital Campaign fueled expansion of the Center so KidWorks could double its capacity to serve children, youth and parents in central Santa Ana.

Led by Pat Donahue, the panel included the Honorable Cormac Carney, former Dallas Cowboy James Washington, UCLA Football Coach Frank Stephens and former UCLA Rose Bowl quarterback Wayne Cook. 

Newport Beach residents Andrea and Tom

Submitted photo

Andrea Donahue and Tom Schriber

All shared personal remembrances of their experiences with the coach, occasionally bringing tears to the eyes of event attendees who were seated at tables decorated with Uncle Dan Bears wearing T-shirts featuring the universities and colleges KidWorks students have attended.

“We thank all of our generous donors for stepping up in Coach Donahue’s honor,” Benavides said. “In partnership with all of our valued supporters and volunteers, we are guiding children and youth towards positive life choices and redirecting their path towards college.” 

Coach Donahue is said to have expressed it best himself, “Opportunity is a precious gift. How often we give it to others, and how we respond when it is given to us, can define our lives.”

To donate, contact Lisa Gels, KidWorks’ manager of partnerships donor relations at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 714.269.9209.


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Let’s talk about one of their ABSOLUTELY favorite girls. Meet Mika Rose. At just about 1 year and 7 months in age, this ideal, medium-to-large breed Labrador/Terrier/Bully mix is so human friendly that she’s like honey. She takes a bit to get to know new people, but she loves, loves, LOVES humans. She’s probably totally fine with dogs too, because she is very non-reactive. Her personality is not alpha. Her true self has shown shelter staff and volunteers that she is gentle and has the most fantastic manners. She’s trained and loves to give you her paw. If you’ve been looking for a family house dog that you can get to know and will stand by your side with absolute loyalty, then Mika Rose is your dog. It would probably be best if children in the household are maybe a mature 9-12 years of age and older, only because it would be easier for Mika Rose to receive clear signals from them. If you are interested in meeting a truly beautiful shelter favorite, feel free to contact the Newport Beach Animal Shelter at either 949.718.3454 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and they’ll go from there. 

Pet of the Week Meet Mika Rose

Courtesy of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Mika Rose

In addition, they have a great new professional photographer who is donating her time to help the shelter get the best out of their pet guests. They invite you to visit Andrea Domjan’s IG page at @andrea_domjan_photography to see all of her fabulous photography that she shares with the world. 

The shelter does require completed application forms for their animals, so simply print one up from their non-profit’s webpage at www.FONBAS.org. After it is completed, you can email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and upon review, they’ll call you to schedule an appointment. If you have any questions, call 949.718.3454.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

–Rabbits - $45

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner-surrendered domestic pets.


American Legion to host special holiday shopping boutique benefiting troops and vets

The American Legion Auxiliary of Newport Harbor will hold their Holiday Boutique on Thursday, Nov. 17 from 4-7 p.m. Featured will be more than 30 local and national vendors, offering unique products for a special holiday shopping experience. The event will also offer prizes raffled off throughout the evening, a wine bar and a gift-wrapping station.

American Legion to host shopping experience

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Photo by Cindy Edes

American Legion hosts their annual Holiday Boutique that benefits veterans, military troops and their families

All proceeds throughout the evening benefit veterans, military troops, their families and other Orange County charities.

The evening is open to the public with a $5 entrance fee.

The American Legion Auxiliary Newport Harbor 291 is located at 215 15th St. (on the Peninsula), Newport Beach.


Canned food goods drive at Segerstrom Center for the Arts runs throughout Moulin Rouge!

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is joining in to host the Can-Can Canned Food Drive throughout the run of Moulin Rouge! The Musical.

The drive will help the Orange County Food Bank fully stock its shelves with canned food goods for those in-need. All patrons, attending Moulin Rouge! The Musical are encouraged to donate canned goods to help the nearly 20% of children in Orange County living in “food insecure” households. 

The effort truly puts Moulin Rouge! The Musical’s four values of Truth, Beauty, Freedom, and Love into practice, while Segerstrom Center is excited to involve the community in one harmonious effort to cultivate compassion and reduce food insecurity throughout the county. 

Canned food drive Moulin Rouge!

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

Austin Durant and the cast of the North American Tour of “Moulin Rouge!”

Along with the public, Center staff will exercise the musical’s core values, too, and contribute to the food drive by having an internal contest to see which department can collect the most canned goods. In August, during the Hadestown run, more than 2,000 pounds of canned food were collected. The Center is determined to beat that number and spread Truth, Beauty, Freedom and Love throughout the community.    

Moulin Rouge! The Musical runs through November 27. 

Donation bins will be on-site provided by the OC Food Bank throughout the main lobby of Segerstrom Hall. 

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


ENC brings in their 2022 Artisans Marketplace in early December for special holiday shopping 

Here’s something sure to get you in a holiday mood. The shop local 2022 Artisans Marketplace will come to the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Shop for handmade and vintage gifts from 50+ local artisans offering a variety of eco-friendly, sustainable, products. Your friends and family will love that you cared enough about them to think about their planet when you purchased their unique gift. 

ENC brings vendor

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Courtesy of ENC

Shop for handmade and vintage gifts from 50+ local artisans

Enjoy art, music and other fun.

And what better way to indulge in a day of shopping than to do it with nature surrounding you.

There’s a $2 entry fee that goes directly to the environmental education programs.

Come hungry to enjoy great food vendors…and, if you bring your own reusable plates and utensils which helps to save the planet, you’ll receive a raffle ticket and be entered to win one of two fabulous prizes.

To learn more about the Artisans Marketplace, click here.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.encenter.org.


ENC to hold Fall Rain Barrel & Native Plant Sale, guided Native Plant Uses Walk

Join the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) this Saturday, Nov. 12 for the Rain Barrel Sale, Fall Native Plant Sale and guided Native Plant Uses Walk. 

ENC to hold fall rain barrels

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Photos courtesy of ENC

Rain barrels are 39 inches tall and 23 inches in diameter

On Saturday morning, take advantage of the Rain Barrel Sale from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Only rain barrels ordered in advance are guaranteed to be available. Rain barrels are re-used food-grade plastic barrels with a solid brass 3/4-inch spigot for garden hose attachment & side brass overflow. A four-inch mesh no-see-um screen is riveted to the top, preventing bugs from accessing the water. Cost: $85 each, plus tax and $20 is donated back to the ENC. Residents are eligible for a $35 rebate per rain barrel; limit two. For more information and to pre-order, go here. For questions, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

ENC to hold fall plant sale

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Fall’s cooling air temperatures and warm soil are ideal for establishing new plants

Next up is the Fall Native Plant Sale, taking place from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Compared to spring-planted plants, which suffer a period of transplant shock, plants installed in the fall grow rapidly in the spring – with both substantial root growth, and more vigorous top growth and flowering. With a more established root system, fall-planted trees and shrubs are much better able to handle the harsh, drying winds of spring and the withering heat of summer. Take advantage of this rain and plant natives this fall. To view the list of plants featured at the upcoming plant sale and for more information about the benefits of fall planting, go here.

ENC to hold fall plant uses walk

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Broen will discuss traditional and modern uses of plants, how you can tell a lot about plants through your senses, plant folklore and more

Then from 12-1:30 p.m., join herbalist William Broen for a Native Plant Uses Walk. Broen will be discussing traditional and modern uses of plants as well as how a plant’s survival tactics affect how they are used, how you can tell a lot about plants through your senses, plant folklore and other related topics. His walks are informative, interactive, accessible, fun and understandable. Cost: $9 for ENC members; $10 for non-members. Pre-registration is required, so to register, go here.

The Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.encenter.org.


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

The shelter is grateful to introduce you to the sweetest and silkiest kitten, their dear Oliver. He’s absolutely endearing. They’ve been working through a little eye infection with him, but that’s not unusual for kittens that come into a shelter environment underage. Currently, open-hearted Oliver is approximately 10 weeks in age. He loves to play with his cage mates but would most love affections from his one and only human. If Oliver was classified into a breed type, given his fur texture, he’s probably an angora Turkish van, white and brown tabby mix. Oliver is a very kind boy who enjoys lots of pets as long as you move slowly with him. His soul is gentle. If you are interested in meeting this truly best boy, please feel free to contact the shelter at 949.718.3454, or through email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The staff will try their best to respond the same day.

Pet of the Week Oliver

Courtesy of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Oliver

In addition, they have a great new professional photographer who is donating her time to help the shelter get the best out of their pet guests. They invite you to visit Andrea Domjan’s IG page at @andrea_domjan_photography to see all of her fabulous photography that she shares with the world. 

The shelter does require completed application forms for their animals, so simply print one up from their non-profit’s webpage at www.FONBAS.org. After it is completed, you can email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and upon review, they’ll call you to schedule an appointment. If you have any questions, call 949.718.3454.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

–Rabbits - $45

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner-surrendered domestic pets.


Residents have a lot to be thankful for, but let’s be honest, one of those things is tourism

By GARY SHERWIN

Things are looking good financially for the City of Newport Beach these days with a projected surplus of at least $24 million. If you are a city official, you’ve got to be smiling.

Much of that largeness is due to the excellent performance of the hospitality industry, which has overperformed with high average daily rates which has exceeded projections. And that is even with the continued closure of the 295-room Fashion Island Hotel which is being transformed into the Pendry.

Also credited with padding that surplus is retail tax, which is also tied to the tourism industry. 

All of that has allowed the city to purchase the future headquarters near the airport for the Police Department and replace its aging infrastructure. If you are a resident of the city and wonder if tourism has benefits for you, here’s a great example. 

Gary Sherwin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

The numbers are indicating that after a difficult few years, tourism locally may have finally recovered. However (there is always a however), it’s a bit of a “Yes, but” situation. And overall, I’ve been hesitant to make that claim until we have the Pendry online.

But here is what changes the equation. Tourism is made up of several parts which include leisure visitors, a market segment which continued to be strong even during the pandemic. The fact that people still chose to come visit and pay elevated rates is what has sustained us.

The one segment that took the biggest hit with the pandemic were meetings and conventions, the lifeblood of many of the hotels in town. While we have been getting by successfully with people simply coming to enjoy our city, group business is what really pays the bills.

Without the meetings business, most of the largest hotels can’t meet their financial goals. Remember that in addition to a large block of booked rooms, meetings also bring important food and beverage revenue which goes to support the bottom line.

Even as the pandemic eased, business meetings were slow to ramp back up since attendees were still COVID skittish and many gatherings went virtual. Most analysts were saying that any recovery probably wouldn’t occur for another two years at the earliest.

Like most projections on everything these days, they were wrong. The meetings industry has made a remarkable return and is nearly at peak 2019 levels. Many area hotels are reporting strong demand this fall and well into next year.

Many analysts said that 2023 will be about growth and not recovery. By most measures, the meetings industry has experienced a strong comeback and by next Spring, it is expected to be beyond pre-pandemic levels.

Yes, you can expect some conditions. A possible recession is looming, there is inflation as well as staffing challenges, but most companies seem eager to get people back together and that’s great news for our hotels.

Financial and pharmaceutical firms are particularly active in booking business, which is an important and extremely lucrative market segment for Newport Beach. 

In a recent American Express Meetings and Events survey, meeting planners were asked about their optimism for the industry in the next year. Despite some possible headwinds, planners rated their outlook an 8 on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being best. That’s a huge comeback.

Many companies are trying to not only engage with customers after sitting on the sideline for the last few years, but also want to get their employees back in the same room. There’s a clear emphasis on the importance of internal meetings as companies look to restore culture and improve communication dynamics among disparate teams who have been working at home.

While bookings are growing, the one aspect still to recover is overall attendance. Most companies are anticipating attendee levels to be about 85-90% of pre-pandemic levels next year, with a full recovery within the next two years. That means we get a lot of our group business back, but overall room night growth will be a bit slower.

Conversely, the rooms that are sold, will be at much higher rates, offsetting the lower attendance. That’s part of the sales strategy for the new VEA Newport Beach. The hotel is now 100 rooms smaller than before the transformation that was completed this year, but each room sold will be priced considerably higher.

In fact, in a recent study by GBTA/CWT Global Business Forecast, the 2022 cost per attendee is expected to be 25% higher than in 2019 and is likely to rise another 7% next year. That price increase is being driven by price hikes on everything from meeting space to room rates, food and beverage, as well as production costs.

Ugly inflation is largely due to that, but many planners are not deterred. They are moving ahead and paying higher rates because the need to get together is so important right now.

Newport Beach is also well positioned since we have only smaller meetings that usually attract more affluent customers. And attendees are still combining fun and work by extending their stays. That really plays to our city’s reputation as a place to enjoy yourself after the work is done.

So, is the tourism recovery complete? Well, not quite. The international market still needs to gain its footing although we are seeing improvements as COVID wanes. Depending on the global economy next year, we’ll see if that market rebounds as much as we hope.

As the new city council takes their seats next month, they can primarily thank the hospitality industry for making their job much easier with robust revenues that improve the quality of life for everyone in town.

And that my friends, is why tourism is important to Newport Beach.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


On the Harbor: Ben Benjamin will be missed

By LEN BOSE

I started this past Monday taking a huge punch in the gut, realizing that a very good friend of mine and our harbor had passed away in his sleep Saturday night. The punch lingers because Ben Benjamin was only 48 years old with a wife Carolyn and three very young kids – Liam, Ella and Abby.

I first met Benjamin when I was the Fleet Captain at the Balboa Yacht Club while he was the sailing administrator. We worked together daily becoming good friends on and off the water. For about a year, we would meet up on Monday mornings and ride our bikes around the Back Bay. He was always competitive on the water and while we were riding, “You do pretty good for an old guy,” said Benjamin, as we ground up the Castaways hill off of PCH and Dover.

More than once, Benjamin would say to me: “I don’t think that idea is going to fly Len.” We had a strong working relationship and quickly became good friends. After Benjamin left the club and started his family, he started to show up at the Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s Thursday Summer Series sailing a Lehman 12 with his two kids at that time, Liam and Ella. I would receive a heartfelt greeting that was engaged with a whistle followed up with a hearty “Len Bose!” I admired that Benjamin sailed with his kids and I always felt it was more to him about being on the water with them rather than winning the series.

On the Harbor Team Benjamin Ben and Liam

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Courtesy of Larry Parker

(L-R) Team Benjamin – Ben and Liam Benjamin sailing a Lehman 12

My time with Benjamin was short and I placed a couple of calls to people that had spent more time with him than I had. My first call was to Becky Lenhart. It was interesting that Becky started our conversion exactly how I felt, “Biggest punch in the gut; the world is just different without him,” Lenhart said. They had known each other before Lenhart started working alongside Benjamin. “Larger than life personality, he could be the boss, disciplinarian, he can also be so goofy, I remember the funny Ben times more than anything else,” Lenhart said. I asked Becky how he affected her life while they worked together. “He trusted me to be in charge, he gave me the confidence to complete the job,” Lenhart said. Becky and I both recalled when Benjamin’s mother had passed away how many of his friends attended his mother’s services. We recalled the church was huge with all of the back rows being filled with sailors showing Benjamin our support for his loss. Toward the end of our conversion, Lenhart said, “Your life was just better if he was in it. This has been a huge wake-up call for me, something tells me as the wind whistles around my office windows I am going to look up and see him helping me.”

My next call was into Jacob Ullman. He and Benjamin had been close friends since the high school sailing team at Newport Harbor High. “There was word coming in from the sailing coaches that this sailor was returning to the area and he would be sailing on the team next year. His name is Ben Benjamin. I did not know who Ben Benjamin was and what type of silly name was that having the same name twice,” Ullman said. “He moved in a block away from us and we slowly became close friends realizing that we both loved this harbor, and the Grateful Dead, constantly interacting with each other from then on.”

Ullman went on to say they taught sailing together for many summers at NHYC – he was a really good sailor, Snipes, FJ and the 505. Benjamin was a very accomplished 505 crew sailing in many world events and finishing at the top of many regattas. According to Ullman, “A couple of weeks ago, Benjamin called and asked if my daughter Skylar would like to join them for a junior sabot sailing regatta in San Diego. Up until that time, Skylar preferred not to race, yet after returning from a weekend with the Benjamins, Skylar had the biggest smile on her face. She had the best weekend and commented that she wants to go on every traveling regatta she can with them. Ben made this all happen, picking up the boat, and providing rooms and meals just as if she was one of the family. When I asked what I owed him he replied, ‘You’re Good!’ That was just the way he was. He liked kids, had patience, he was able to present himself as understanding and not intimidating. He really had that ability to relate to kids. The kids loved to be with him. I admired his generosity and commitment to his kids; I need to do more to make that happen,” Ullman said.

Benjamin will be missed. I am sure we will all be at peace with the understanding that “You’re Good,” Ben Benjamin!

Friends of the family have set up a GoFundMe page at Ben Benjamin and Family.

Sea ya! 

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


School Notes

Does someone in the school district deserve special recognition? Now’s the time to nominate them

Nominations are being accepted through Tuesday, Dec. 6, for the Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s (NMUSD) Employee Excellence Award Program. 

This is the community’s opportunity to nominate an employee who contributes to and enhances the district’s mission to create a positive environment for students, staff and community; and continuously displays initiative, going above and beyond in their work with a high degree of excellence, professionalism and integrity.

Anyone can nominate an employee.

To receive consideration for this recognition, nominated employees must have been at their current position for at least one year and have not received this award in the past five years.

To nominate an employee, fill out the nomination form in its entirety by December 6.


Take Five: Meet Ron Salisbury, grandson of the founders of the nearly 100-year-old El Cholo

By AMY SENK

The new year is going to be huge for Newport Beach resident Ron Salisbury, the grandson of the founders of El Cholo, who will be turning 90 years old and also celebrating El Cholo’s 100th anniversary in 2023. A native of Los Angeles, Salisbury was born in 1933 and grew up in the restaurant business after his parents, George and Aurelia Salisbury, opened the first El Cholo in 1927 near the brand-new L.A. Coliseum and in the same year that the Hollywood sign was erected. The restaurant, which remains the third oldest continuously operating Mexican restaurant in the country, expanded to six locations, and during Salisbury’s 68-year-long career, he founded a company called The Restaurant Business, Inc., which also operates The Cannery and Louie’s by the Bay in Newport Beach. I caught up with him to learn more.

Take Five Meet Ron Salisbury sitting at fireplace

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Photos courtesy of El Cholo

El Cholo owner Ron Salisbury

Q: What are your earliest memories of El Cholo, and when did you start working there?

A: The restaurant on Western (Avenue) was there before I was born. I spent a lot of time there as a 2- or 3-year-old. You know how you have these memories of life, maybe running across a lawn, playing with a certain friend and that’s your first memory? Some of my very first memories are actually being right in the restaurant. The smells, the feelings that I had, the conversations that I heard going on around me. Probably at age 3 or 4, I learned to count by my mother. I distinctly remember sitting at the cash register, and she was giving me coins and teaching me how to count by putting coins in the register. That’s a very vivid memory. I came from parents who came up during the Depression and life was very different then. Everything was really focused on family and business, if you had a business. They were all really integrated, so I remember being there from the time I was born. My parents introducing me to someone who, at that time, was a celebrity that they thought I should meet and get their autograph. I remember how in those days, the butter came in large cubes, and the waiters had to cut it into smaller cubes with these little steel things that had wires through it. One time a waiter said, “If you eat this quarter pound of butter, I’ll give you a dollar.” That was a lot of money, and I can remember trying to eat the quarter pound of butter and getting sick. Then by 12 or 13, when a worker didn’t show up, you’d fill their roles. After school, in junior high, I’d come in sometimes and work when they needed me. Of course, every summer, you truly spent working. That’s what you were supposed to do.

Ron Salisbury with Great Granddaughter Gracie Tidwell

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Ron Salisbury with his great granddaughter, Gracie Tidwell. The photo on the wall is of Ron’s mother, Aurelia, who along with her husband George Salisbury, opened El Cholo on Western Avenue in 1927.

In those days, we would separate the dishes for the dishwasher so they would be handled carefully. The dishwasher could take all one size and wash those. It was much more efficient. My first job was separating the dishes and heating the tortillas. In those days, rather than chips and salsa, traditionally you served hot tortillas with butter, and people would put salsa on it and roll them up. I made the coffee, peeled the onions, separated the seeds from the chilis. Then I graduated to dishwashing, and then onto the steam table, where you would finish the dishes as they came out, and then you’d end up in the kitchen, doing some of the actual early preparation of the dishes. I finally got to be a busser, and ultimately a host, and at 18, my dad let me run the restaurants on certain nights. I did everything. And even then, when you managed, we had a cash register, people would pay at the register rather than pay at the table. And yet, you didn’t just take their cash. When there was no one up there to pay, you could see everything else going on in the restaurant, so you’d go around, and you’d fill up the water glasses, you’d be wrapping take-out orders, keeping an eye on the front desk. You were in fifth gear moving at all times.

Q: What are the highlights of your long restaurant career?

A: It’s been my passion, my obsession, and out of that comes incredible moments. Incredible times bonding with the staff. And as you get older, you realize that money is not the thing. There will be a reward, and the thrill of seeing something get better and better. I’ve gotten to meet some really interesting people and been incorporated into their lives. I’ll give you one quick story. Do you know baseball? Do you know who Nolan Ryan is? Well, this is a great story. Years ago, Tom Seaver was a student at USC, and when he went to pitch for the Mets, when they’d come to town, he always would bring a ballplayer with him at lunchtime before a game. And one day I was in there, and he said, “I’d like you to meet Nolan Ryan. I bring him along to shine my shoes.” He was 19 years old. So I met Nolan. Then when he came to the Angels, he and his wife, Ruth, came to dinner at El Cholo in La Habra, and I was up there, and I walked to the table and said, “Hey, we’ve met before,” and we decided to go out and have lunch the next day and we became really close friends.

The end of the story was that I always wondered what the heck it must be like to be a baseball player and face him. In his last season, I said that I would really like to know what it’s like, and he said to come and stay with him during spring training. And one night during spring training, he came and brought a catcher and proceeded to pitch to me, and I got to understand and see and experience what a Major League baseball player is faced with. We brought a camera out. And he threw it slowly enough that I was able to actually get the bat on the ball. My hands hurt for weeks afterwards, but I did get the bat on the ball. Then he said, “OK. Now I’m working on my eighth no-hitter. It’s two outs, bottom of the ninth. You’re the last batter I have to face, and I’ve got to get you out. I’m going to show you everything I have because I so much want to get you out.” It was a blur. I honestly was just aware of a blur going by me. And I could tell you other stories that are like that, but that’s my favorite. But that is what the restaurant’s done for me. I was just a kid, was young, had a hard time getting dates in high school, wasn’t a good athlete, wasn’t a good student. And life turned out pretty darned good for me. 

Take Five Meet Ron Salisbury three waiters

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Three waiters at El Cholo, circa 1927

Q: What is your favorite thing on the El Cholo menu and what should a patron order on a first visit?

A: There’s always the story that my mother, when she went to work for her dad when he opened up the first El Cholo, she always ate the first enchilada. That has always stayed in my mind, so when we open an El Cholo, my youngest son and I traditionally sit down and share an enchilada, and I put the plate up on the wall. So, when I go to El Cholo and I feel nostalgic and I just want something that tastes good, I have an enchilada with a fried egg on top. When I was working and running an El Cholo, I always ate the No. 2 – that’s the enchilada, the relleno, beans and rice. I would eat that three nights in a row, then I’d have a tostada, then I’d go back to the No. 2. That’s really my favorite. The filet mignon tacos are exceptional. The Taste of History plate, which gives you a small sample of all four – enchilada, taco, relleno, tamale and rice and beans – is a really good starter, because those are the basic items the menu is built around.

Take Five Meet Ron Salisbury Nicholson

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(L-R) Ron Salisbury and Jack Nicholson at El Cholo in the 1970s. Nicholson was a longtime regular patron who began eating at the restaurant in the ‘50s, before he became famous. He dined there hundreds of times and became friends with Ron.

Q: Tell me about your book reading program and the book you wrote?

A: You’ve touched on the thing I’m obsessed about. I could talk for 24 hours on it. I read a lot, and I read a lot of books that impact my life. And one of my favorite sayings is that we are all changed by the books we read, the people we meet and the places we’ve been to. Those impact our lives. So, if there is a book that I think could change your life, that has a lot of substance, we put it on a reading list and we offer it to all the staff. There are probably about 60 books on the list – business, sociology, history. There are some novels on there, some novels by Hemingway and Fitzgerald. I think history is one of the best teachers. You read the book, and I’ll pay you either $25, $50 or $100 depending on the size of the book, and then you write me a two-page report on what you’ve learned from it and how that book has improved your life. We push that strongly for two reasons. One is I feel you come to a job, you get hired, you settle in, you think, “Hey, I got the job.” Well, the message I want to send is, yes, you have a job, but as a human being and a member of the staff, we expect you to continue to get better, because that’s what human beings do. That’s what they should be doing. You should be improving. So, the message is that we expect you to continue to improve. The other thing is, if I did anything well in life, I coached youth baseball, and my goal always was to teach the kids to be better people as a result of having played for me. I’m too old now to coach baseball, so this is the continuation.

When you leave working for us, I want you to be a better person, and the world is better, and you are now a better person. I wrote a book about my life. I called it Out of Right Field, because I was always the kid who was stuck out in right field because that is where I could do the least damage. It was kind of a testimonial that life did turn out well, and it could turn out well for anybody if they focus on it and hopefully do the right things. Another book I also wrote is What They Don’t Teach You at the C.I.A., meaning the Culinary Institute of America. After all these years – I’ve been doing this for 69 years now – I’ve just accumulated all these stories and bits of wisdom in how you do things better in the restaurant, here’s a better way of doing things. And so, I just put them into little anecdotes and wrote the book. Hopefully, it’s a book that young people will read and people who own businesses will read, and it will give them a better idea of how to operate and succeed. I’ll never make any money out of the books, but my whole goal is to get people to read them. I’ve been told that the book is about common sense, and there’s a lot more to the book then just running a restaurant. 

Take Five Meet Ron Salisbury host and hostess

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The host and hostess at El Cholo on Western Avenue, 2010

Take Five Meet Ron Salisbury Tacos al Carbon

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A menu favorite, Tacos al Carbon – marinated top sirloin with bacon, jack cheese and tomatillo-chipotle salsa

Q: What do you have planned to celebrate 100 years?

A: We want to enjoy as much as we can and do creative things. If you’re 100 years old, you eat free all year long. We’re bringing back some of the old dishes that were dropped off of the menu for one reason or another. And there’s another good story. There’s an omelet we made, it was made similar to the relleno, but you’d put the whipped egg on top of the fryer and then you keep turning it so it would seal and puff up like a football. It was such a showy piece that people were ordering it, and one time for lunch, we had 23 people order it, and because it’s so time consuming to make, the whole dining room just fell apart. We couldn’t deliver food to people that day. It became so popular, we took it off the menu. Rather than it wasn’t selling so we took it off, it was very popular. So we’re bringing those things back. We’re going to have special events during the year to celebrate. It’s a great opportunity to do something special, so we’re going to raise a million dollars for children’s research for cancer. We’re going to use the restaurant’s 100th anniversary as a vehicle to do that. I feel really good about that. I run into so many people who want to tell me their El Cholo story, how it impacted their life. We’ve been creating memories for 100 years. 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.

Editor’s Note: El Cholo is located at 3520 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


City moves forward with purchase of $30.5 million property for future police station

By SARA HALL

Following a City Council decision this week, the city is moving forward with due diligence to purchase a property in the airport area as the potential site for a future police station replacement facility.

Councilmembers voted 5-1 on Tuesday (Nov. 15) to move forward with the purchase of the property at 1201 Dove St. for $30.5 million. The action also approved utilizing FY 2021-22 year-end general fund surplus and unallocated capital project reserve funds to pay for it.

Mayor Kevin Muldoon dissented and Councilmember Diane Dixon was absent.

In explaining his vote against the item, Muldoon said that it’s more about the timing of the market rather than the site itself. 

“I actually think this is the best location, given the proximality to both sides of the bay, I just think we’re in for a large correction in the commercial real estate market,” Muldoon said. “So I’ll be dissenting for the sake of timing, but I think that staff has picked a good location.”

 He also noted how long the idea of moving the police station has been discussed, recalling that he was asked where it should go during a council candidate forum eight years ago.

Muldoon also commented on the hard work staff has done in getting this deal. 

They’ve been working on the deal for more than six months, said Community Development Director Seimone Jurjis. It’s just the beginning of the process, he added. There is a 120-day period for due diligence and then a 30-day closing.

“It allows us to kind of ‘kick the tires’ of the property,” Jurjis said. “Really inspect this property and look and see if this is the opportunity that we want for the city for the future police station.”

Answering a council question, Jurjis confirmed the city can cancel if an issue comes up during due diligence. 

“If any of the due diligence items comes back to us that we are not comfortable with then we would communicate with the city manager and recommend to cancel the escrow,” he explained. 

During the due diligence period, the city would conduct a variety of condition assessments of the property (both the building and the site), review the cash flow and expenses, and conduct an appraisal, said Real Property Administrator Lauren Wooding Whitlinger.

City moves forward with purchase current police station

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Courtesy of NBPD

The current Newport Beach Police Department headquarters 

The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) is currently headquartered on the city-owned property at 870 Santa Barbara Drive. The building is within 10 years of the end of its useful life, and NBPD operations have outgrown the existing facility. The police facility is slated for replacement in the Capital Improvement Plan within the next 10 years, Whitlinger explained.

The current site of police headquarters on Santa Barbara was acquired by the city in 1973 from The Irvine Company, Whitlinger explained. The facility was constructed according to the building code standards of that time. Since then, the seismic structural design requirements have changed for facilities considered “essential” (police, fire, hospitals) and are now designed to a much higher seismic standard than non-essential buildings. NBPD shares the four-acre parcel with fire station no. 3.

“While it is possible to structurally upgrade the existing police station, it is more cost effective to replace the building due to the future facility space and utilization needs,” the staff report reads. “A new police station facility will be structurally designed to the highest seismic standard required by the building codes.”

While the facility and property have been maintained and remodeled over the last 50 years, NBPD operations have expanded and effectively outgrown the site, according to staff. 

“The city has a need to replace the existing police station with a larger more modern facility that will meet the future needs of the police department,” the report reads.

Public works evaluated the existing police station and future needs, Whitlinger said. They determined a future police facility will require a minimum of 73,000 square feet (current space sits at 49,284 square feet of gross floor area) to accommodate the department’s expanded operations, she noted. 

“We’ve kind of anticipated this project coming forward in the next 10 years and have kept an eye out for any available properties in the city that meet the anticipated needs,” she said. 

The differences between the existing facility and the future needs of the police department include adequate space for the patrol division, and an appropriately laid-out firearms training and shooting range.

Staff considered replacing the existing NBPD station at its current location, but determined the replacement cost would outweigh the costs to relocate the facility to a new location. Costs for redevelopment on-site would include temporarily relocating police operations during construction, including jail services and the helicopter landing pad.

 There are not a lot of available properties that are three acres and none are available in the airport area, Whitlinger added. The property owner approached the city with an off-market deal, she noted.

The Dove Street property is located in the airport area on a 3.59-acre site currently developed with an 82,868-square-foot, six-story office building. The building was constructed in 1973 and underwent a major renovation in 1989, with various system upgrades and maintenance and tenant improvements completed since then. The property was acquired by AG Dove Owner, L.P. an institutional investor, in 2018. 

NBPD and other city staff toured the Dove Street property in March and determined the general location, size, and configuration to be sufficient and appropriate for development of a new police station. Access to the property is located on Dove Street, and staff will work with the adjacent property owners to determine if a secondary point of access to Quail Street can be obtained.

The building on the Dove Street property is currently 84% leased to 21 tenants for finance, healthcare, real estate, legal, and other services and uses. 

Staff proposed the city continue leasing the office spaces. The positive cash flow will offset the cost of purchase, Jurjis said. 

The projected net income is $15 million to $25 million for the next 10 to 15 years. The net income is based on projected rental revenues minus all operating expenses and building management costs. The income revenue from the property will be deposited in the city’s general fund account.

Whitlinger also mentioned projections for market rent growth.

“We’re looking at a dip in the market next year, possibly a small recession. Beyond that, the average rent growth for the Newport Beach market and the Orange County market is anticipated to be 2-3% per year,” Whitlinger said. 

The vacancy rate for properties in Newport Beach is relatively low, she noted. Similar three-star properties show vacancy rates between 8-9%, which is better than the citywide or countywide average, Whitlinger explained.

The property management expense is also factored into the estimated net revenues.

The current property manager (Lincoln Property) is paid a fee of 2.5% of the gross rental income for the property. The current contract expires next August, Whitlinger said. The city would anticipate issuing an RFP for a new management contract, which would return to council at a future meeting.

There would be two earnest money deposits of 1% ($305,000), each that would be applicable to the purchase price. The fees and closing costs would be shared between the seller and the city, and the city would cover the cost of the owner’s title policy.

The purchase price, due diligence, and closing costs total of $30.775 million would be covered through use of the FY 2021-22 year-end general fund surplus of $24.1 million and $6.7 million from available funds in the Facilities Financial Planning fund and Capital Improvement Plan fund.

It is anticipated the FFP and CIP funds will be replenished from general fund surplus at the end of FY 2022-23. In a separate council action on Tuesday, the FY 2021-22 year-end general fund surplus was transferred to the police facility fund.

In addition to the purchase price of the property and due diligence costs, staff anticipates closing costs of less than $10,000, an owner’s policy of title insurance policy premium cost of approximately $15,000 and prorated property taxes of $175,000 or less (which will be refunded by the County of Orange after closing).

For the future council, if they’re interested in entitling the existing Santa Barbara property, staff believes the site will have an anticipated value of $55 million, Whitlinger said. 

Or if the decision changes over the next decade, the city could sell the Dove Street property, she said. With the expected income from the property and that increasing over the next 10 years, at a 5% CAP rate the value will be approximately $52 million, Whitlinger explained. 

 “This is a strategic plan to purchase and hold the property for the 10 years,” Whitlinger said. “Aside from having a willing seller and this particular property having the characteristics that we’re looking for for a replacement facility, there is a strong demand for properties in the airport area. And this particular property actually has a positive cash flow of approximately $1.2 million a year.”

Next steps include proceeding with the purchase agreement, opening escrow and paying the deposit, Whitlinger explained. After conducting their due diligence, the city will pay the second deposit and then close escrow. 

The only public comment on the item was city watchdog Jim Mosher who noted that it appeared the council held several closed sessions discussing the property, but there was no recent public discussion about the desirability to move the police headquarters. There was some talk a number of years ago, including the idea of moving it to the corporation yard on Superior Avenue, he pointed out, but there should have been more recent public discussion. 

He also commented that moving the police department away from its current location, either to the corporation yard or to the airport area, creates an “uncomfortable disconnect” with city hall. It may not be the greatest idea, he added. 

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Twelve weeks of experiencing the inner workings of the NBPD and worth every minute of it

TJ headshot AugLast Wednesday evening (Nov. 16), I finished the Newport Beach Citizens Police Academy. Does that mean you’ll see me in a police car on the streets of our fair city in the future? Well, only if I’m riding in the back…so, no that won’t happen.

But the Academy is a 12-week program offered through the Newport Beach Police Department, giving citizens a very up-close look behind the inner workings.

I’ll be honest, the 12 weeks have flown by. And, although each participant had to commit three hours a week (Wednesdays from 6:30-9:30 p.m.), I would bet that all would do it again, in a heartbeat!

So, what did we learn or experience: 

Week 1 started with a program intro, meeting the 25 or so classmates, receiving a Station Tour and such.

Week 2 went through such topics as NBPD Recruitment and Hiring, Surviving an Active Shooter and understanding the value of our School Resource Officers on our local campuses.

And, before we leave the recruitment and hiring, be assured, before one of our officers gets a gun and a badge, there is a tremendous amount of process behind their actual hiring. We’re talking months!

This detail explains why our department employs the best of the best and why people from all around want to come to Newport Beach.

Week 3 reviews things like the department’s Front Desk responsibilities, the detail of the Records Department and why their work is so important to ultimate convictions of those criminals breaking our laws. 

Then we heard from the detectives explaining Crimes Against Persons...what these are and what we’re doing about them. We also heard about the Volunteer Program and how a number of people going through the class can/will join following their graduation.

Week 4 moved out of the conference room for the first of our outside experiences. We met with our Motor Officers (think motorcycles) to find out their responsibilities, what’s equipped on their bikes and how they differ in responsibility from a patrol vehicle (think police car).

Those same motorcycle officers then take us to the corner of Santa Barbara Drive and Jamboree Road to teach us the skills of using a Radar Gun. You think it’s easy, try it? It’s actually an art. Trust me, it’s difficult to master.

It was an absolute kick trying to hold the gun and “hit” an approaching vehicle, attempting to get their speed registered in a matter of mere seconds.

Then it was back inside to discuss Crime Scene Investigation, which was truly fascinating. 

In case you don’t know this, for a crime that needs further investigation, initial police units arrive to arrest, secure and apprise the situation…then, the crime scene investigators arrive and take over in an attempt to put together a case that will stand up in court for when the criminal eventually goes to trial.

Fact – one simple oversight can be the difference between a conviction and a potential criminal walking free.

Week 6 was a discussion by our city’s Animal Control/Animal Shelter…what they encounter and how they handle issues. Some of it’s funny, some of it’s sad, but all of it is important.

B-t-w, these folks do this out of a love and respect at the highest level for our pets and other animals they encounter.

Following that, we Tour the Jail

Granted, some of our readers, unfortunately, have already seen what we’re now seeing, and shame on them, but we learn and understand the entire process of arrest, fingerprinting, the confines of the jails, etc.

Personally, I hope I never see it again…if you catch my drift.

On to Week 7 and we shoot our class photo. And trust me, some of those you meet in class will become longtime friends moving forward. 

From there we head to one of two “experiences” of the evening: the first one is visiting the department’s basement Shooting Range and firing several different pistols. It’s exciting and intimidating!

Fair Game aiming Glock

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Submitted photo

That’s me, aiming an imitation Glock, as NBPD Range Master Vince Kyzer checks out my form 

For the stars of the class, those demonstrating the best technique and ability, they then have the opportunity to demonstrate use of a taser gun and/or a bazooka-looking device that fires a large rubber projectile, designed to knock an un-responding suspect on his or her “rear-end,” when they’ve left the officer with no other option.

All I can say is that it would hurt! Not only then, but for the days to follow.

The other experience is a Vehicle Stop. In this one, you’re given a scenario in the department’s back lot and you move from the driver’s seat of a police vehicle, approach a car “you’ve pulled over,” and deal with the incident.

Easier said than done…especially when you encounter a suspect that’s not necessarily cooperating.

This one gets the heart going and you’re left to only imagine what our officers encounter each and every time they stop and then approach an unknown vehicle/occupants…and sometimes, in the dead of night.

We also go through a Fingerprinting exercise…both taking fingerprints and then pulling them from a crime scene.

Lastly, that evening, but equally important, we hear from the Crime Prevention officers that work with our community groups to increase safety in our businesses and neighborhoods.

Week 8 brings in the Detectives to discuss Narcotics, Economic Crimes in the community and Burglaries

Week 9 is a presentation by S.W.A.T. and examples of tactical scenarios. 

B-t-w, if you’re hearing from these guys personally, you already are in trouble. The best thing you can do now is to put up those hands and surrender!

Week 10 is Drunk Driving and the Field Sobriety Exam, Parking Control and a presentation of Newport Beach’s Peninsula Enforcement Team & Homeless Liaison Officer.

Week 11 brings in the all-important Dispatch team…including discussion of the vast number of calls and situations they’re dealing with EVERY DAY. 

Rule number one here…use 9-1-1 properly!! No calls asking, “how to fill up your bathtub because the stopper isn’t working,” or “can you tell me what channel the Super Bowl is on,” or worse. This department, of just two to four employees at a time, handles some 180,000 incoming calls a year. The last thing they need is to have people wasting their time.

Oh, and if you do call them and you feel they can be softer and kinder, remember, they’re busy and they’re saving lives. Not only yours and your neighbors, but those of their fellow officers who are out approaching an unknown potential threatening call/contact.

And then, for our last exercise before graduation, they bring in the DOGS!! Yup, Belgian Malinois, or in our case Ryder and Goose. They are UNBELIEVABLE!! We got a full demo of Goose “taking down” an officer perpetrating a criminal.

Fair Game Police officer and dog

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Submitted photo

Joining Officer Rosenberg and Ryder for a pose

As I related above about S.W.A.T….in this case, if you hear an officer yell, “Surrender or I will send in the dog and HE WILL BITE!” Now’s the time to make a smart decision…perhaps your first one of that day.

Goose and Ryder, I promise, will make you see the light!

So now, Monday is Graduation. It’s truly been a gas.

Two other parts of the class that are unmatched were the Shoot-Don’t Shoot experience, where you use a “paintball” Glock, enter a room after receiving a scenario, and then deal with it. Trust me, you will need the Glock!

And, everyone enjoys the Ride-Along, where you attend the pre-briefing with officers to prepare to go out in the field. Then you accompany an officer for their shift. It’s designed for four hours…most classmates stayed out for the entire eight-hour shift because it was so captivating.

The class will roll around again after the first of the year. I encourage any and all of you to explore it. You will absolutely gain the highest respect possible for our men and women, and dogs, that make up our Newport Beach Police Department.

You may call the department (949.644.3717) for more info…just DON’T call 9-1-1. And be prepared for fingerprints and a background check.

Thank you, Jennifer Manzella, for taking us all through it…thank you NBPD volunteer Judy Johnson for your commitment, passion and dedication to all of us and to the department…and thank you to Chief Jon Lewis for your overall support of the class designed to educate and connect our residents.

• • •

The Professional Tour of Pickleball (PPA Tour) is hosting the Takeya Showcase this weekend out at The Tennis Club at Newport Beach. The tourney started yesterday and runs through Sunday (Nov. 17-20). 

The event will be one of the largest held in California this year. This craze of pickleball is more than a fad. For example, this weekend’s event will be broadcast on the Tennis Channel. Oh, and pickleball was even featured in prime-time television this week with a celebrity pickleball event hosted by Stephen Colbert.

Out at the Takeya Showcase, spectators will be able to see the world’s top pro players. 

The event will also feature nearly 1,000 local and international athletes and feature a professional purse of $146,210 in prize money.

The Tennis Club at Newport Beach is located at 11 Clubhouse Drive, located behind and next to Newport Beach Country Club.

Play takes place 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Spectators can buy tickets for the event at www.tixr.com, starting at $25.

• • •

Continuing tonight (Friday, Nov. 18) through January 2, 2023, fill your evenings with the lively sights and sounds of the Fashion Island beautifully choreographed tree lightings from 5:30-7:30 p.m. every half hour. The exquisitely decorated 90-foot tree comes to life with magical snowfall, music and a choreographed light display in the Neiman-Marcus/Bloomingdale’s Courtyard. What a dazzling way to ring in the holidays!


Celebrate the 32nd Annual Lighting of the Bay

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is kicking off the holiday season with the 32nd Annual Lighting of the Bay opening night celebration featuring a full schedule of festivities on Friday, Nov. 25 from 4-9 p.m. The resort’s nightly bay lighting will continue through New Year’s Day.

On opening night, enjoy live musical performances, stocking decorating, holiday photo booths and more. Santa will take center stage at dusk as he flips the magic switch to illuminate the bay with more than 50 floating holiday decorations and Christmas trees. Once the bay is aglow, children will have the opportunity to meet and take photos with Santa. Guests are invited to bring blankets and beach chairs and to relax while sipping on hot cocoa and cider during an outdoor movie screening of a holiday favorite, Elf (PG), to wrap up the evening. Festive food and beverages will be available for purchase. 

Celebrate the 32nd Annual trees lighted

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Courtesy of Newport Beach

Lighting of the Bay at Newport Dunes

Schedule of Events:

–Holiday Food Concessions & Bar from 4-8 p.m. Clam chowder, chili, churros, and festive drinks are available for purchase. Full bar.

 –Photo Booth from 4-8 p.m.

–Stocking Decorating from 4-7 p.m. (or until supplies last)

–Southern California Brass Consortium from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

–Performance by OC Song & Dance from 5:30-6 p.m.

–Santa’s Arrival and Lighting of the Bay at 6 p.m.

–Photos with Santa from 6:15-8:30 p.m.

–Holiday Movie Screening on the Beach: Elf (PG) after the Lighting of the Bay

 Cost: Lighting of the Bay Opening Night Celebration (Friday, Nov. 25 from 4-9 p.m.), onsite parking is $10. The bay is illuminated each evening at dusk through January 1, 2023 with on-site parking available at the following rates: First 30 minutes are free; 30 minutes to two hours, $10; Two to five hours, $15; five to eight hours $20 and eight to 24 hours, $25.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com.


Visit Newport Beach invites travelers to ring in the season with its 2022 holiday campaign

This week, Visit Newport Beach unveiled its 2022 holiday campaign, “Let It Glow,” which shines a light on the spectacular experiences in Newport Beach for travelers to make the destination their home for the holidays. With dazzling light displays, a flurry of holiday happenings, festive resorts, delightful winter dining, shopping and fun for all ages, Newport Beach is inviting visitors to enjoy one of the most festive coastal destinations in America this season.

“Newport Beach is an incredible destination to experience year-round, but visiting during the holiday season is the most wonderful time of the year to create memorable experiences with your loved ones,” said Gary Sherwin, president & CEO of Visit Newport Beach. “The entire destination transforms into a winter wonderland where every corner is illuminated with over-the-top holiday lights, décor and displays. ‘Let It Glow’ is a nod to this transformation and invites visitors to delight in over-the-top seasonal offerings and experience the must-see 114th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade.”

Visit Newport Beach boat parade

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

The 114th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade takes place December 15-19 on Newport Harbor

“Let It Glow” brings the destination to life through captivating creative and storytelling showcasing all the destination has to offer this season through a variety of media partnerships. Focusing on key markets in Los Angeles, San Diego, Arizona and the Bay Area, the campaign’s omnichannel approach spans digital and print advertising. Visit Newport Beach will air commercials during the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, Nov. 24 in Los Angeles and San Diego via NBC. Broadcast and radio spots are airing with iHeart Media including KOST 103.5 (L.A.’s Official Holiday Music Station), Fox5 San Diego The Localist, and ABC15 Arizona’s Sonoran Living. Other media investments include partnerships with OC Register, Modern Luxury, LOCALE, Firebrand, Stu News, TripAdvisor and Sunset magazine, static and animated display ads and more.

Digital efforts will further extend the reach of the “Let It Glow” campaign with curated content on a campaign landing page that includes a holiday gift guide and itineraries for food lovers, fashionistas, trendsetters, families and couples. Travelers can also follow along on social media for a front-row seat to holiday happenings like Fashion Island’s 90-foot Christmas Tree, the Lighting of the Bay, the Ring of Lights home decorating competition, holiday happenings at local resorts and the crown jewel of the season – the 114th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade.

For more information about the “Let It Glow” holiday campaign, visit www.VisitNewportBeach.com/newport-beach-holiday-hq and follow @VisitNewportBeach on Instagram and Facebook.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

2022 PCISA Anteater Regatta

November 13

Gold Fleet

1 Mater Dei High School, Total 67

2 Point Loma High School, Total 91

3 Point Loma High School, Total 92

4 San Marcos High School, Total 103

5 Point Loma High School, Total 150

6 Mater Dei High School, Total 151

7 Corona del Mar High School, Total 163

8 Coronado Islanders, Total 187

9 Newport Harbor High School, Total 194

10 Mater Dei High School, Total 210

11 San Marcos High School, Total 245

12 Santa Monica High School, Total 252

13 The Bay School of San Francisco, Total 256

14 Parker, Total 257 

15 Newport Harbor High School, Total 269

16 Parker, Total 274

17 Cathedral Catholic High School, Total 281

18 Santa Barbara High School, Total 289

19 Pacific Palisades Charter High School, Total 290

20 Redwood High School, Total 296

21 Mission Bay High School, Total 299

22 Palos Verdes High School, Total 304

23 La Jolla Country Day School, Total 307

24 Corona del Mar High School, Total 311

25 Mira Costa High School, Total 317

26 Parker, Total 344 

27 Mission Bay High School, Total 353

28 St. Ignatius College Prep – San Francisco, Total 377

29 Loyola High School, Total 385

30 Laguna Blanca School, Total 433

31 Bishop’s School, Total 443

32 Dos Pueblos, Total 457

Silver Fleet

1 Corona del Mar High School, Total 68

2 Cathedral Catholic High School, Total 96

3 Stevenson School, Total 154

4 Mission Bay High School, Total 168

5 San Domenico High School, Total 180

6 Los Alamitos High School, Total 189

7 South Torrance High School, Total 190

8 Convent and Stuart Hall High Schools, Total 196

9 Sato Academy of Mathematics and Science, Total 205

10 Design Tech High School, Total 207

11 San Pedro High School, Total 210

12 La Jolla Country Day School, Total 226

13 Design Tech High School, Total 234

14 Tamalpais High School, Total 236

15 Archbishop Riordan, Total 248

16 Menlo-Atherton, Total 256

17 International HS-SF, Total 262

18 Mira Costa High School, Total 278

19 Alameda High School, Total 283

20 Coronado Islanders, Total 285

21 Coastal Academy High School, Total 294

22 Palos Verdes High School, Total 304

23 Stevenson School, Total 311

24 Torrey Pines High School, Total 323

25 Miramonte High School, Total 326

26 The Bay School of San Francisco, Total 340

27 Acalanes High School, Total 351

28 St. John Bosco, Total 352

29 Khan Lab School, Total 395

30 Amador Valley, Total 430

31 Campolindo High School, Total 438

32 Tamalpais High School, Total 462

BYC 

2022 BYC Club Championship

November 12

Overall Harbor 20 (9 sailed)

1 Poopocalypse, A. Steele/S. Steele/M. Steele, BYC, Total 16

2 Only Child, C. Simmons/A. Simmons, BYC, Total 22

3 Moose & Squirrel, Moosmann/Vandervort, BYC, Total 29

4 Lucky Puff, Sears/Lockhart, BYC, Total 36 

5 Aquanesia, M. Bartell/R. Bartell, BYC, Total 45

6 Adios, P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC/Oasis, Total 50

7 Dulce Viento, Boudreaux/Larzelere, BYC, Total 54

BCYC 

2022 Hot Rum Series

November 13

Day 1 Race 1

PHRF ADivision (Distance 3.4)

1 XLR8, Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:33:14, Corrected 0:27:51

2 Problem Child, Rossen, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:33:33, Corrected 0:28:58

3 Violetta, Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:35:59, Corrected 0:29:45

PHRF B Division (Distance 2.8)

1 Radical Departure, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 0:29:20, Corrected 0:22:59

2 Miss Informed, Tighe, BYC

   Elapsed 0:30:31, Corrected 0:23:31

3 Painted Lady, Foreman, BYC

   Elapsed 0:31:28, Corrected 0:23:38

4 Turkana II, Barnes, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:33:44, Corrected 0:26:19

5 Lickity Split, Whittingham WSA

   Elapsed 0:37:07, Corrected 0:30:57

PHRF C Division (Distance 2.2)

1 Carioca, Wine, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:25:44, Corrected 0:18:09

2 Valkyrie, Albrecht, SSYC 

   Elapsed 0:28:09, Corrected 0:19:19

3 Bella Rose, Henigman, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:28:41, Corrected 0:20:37

4 Halcyon 3, Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:29:31, Corrected 0:21:27

Day 1 Race 2

PHRF A  Division (Distance 4.0)

1 XLR8, Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:34:44, Corrected 0:28:24

2 Violetta, Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:37:10, Corrected 0:29:50

3 Problem Child, Rossen, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:35:27, Corrected 0:30:03

PHRF B Division (Distance 4.0)

1 Radical Departure, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 0:37:42, Corrected 0:28:38

2 Miss Informed, Tighe, BYC

   Elapsed 0:40:03, Corrected 0:30:03

3 Painted Lady, Foreman, BYC

   Elapsed 0:42:29, Corrected 0:31:17

4 Turkana II, Barnes, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:43:03, Corrected 0:32:27

5 Lickity Split, Whittingham WSA

   Elapsed 0:43:34, Corrected 0:34:46

PHRF C Division (Distance 2.8)

1 Carioca, Wine, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:31:03, Corrected 0:21:23

2 Valkyrie, Albrecht, SSYC 

   Elapsed 0:34:09, Corrected 0:22:54

3 Bella Rose, Henigman, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:33:48, Corrected 0:23:32

4 Halcyon 3, Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:34:39, Corrected 0:24:23

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


School Notes

Real life on-campus work experience prepares local high schoolers for future careers

Opening the door to Room A1 on the Back Bay High School campus is like opening the door to a working print shop in the “real world.” The walls are covered with a blue and gray fire-retardant vinyl wallpaper emblazoned with gears and other graphics. Professional machines for embroidering, engraving, cutting, sublimation and more line the room, each one below an acrylic sign that announces what that area does. Spools of vinyl and thread hang from pegs in a corner; in another corner sits a collection of 3D printers. A dry erase job-tracking board is half-filled with assignments. Examples of what can be done with the equipment are mounted on the wall above computers loaded with design programs. 

This is the Spyder Lab, the only one of its kind in Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD). Spyder Lab is a work-based school program that prepares students for entrepreneurship and graphic media careers through a student-run business.

The process to bring Spyder Lab to Back Bay began in early 2020, but it wasn’t until funding from a state Career Technical Education Initiative Grant (CTEIG) was in place that everything accelerated. School administrators and teachers met to secure a location on campus, and Career Counseling Coordinator Lisa Snowden began writing a curriculum that utilized the Spyder Lab as the focal point of a Business Management Career Technical Education (CTE) pathway. During the summer of 2022, district staff and the Spyder Lab team transformed Room A1 into an exciting place to learn. 

“It’s such an exciting place with students often asking if they can pop in during breaks, lunch or after school to train on the equipment or work on a project,” said teacher Jason Kovac. 

Back Bay High School Senior Davian Gonzalez is quickly earning certifications to use the Spyder Lab equipment and studies more every chance he gets. “This class makes me want to come to school. It’s shown me I don’t have to work a 9-to-5 job, but that I can learn business skills, get a good-paying job and start my own business someday,” he said. 

Students must learn how each piece of equipment works before they can use it. Then they must show proficiency on paper and on the machine itself to gain certification. The same is true for using the accounting software QuickBooks®. There are three tiers to each certification: essential, intermediate and advanced. With each level, the students refine and apply their skills, increasing students’ interest and dedication to the program.

In addition to obtaining certifications, students develop academic skills. For example, math ratios and color theory are applied when designing logos. Creating 3D objects exercises engineering abilities. Spatial skills come to the forefront when cutting a row of stickers for distribution. Before graphic T-shirts can be produced, designs must be proofread. The students’ vocabulary changes as they learn technical terms as well as how to speak professionally.

“The greatest asset for Back Bay students is application learning, and when you offer kids something like this, you get smiles like no other,” said College and Career Education Program Analyst Anne Younglove. 

Students also play a variety of roles to not only refine their communication skills, but also gain confidence. As students take control of the whole process, from sales generation to design to production, they act as general manager, office manager, production manager, sales representative and creative directors of the business. Everything they do gets added to a digital “employment readiness” portfolio that includes the student’s biography, certifications, highlighted projects and videos of them demonstrating expertise in the equipment. Students can use this portfolio as an interactive resume when seeking employment.

“They’re learning how a business operates from every angle. We’re preparing kids to enter the workforce above entry level. They can bring their experience to a business or to college, and they will be seen as leaders,” Younglove said. 

As part of the partnership with Spyder Lab, one of their business mentors, Mike Garcia, is on campus five days a week to work with the students as an on-site expert. “This is truly a student-run enterprise. They are developing leadership, communication, critical thinking and teamwork skills every day,” Garcia said.

“It feels so good to have people supporting me. Spyder Lab has become like a family to me,” said Back Bay senior Lindsey Sanchez. “After I graduate, I want to work for Spyder Lab and help other kids like me. I want to be someone who lifts people up,” she said.

Through their involvement in the Spyder Lab, students in the Back Bay High School Business Management Career Technical Education (CTE) pathway will graduate with the experience to succeed anywhere.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back Leaving Balboa Island.JPG 11.15

Click on photo for a larger image

Leaving Balboa Island and heading to Balboa Peninsula, 1963

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Orangewood Foundation raises $469K for teens and young adults in need at annual luncheon

Orangewood Foundation, a local nonprofit that serves nearly 2,000 foster and community youth annually, hosted its 25th Annual Ambassador Luncheon on Friday, Oct. 28 at the Renaissance Hotel in Newport Beach. The event recognizes Orangewood’s individual and collective accomplishments from the past year while honoring the foundation’s “Ambassadors” – volunteers and donors who support the Foundation’s efforts. This year, the event raised a total of $469,277 which will help the organization support community youth in Orange County.

“It is all in thanks to our generous donors and sponsors that we are able to provide such a high level of support to foster and community youth in Orange County,” said Orangewood Foundation CEO, Chris Simonsen. “This support changes the lives of hundreds of youth in our communities, by giving them resources, opportunities and connections that pave the way for a successful future.”

Orangewood Foundation Simonsen

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Photos by Lisa Stude, Werkit Photo

CEO Chris Simonsen & Honoree Lisa Evans

This year, guests were able to experience an interactive new event format as the luncheon featured an Innovation Station Tour, comprised of nine stations designed and built by Samueli Academy students. Each station showcased a different innovative program created by Orangewood Foundation, providing information and background on the Guardian Scholars Program, Orangewood Children’s Home, Rising Tide Program, Advanced Studies Fund, Samueli Academy, The Lighthouse Project, Young Adult Court, General William Lyon Workforce Academy and the Orangewood Grove highlighting the future of Orangewood.

The luncheon honored 25-year Orangewood staff member and Resource Center Supervisor, Lisa Evans, with the General William Lyon Crystal Vision Award, which recognizes worthy individuals who have given generously of their time and resources and who reflect the unending commitment to Orange County youth that was demonstrated by Founding Board Chairman, General William Lyon. 

Orangewood Foundation Campos

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Jessica Campos explaining an Innovation Station

Longtime Orangewood supporter and steadfast kitchen volunteer Kelly Bozza, was also honored, receiving the William G. Steiner Heart of Service Award which recognizes individuals who have an unwavering passion for helping young people, and that go above and beyond in supporting the organization.

The luncheon was made possible by several sponsors, including Holly and David Wilson, Angels Baseball Foundation, Anaheim Ducks Foundation, Farmers & Merchants Bank, Sandi and Doug Jackson, William Lyon, Jeff Roos, Bill and Pat Podlich, Christine and Robert Bartholomew, Samueli Foundation, the Ueberroth Family Foundation, Union Bank, The Livingston Family Foundation, Korbel Champagne, CommerceWest Bank, Titan Health & Security Technologies, Optima Tax Relief, Returning Home Foundation, CSU Fullerton, Barry & Toni McManus, Kirksey & Co., Chase Bank, Disneyland Resort, Cal Pac Sheet Metal and Motive Companies.

To learn how you can become an Orangewood Ambassador, visit www.orangewoodfoundation.org/ways-to-give/, or contact Kendra Puryear, chief development officer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

1, 2, 3…1001, 1002…10,001, 10,002…Why is it taking so long to count the ballots? There has to be a better way!

TJ headshot AugDo you remember when Election Day used to come, we’d vote, the polls would close, and that evening we’d sit in front of the TV and watch the results come in and, as the late hours came in, the winners were projected, for the most part?

What in the heck happened? Here we are a week later and ballots are still somewhere, seemingly, in the ether. We’re pretty sure who won most local races, but we really can’t get a count on what’s left out there affecting Newport Beach.

On the opening page of OC Votes (OC Registrar of Voters website), under unofficial election results, it lists “100% of precincts reporting,” with “2,169 precincts fully reporting” throughout OC, with “0 partially reporting.” 

That seems to make it pretty final.

But click to another OC Votes page, this one titled “What’s Left to Process,” and we find that there are still 176,541 ballots left to process.

That means more than 17% of the ballots remain uncounted.

It would seem like technology advancements would improve processes, but again, here we are a week later wondering how the Senate and Congress will finally end up; whether Katie Porter or Scott Baugh heads to Washington, D.C., (Porter currently leads by less than 3,000 votes out of 226,000 counted) and will Katrina Foley’s almost 3,429 vote lead hold up over Pat Bates in the OC Supervisor’s 5th District, after 195,000 have been processed. 

Finally, Lauren Kleiman’s lead grew even more last evening moving her to almost 55% of the vote, solidifying her for the City Council’s 6th District. 

That’s assuming most of the Newport Beach ballots are counted…but who, in fact, really knows?

Here are the latest results as of 5 p.m. Monday (November 14), with updates expected each evening at 5 p.m. until all votes are counted:

Newport Beach City Council

District 1

Joe Stapleton – 19,247, 63.86%

Tom Miller – 10,893, 36.14%

District 3

Erik Weigand – 16,952, 57.36%

Jim Mosher – 7,839, 26.52%

Amy Peters – 4,763, 16.12%

District 4

Robyn Grant – 24,201, 100.00%

District 6

Lauren Kleiman – 16,169, 54.73%

Joy Brenner – 13,374, 45.27%

Newport-Mesa Unified School District

Area 4

Lisa Pearson – 5,773, 56.44%

Barbara George – 3,537, 34.58%

Kristen Valle – 919, 8.98%

Area 5

Michelle Barto – 5,736, 65.22%

Reina Shebesta – 3,059, 34.78%

California State Offices

Assembly District 72

Diane Dixon – 102,373, 56.94%

Judie Mancuso – 77,432, 43.06%

State Senate District 36

Janet Nguyen – 162,328, 58.68%

Kim Carr – 114,290, 41.32%

Orange County Board of Supervisors

Fifth District

Katrina Foley – 99,263, 50.88%

Pat Bates – 95,834, 49.12%

United States Representatives

Congressional District 47

Katie Porter – 114,392, 50.64%

Scott Baugh – 111,501, 49.36%

• • •

As you can see from above, Diane Dixon is probably busy processing interim Change of Address forms connecting her Newport Beach residence with her potentially new living space in Sacramento. Diane won convincingly in her quest for the 72nd Assembly seat and will represent us in the State Capitol beginning next year.

However, she still remains engaged here, not resting on her laurels. On Monday, Nov. 28 at 5:30 p.m., Diane will conduct her 36th and final Town Hall at Marina Park.

Doing things right, Diane has invited Councilmember-Elect Joe Stapleton, who will succeed her in District 1, to join the meetings, assuring a nice, smooth handoff before she heads north.

Now, some other good news. Diane has promised Stu News that readers can expect regular updates on activities happening in Sacramento that affect Newport Beach. This will be a first in all my years of publishing both the Daily Pilot and Stu of connecting Sacramento with home.

I’m excited! 

• • •

Newport Harbor High School’s Boys Water Polo team won their second straight CIF Southern Section Open Division title, beating JSerra Catholic of San Juan Capistrano, 10-9, on Saturday, Nov. 12.

Sailor senior Ben Liechty led the team with three goals. 

Coming into the contest, JSerra was top ranked, with Newport Harbor #2. The two squads had split two earlier matches this year.

NHHS next plays this evening (5 p.m.) in the CIF State Southern California Regional Division 1 playoffs against Foothill.

The win was Newport Harbor’s 14th overall CIF boys water polo title.

• • •

NHHS football has their biggest challenge of the year this week as they attempt to continue to move through the CIF-SS Division 4 Playoffs. The Tars will host undefeated Cypress, 12-0, in the semi-finals.

Kickoff is 7 p.m. The winner will meet the victor of a Downey-Cathedral matchup in the finals on Friday, Nov. 25.

Harbor rolled last week beating Newbury Park, 49-28.

• • •

The Hoag Classic, the annual PGA TOUR Champions event, will be played March 15-19, 2023 at the Newport Beach Country Club. The event will once again feature Hoag Health System as the title sponsor and beneficiary of Orange County’s only PGA TOUR event. Konica Minolta and City National Bank will both return as Presenting Partners for the fourth year.

Expected to play will be defending champion and World Golf Hall of Fame member Retief Goosen, Darren Clarke, Fred Couples, David Duval, John Daly, Ernie Els, Jim Furyk, Padraig Harrington, Miguel Angel Jimenez, Bernhard Langer, Colin Montgomerie, Vijay Singh, Steve Stricker and Mike Weir

The 2023 event, with a $2 million purse, will also feature many of the same fan favorite tournament programs including Military Appreciation Day, presented by CoreLogic on Saturday, March 18 and Student Day, presented by Kingston Technology on Sunday, March 19, as well as fan attractions around the golf course and the Legends Pro-Am on Wednesday, March 15 and Thursday, March 16.

Volunteer Registration for the 2023 event is now open. For more information on volunteering, visit www.HoagClassic.com, or call the Volunteer Information line at 949.764.7406. 

General admission, Good-Any-One-Day (GAOD) digital vouchers will go on sale beginning Monday, Dec. 5 exclusively at www.HoagClassic.com. Each voucher costs $30 and provides access to the tournament grounds for any one day of tournament week.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members: 

Please join me in thanking and congratulating Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis, who announced his retirement last week, effective December 31.

While we will miss his leadership tremendously, Chief Lewis leaves behind an exceptional department that will ensure the continuation of excellent public safety service to our community. I’ve appointed Deputy Chief Joe Cartwright, who has held a variety of field and command-level positions in 20 years with the Newport Beach Police Department, to serve as acting chief.

Chief Lewis is well known in our community as a longtime veteran of the NBPD who rose through the ranks to become chief of police in 2016. He has been a respected and trusted leader who implemented innovative crime-reduction programs, such as data-driven community policing and excellence in emergency response and 911 call answer times. Under his leadership, the department developed innovative wellness initiatives in collaboration with national experts, resulting in higher morale, productivity and police service improvements.

Our search for his successor will begin in the new year. In the meantime, our community will have a few weeks to thank Chief Lewis for his many years of service and wish him the very best in retirement.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

Alternate Routes Recommended Next Week to Avoid Jamboree Road Construction

Expect traffic delays on northbound Jamboree Road this week as construction crews on a repaving project switch from nighttime to daytime work. 

Between 7 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 14 through Thursday, Nov. 17, paving work will take place in the northbound lanes of Jamboree between Sea Vista and Ford Road. Northbound traffic will be reduced to one lane. 

Motorists are advised to use alternate routes to avoid delays as heavy traffic is expected, especially during school drop-off and pick-up hours. In addition, bridge deck maintenance will be taking place on the Jamboree Road Bridge, which crosses over Upper Newport Bay.

The switch from nighttime to daytime construction is due to weather impacts, including low nighttime temperatures that preclude paving at night. 

For about three weeks after completion of the paving operation, crews will be adjusting all utilities to grade and installing new traffic signal detectors at all intersections. This work will require intermittent closures for northbound and southbound lanes. A minimum of one lane will remain open at all times. Alternate routes such as MacArthur Boulevard are advised.

The overall project, which includes paving and adding reclaimed water service to the median landscaping, is expected to be completed by mid-December.

Storm Brings Positive Start to Rainy Season

We were fortunate to receive some much-needed rain last week. The Orange County Water District Field Headquarters in Anaheim recorded a total of 2.28 inches of rainfall from last week’s storms. This brings the season total (since the beginning of July) to 2.96 inches, above the seasonal average of 2.09 inches.

While this is a positive start for the rainy season, there is still a pressing need to conserve water and address the state’s long-term drought conditions. An easy way to save water is to turn off sprinklers before, during and after rain events. For more water-saving tips and rebates, visit www.watersmartnewport.org.

City Hall Permit Center Launches Self Check-in

Applicants visiting the Permit Center can now choose a self check-in option with their mobile device or from our new stationary kiosk.

Customers will be notified via text message as they are checked in, called for service at the counter, or transferred to a different department staff member. A final text message will notify that service has been completed, including a link to our customer satisfaction survey

Our goal is to provide a better overall experience when doing business at the Permit Center.

The system also tracks applicants’ wait times, which will help the City better serve visitors and continue to improve the Permit Center experience.

Winter Class Registration Opens November 17

Get ready to slide into winter with registration for classes and camps opening on Thursday, Nov. 17 at 8 a.m. Community members are encouraged to give the gift of recreation this holiday season to help their friends and family start the new year learning skills, making friends, staying active and having fun.

Residents will receive a copy of the printed edition of the Newport Navigator in the mail and can view the fully linked digital version online at www.newportbeachca.gov/recreation.

Citywide Bridge Maintenance Begins November 14

Beginning this week, a city contractor will be cleaning and sealing the decks of several city bridges: Newport Island Bridge (at 38th Street); Jamboree Road Bridge; Bison Avenue Bridge and Bonita Canyon Bridge.

Work will be performed between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. beginning on Monday, Nov. 14 through late November. During construction hours, traffic control and lane restrictions will be in place.

In addition, the contractor will be doing repair work on the Balboa Island bridge on Monday, Nov. 28 between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Tickets Now Available for November 16 OASIS Thanksgiving Luncheon

The OASIS Senior Center will be holding its annual Thanksgiving Luncheon at 12 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 16. A traditional Thanksgiving lunch will be catered by 24 Carrots and coffee, drinks and dessert will be included. Come and enjoy holiday-themed music, a raffle drawing and the opportunity to give thanks.

Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased in the OASIS Administration office or by calling 949.644.3244.

Abandoned Small Vessels to be Auctioned November 18 at Marina Park

The city will auction abandoned small vessels to the public on Friday, Nov. 18 at 9:30 a.m. at the Marina Park Sailing Center, 1600 W. Balboa Blvd. The auction will include small dinghy vessels, stand-up paddle boards and kayaks. 

Viewing will open at 9 a.m. and the auction will begin at 9:30 a.m. Vessels are sold as is, for cash only, and the minimum bid varies with each vessel.

Payment (cash only) is due immediately after the auction. The winning bidders are responsible for removing their vessels by 5 p.m. Nov. 18. 

Registration Opens November 17 for December 2 “Breakfast With Santa” Event

Santa is coming! Join us for “Breakfast with Santa” from 9:30-11 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 2 at the Newport Coast Community Center. 

Enjoy breakfast burritos and your favorite holiday songs while waiting for Santa’s big arrival. There will be crafts, bounce houses, train rides, and of course photos with Santa!

Registration opens on November 17 at 8 a.m. Register here.

Marina Park Family Fun Night December 16

Experience a fun family event for all ages with dinner and amazing views of the 111th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade. Activities will include crafts, games and photos with Santa. Tickets are limited, registration begins Thursday, Nov. 17. Register here.

New State Building Codes to Take Effect in 2023

The City of Newport Beach will be adopting the 2022 California Building Standards Codes this year. The 2022 California codes will become effective on January 1, 2023.

The last business day for projects complying with 2019 California codes to submit plans to the city is Friday, Dec. 23. The Permit Counter will be closed for the holidays, beginning Monday, Dec. 26 through Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2023.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team:

–Responded to a domestic violence incident and transported a woman and her child to a safe location.

–Transported one person to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for an intake appointment.

–Transported two people to crisis stabilization units for treatment.

–Transported four people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

–Engaged with the community at the Newport Beach Police Department’s Mobile Café at Fashion Island.

Homeless Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Continued to shelter people. Twenty people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter. 

–Enrolled an older adult and her daughter into services and obtained emergency CalFresh benefits for them.

–Delivered a new photo ID to a person sheltered at the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter and transported him to Share Our Selves for services.

–Transported a man to an appointment at the Veteran’s Administration.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

On the Agenda: City Council Meeting for November 15

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 15. Items of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda and reports can be viewed here

The regular meeting will begin at 4 p.m. Agenda items include:

–Approval of a naming rights donation agreement for the Newport Beach Public Library Lecture Hall. The Newport Beach Public Library Foundation has received donation commitments from Elizabeth D. Stahr ($750,000) and Louise and Roy Woolsey ($1 million). If approved, the Library Lecture Hall courtyard will be named the “Elizabeth D. Stahr Courtyard” and the building lobby will be named the “Louise and Roy Woolsey Memorial Lobby.” 

–Confirmation of appointments to the General Plan Advisory Committee. The General Plan Update Steering Committee has recommended 30 residents for the General Plan Advisory Committee, which will help ensure sufficient stakeholder input, review and provide guidance to city staff and consultants and make recommendations to the Steering Committee.

–Budget reports. The city’s Finance Department has prepared reports with information on revenues, expenditures, and estimated fund balance for the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2021-22 and the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2022-23. 

–A public hearing and consideration of the 2022 California building standards codes with local amendments and the 2022 California fire code with local amendments. The City enforces California’s building standards and fire codes that regulate design and construction of structures to protect life and property. Every three years, the state adopts new codes and local agencies must adopt the same codes and make amendments with specific findings.

–A review of traffic-calming measures in the Mariners neighborhood. In July 2021, the city installed speed cushions on various streets in the Dover Shores and Mariners neighborhoods to help slow traffic speeds. Staff will discuss the impact of the speed cushions on traffic and concerns raised by some Mariners-area residents. 

–Authorizing a $30.5-million agreement to purchase property at 1201 Dove St. for use as a future police headquarters. The Newport Beach Police Department’s current station, at 870 Santa Barbara Drive, is about 10 years from the end of its useful life and police operations have outgrown the existing facility. Under the proposal, the city would purchase and manage the Dove Street property for about 10 years before constructing a new police station headquarters. During that time, the city would continue to lease office space, generating revenue to help offset the purchase price. The cost would be paid through General Fund surplus and unallocated capital project reserve funds. 

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, Nov. 15

City Council Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 4 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 16

Homeless Services Community Forum Series:

Share Our Selves

Civic Center Community Room

100 Civic Center Drive – 6-7 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 17

Winter 2022-23 Class Registration Opening

8 a.m.

Library Live 2022-2023: Bill Plaschke

Friends Meeting Room

1000 Avocado Ave. – 7-8:45 p.m.

Friday, Nov. 18

Small Vessel Auction

Marina Park Sailing Center

1600 W. Balboa Blvd. – 9:30-11 a.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, Nov. 11 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Registration starts this Thursday for City of Newport Beach Rec winter programs

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept. is gearing up for its winter programs with registration beginning this Thursday, Nov. 17.

Get a glimpse of the winter classes now that the winter Navigator is live (and due to arrive in mailboxes this week!), because there are classes for all ages. Learn to play a new instrument, pick up a new sport, or learn to dance...the possibilities are endless.

registration starts winter camps snow

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept.

But, before you slide into winter, check out some of their fall offerings. Spots are still available in the OC Tiny Tots Academy Preschool. Your tiny tot will engage in small group instruction art, science, multi-sensory learning, music, movement and imaginative play.

To view the winter Navigator digital version and sign up for the programs, click here.


Hope is here to end lung cancer

Lung cancer is the most common the type of cancer worldwide – and a growing number of cases are being found in people who never smoked, which means factors like the environment or genetics may be involved.

City of Hope, a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, is nationally recognized for its lung cancer research and care. Its discoveries and new treatments are giving people with lung cancer the chance to live longer, better and more fully.

“Today, people with lung cancer have more reason for hope than ever before,” said Jyoti Malhotra, M.D., M.P.H., a medical oncologist specializing in lung cancer and the director of thoracic medical oncology at City of Hope Orange County.

Hope is here Malhotra group

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Photos courtesy of City of Hope

Jyoti Malhotra, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Thoracic Medical Oncology, City of Hope Orange County (front row, far right) and the lung cancer team at City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center

Acclaimed Cancer Expertise, Lifesaving Clinical Trials

Dr. Malhotra is part of a team advancing world-renowned cancer research and treatment at City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center, the most advanced comprehensive cancer center in Orange County. 

Dr. Malhotra has designed and led multiple clinical trials that bring together precision medicine, which targets treatment to each tumor’s molecular and genetic characteristics, with immunotherapy, which harnesses the body’s natural defenses to fight cancer.

“Breakthroughs in research and treatment happening right here at City of Hope Orange County are changing what it means to have lung cancer,” she said. 

If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with lung cancer, be sure to get treatment from a physician who specializes in the disease and offers access to leading-edge therapies.

The City of Hope Difference: Lung Cancer Care

City of Hope Orange County’s renowned cancer-fighting physician-scientists can deliver outstanding outcomes that are difficult to achieve elsewhere. Our advanced treatments for lung cancer include:

–Minimally invasive techniques such as laparoscopic surgery that make recovery faster and improve outcomes.

–Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, using advanced computer and video technology to perform minimally invasive biopsies and surgeries.

Interventional pulmonology program – the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic interventions available, including rigid bronchoscopy, medical pleuroscopy and robot-assisted bronchoscopy.

–Genetic tests to determine specific tumor biology and tailor your treatments to stop it from growing.

–Ultraprecise radiation therapy techniques.

City of Hope is Orange County’s Most Advanced Cancer Care

Patients at City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center receive fully integrated, multidisciplinary care – from prevention through survivorship – in one convenient location. They have access to City of Hope’s 575 physicians and more than 1,000 researchers and scientists who only focus on cancer and nearly 1,000 Phase 1-3 clinical trials conducted at City of Hope each year. Cancer research that has led to breakthrough treatments used around the globe is conducted right here. Patients who once traveled for expert care now have the world’s best cancer-fighting minds close to home.

Hope is here white ribbons

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City of Hope Orange County physicians (L-R) Percy Lee, M.D. and Jyoti Malhotra, M.D. M.P.H., with grateful patient Diane Miller and L.A. Rams mascot painting white ribbons for lung cancer survivors at a recent event at City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center

City of Hope Orange County lung cancer patients, physicians and staff recently came together at City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center to paint white ribbons that will be distributed to lung cancer survivors across Southern California. The event, a partnership with The White Ribbon Project, aimed to change the perception of lung cancer and let people affected by the disease know they are not alone.

This is the Hope you’ve been waiting for. For more information, visit www.cityofhope.org/OC.

This is paid content by City of Hope Orange County. To make an appointment at any of our five Orange County locations, call 888.333.HOPE (4673).

City of Hope Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center

–City of Hope Newport Beach Fashion Island

–City of Hope Newport Beach Lido

–City of Hope Irvine Sand Canyon

City of Hope Huntington Beach


Get out and explore Buck Gully this autumn

Taking a hike in the Buck Gully Reserve, which connects Corona del Mar and Newport Coast, is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the upcoming warmer weather. Explore this 300-acre natural habitat on foot, with three hikes led by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff.

Get out Buck Gully waterfall

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Emily Spain

The stream is running, making for a memorable late afternoon/early evening hike

–Buck Gully Upper Loop Evening Hikes: Explore the richness of Buck Gully Reserve as you hike during the beautiful early evening hours on Tuesday, Nov. 15 and Saturday, Dec. 20 from 3-5:30 p.m. The stream is running, and the rich plant and animal life are enjoying the cool, shady canyon making for an evening hike in a natural oasis amid the suburban surroundings. Walk along San Joaquin Hills Road, which overlooks Buck Gully for the first mile, then drop down into the canyon on the Bobcat Trail, looping back through the upper end of the gully along the Buck Gully Trail. This activity is conducted at a walking pace, approximately 3 miles per hour. The distance is 4 miles; duration, 2.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is open to those 8 years and older. This hike is free, but registration is required. Staging area is the Newport Coast Community Center at 6401 San Joaquin Hills Road. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully views

Click on photo for a larger image

Enjoy panoramic views as you take in the canyon’s natural beauty

–Bridges of Buck Gully Hikes: Buck Gully is a natural, coastal canyon which opened up to the public in 2012 with the installation of four bridges to allow for safe public access. Discover the bridges on Tuesday, Dec. 6 and These bridges facilitate exploration of the Buck Gully Reserve, and also provide unique vantages and viewing platforms from which to pause and observe the abundant life in and around the stream. The guided program starts with a short walk from the OASIS Senior Center to the beginning of the Buck Gully trail, offering a visually dramatic entrance into this special canyon. Open to those 12 years and older. Conducted at a walking pace at approximately 3 miles per hour. Distance is 5 miles; duration is 3.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully bridge

Click on photo for a larger image

Several bridges provide unique vantages and viewing platforms

–Buck Gully Loop Hikes: Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Tuesday, Dec. 13 and from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning from the OASIS Senior Center, you’ll hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where you will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail. This hike is 6 miles; duration, 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty and conducted at a walking pace, approximately three miles per hour. It is geared to those 12+ years of age. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar Register at www.letsgooutside.org.


City hires Tustin’s Jason Al-Imam to fill finance director/treasurer role

Jason Al-Imam, a municipal finance executive with nearly 20 years of experience in local government, has been named as the finance director/treasurer for the City of Newport Beach, City Manager Grace Leung announced yesterday (Nov. 14). 

Al-Imam has served in financial management positions for four full-service cities in Southern California: Fountain Valley, Los Alamitos, Riverside and Tustin, where he is currently the finance director/treasurer.

He will begin his new position on November 28. He succeeds Scott Catlett, who left the city in September for a position in the private sector. 

City hires Tustin's Jason Al Imam

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Jason Al-Imam

“Jason brings the combination of leadership skills, city government experience and financial savvy we were looking for in a new finance director,” Leung said. “His extensive background with city budgets, and a successful track record of building relationships with internal and external stakeholders, makes him a great fit for this position.”

As the city’s finance director, Al-Imam will oversee Newport Beach’s $404 million budget, ensure compliance with finance and investment policies, manage a staff of 33 full-time employees and work closely with the City Council and Finance Committee. The finance director is also responsible for managing the city’s debts and investment portfolio, accounting and financial reporting, forecasting, purchasing, payroll and billing.

Al-Imam, a resident of Irvine, is a member of the California Society of Municipal Finance Officers and a graduate of Vanguard University of Southern California.


CdM Chamber holiday networking celebration tonight at The Bungalow

Tonight (November 15), join in on the festive holiday networking celebration the Corona del Chamber is hosting at The Bungalow. Enjoy live music and refreshments while socializing with community business friends and neighbors on The Bungalow’s charming outdoor fireside patio.

The gathering, which takes place from 5:30-7:30 p.m., is open to the public. The chamber suggests RSVPs to secure a spot at this always popular event.

It’s free to chamber members and $25 for guests. This includes a complimentary glass of wine, complimentary heavy appetizers and live music.

Go here to RSVP.

The Bungalow is located at 2441 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Two top physicians join Hoag

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian has recruited top cancer researcher Carlos Becerra, M.D., to become the Hoag Family Cancer Institute’s Medical Director of Cancer Research. He will provide strategic leadership in advancing the institute’s clinical research program and helm the hospital’s growing number of cancer clinical trials.

Dr. Becerra served for 16 years as the Director of the Innovative Clinical Trials Center at Baylor University Medical Center and four years as the Cancer Committee Chair at the Sammons Cancer Center in Dallas. His accomplishments in the field of cancer research have earned him respect from his colleagues and patients alike.

Top two physicians Becerra

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Photos courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Carlos Becerra, M.D.

“Dr. Becerra comes to Hoag with a wealth of knowledge and experience in bringing clinical trial innovations to patients,” said Robert T. Braithwaite, president and CEO of Hoag. “He shares in Hoag’s mission to be at the forefront of discovering new and better treatment options and deliver the best possible care that can’t be found at other hospitals in our area. We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Becerra to Hoag.” 

Hoag currently provides patients with access to more than 100 clinical trials in cancer alone. These trials, funded in part by philanthropy, evaluate leading-edge options to treat some of the most prevalent cancers, including breast, lung, gynecologic, prostate and gastrointestinal cancers. 

Dr. Becerra said Hoag has long enjoyed a reputation for providing patients with access to research without having to travel far from home, and he is excited to join a team that is dedicated to making a significant impact on cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

“Hoag is in one of the most unique positions in the country in that it offers patients access to top-tier clinical trials and research,” Dr. Becerra said. “The commitment to bringing together some of the brightest physician scientists to lead groundbreaking research is what attracted me to join this talented team.”   

Hoag also welcomes board-certified gastroenterologist Catherine Ngo, M.D., to head the Hoag Digestive Health Institute’s Motility Program.

Dr. Ngo has built a reputation over the last decade as a compassionate, approachable and thorough physician with a strong background in motility.

Top two physicians Ngo

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Catherine Ngo, M.D.

Gastrointestinal motility refers to the coordinated action of nerves and muscles that allow for proper digestion and passage of food through the digestive tract. Motility disorders can affect any part of the GI tract, resulting in various symptoms that can commonly affect a patient’s quality of life such as difficulty swallowing, nausea, bloating, fullness, or constipation.

Leveraging Dr. Ngo’s expertise, Hoag’s Motility Program will offer advanced diagnostic and treatment innovations to more accurately identify the cause of a patient’s symptoms in order to direct personalized therapeutic interventions. Patients will also have access to clinical trials and cutting-edge motility medical therapies.

“When people face motility issues, they are uncomfortable, both physically and emotionally. Many are embarrassed or even scared to face colonoscopies and other diagnostic procedures. Dr. Ngo’s kindness and patience, coupled with her profound medical expertise, put patients at ease,” said Braithwaite. “That combination of compassion and excellence makes Dr. Ngo a perfect fit for Hoag.”

The Hoag Motility Program is designed to complement the comprehensive care within the Hoag Digestive Health Institute, treating all gastrointestinal disorders from the esophagus to the colon. 

Dr. Ngo said Hoag’s reputation among physicians as a multidisciplinary, collaborative hospital drew her to head the hospital’s new program.

“Hoag takes a team-based approach to everything it does, which, in the case of digestive disorders, is crucial,” Dr. Ngo said. “Hoag puts patients first and is driving innovative care. I am so excited to work closely with other specialists to help our patients achieve their highest quality of life.”

Dr. Ngo will be seeing patients at Hoag Health Center Aliso Viejo, located at 26671 Aliso Creek Road, Suite 301, Aliso Viejo. To schedule an appointment, call 949.764.7560. For more information, visit www.hoag.org/digestive

For more information on Hoag Hospital, visit www.hoag.org.


Council agenda includes property purchase for future police station replacement, updated fire code, Mariners traffic calming measures

By SARA HALL

City Council has several interesting items on a packed agenda tonight. 

At tonight’s meeting (Tuesday, Nov. 15), council will consider: The purchase of a property for a future police station replacement; updated fire code amendments; Mariners neighborhood traffic calming measures and an ordinance related to nonconforming code and Local Coastal Program amendments.

The last item on the agenda is the council’s consideration of the purchase of the property at 1201 Dove St. for $30.5 million for a future police station replacement facility. 

The Newport Beach Police Department is currently headquartered on the city-owned property at 870 Santa Barbara Drive. The building is within 10 years of the end of its useful life, and, according to the staff report, NBPD operations have outgrown the existing facility. 

The Dove Street property is located in the airport area on a 3.59-acre site currently developed with an 82,868-square-foot, six-story office building. The building was constructed in 1973 and underwent a major renovation in 1989, with various system upgrades and maintenance and tenant improvements completed since then. The property was acquired by AG Dove Owner, L.P. an institutional investor, in 2018. The building is currently 84% leased to 21 tenants for finance, healthcare, real estate, legal and other services and uses. 

NBPD and other city staff toured the property in March and determined the general location, size and configuration to be sufficient and appropriate for development of a new police station. Access to the property is located on Dove Street, and staff will work with the adjacent property owners to determine if a secondary point of access to Quail Street can be obtained.

Council agenda includes property purchase current police station

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Courtesy of NBPD

The current Newport Beach Police Department headquarters 

The police facility replacement is already planned for in the Capital Improvement Program. 

“The city’s long-range strategic plan is to purchase property and manage it for the next 10 years or until the city is in a position to develop a new police station headquarters,” staff explain in the report. “Acquiring property now to develop a new police station will allow the city to capitalize on current real estate prices, avoid competing with residential developers seeking housing opportunity sites and recoup a portion of the purchase price with the property’s existing net income stream.”

Tonight, council will consider an agreement for purchase and sale of real property and escrow instructions for the purchase of property located at 1201 Dove St. for a price of $30.5 million, utilizing FY 2021-22 year-end general fund surplus and unallocated capital project reserve funds. 

“Given the limited number of parcels of a suitable size for a new police station and the upward trend of commercial real estate values in Newport Beach, staff proposes for the city to purchase the property and to continue leasing the office spaces. The net income generated from the property will help offset the purchase price,” the staff report reads.

The current site of police headquarters on Santa Barbara was acquired by the city in 1973 from The Irvine Company. The facility was constructed according to the building code standards of that time. Since then, the seismic structural design requirements have changed for facilities considered “essential” (police, fire, hospitals) and are now designed to a much higher seismic standard than non-essential buildings. NBPD shares the four-acre parcel with fire station no. 3.

“While it is possible to structurally upgrade the existing police station, it is more cost effective to replace the building due to the future facility space and utilization needs,” the staff report reads. “A new police station facility will be structurally designed to the highest seismic standard required by the building codes.”

While the facility and property have been maintained and remodeled over the last 50 years, NBPD operations have expanded and effectively outgrown the site, according to staff. 

“The city has a need to replace the existing police station with a larger more modern facility that will meet the future needs of the police department,” the report reads.

A utilization survey of the spaces within the existing police station and conducted a needs assessment to determine the needs of a future police station. The study determined a future police facility will require a minimum of 73,000 square feet (current space sits at 49,284 square feet of gross floor area). The differences between the existing facility and the future needs of the police department include adequate space for the patrol division, and an appropriately laid-out firearms training and shooting range.

Staff considered replacing the existing NBPD station at its current location, but determined the replacement cost would outweigh the costs to relocate the facility to a new location. Costs for redevelopment on-site would include temporarily relocating police operations during construction, including jail services and the helicopter landing pad. 

During regular business, council will review the Mariners neighborhood traffic calming measures.

On Jan. 12, 2021, the City Council directed staff to implement neighborhood traffic calming measures including installing speed cushions on various streets throughout the Dover Shores and Mariners neighborhoods. This direction followed the preparation of an extensive traffic calming study, three neighborhood meetings to discuss the issue, and submission of a petition from the residents showing 60% support within the entire neighborhood for the project. The speed cushions were installed in July 2021. 

As a follow-up to this neighborhood traffic calming project, staff completed post installation speed surveys. The results of the follow-up speed measurements showed a reduction of speeds of 3 mph to 9 mph on the streets within the neighborhood. 

Recently staff received some concerns from residents adjacent to 1911 Highland Drive in the Mariners neighborhood about the speed cushion that was installed near their homes. The concerns from the residents are related to noise. Staff met with the residents at the speed cushion location on November 2 to discuss their concerns. At the meeting, the residents requested the speed cushion be relocated or removed entirely. Although staff noted that there are challenges related to relocating the speed cushion and potential negative impacts with removal of the speed cushion.

Council agenda includes property purchase fire

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Courtesy of NBPD

Firefighters respond to a house fire in Big Canyon in April

Council will also hold a public hearing and consider adoption of the 2022 California building standards codes and the 2022 California fire code, both with local amendments.

The city enforces state model building standards and fire codes for the purpose of regulating design and construction of all structures to protect life and property. Every three years, the state adopts new codes. Local agencies must adopt the same codes and make amendments with specific findings 30 days prior to the Jan. 1, 2023, effective date of the new codes.

Some of the key amendments proposed for incorporation into the NBMC:

–NBMC Section 15.02.085 would require the permittee to use a city franchised solid waste enterprise for handling removal and disposal of all construction and demolition waste for a demolition permit, for complete demolition of a structure. This provision was inadvertently omitted with the adoption of Ordinance No. 2010-23.

–NBMC Section 15.04.090 would exempt the fire sprinklers requirement for accessory dwelling units when the existing primary residence is not equipped with fire sprinklers. The construction of an accessory dwelling unit shall not trigger the requirement for fire sprinklers to be installed in the existing building.

–NBMC Section 15.19.060 would incorporate the timeline requirements for acceptance and approval of permit applications for the installation of electric vehicle charging stations. These timeline requirements are compliant with AB 970 (Chapter 710, Statutes 2021) which becomes operative on January 1, 2023, for cities with a population of less than 200,000 residents.

–NBMC Section 15.50 would be revised to clarify the definition of Design Flood Elevation and to incorporate the requirement for one foot of freeboard above the Base Flood Elevation for minimum height of the lowest floor for new and substantially improved/damaged buildings in Special Flood Hazard Areas. The one-foot freeboard requirement is intended to be consistent with the changes in minimum requirements for the Community Rating System (CRS) implemented by the “Addendum to the 2017 CRS Coordinator’s Manual,” which was issued by FEMA and went into effect on January 1, 2021.

–NBMC Section 9.04.380 would require the property owners of existing structures to be improved with the installation of 1/8” mesh screening to protect ventilation openings from ember intrusion in the event of a wildfire. This amendment is consistent with the Cal Fire Low Cost Retrofit document request for homeowners to improve their homes and other structures from flying hot embers during a wind driven wildfire.

–NBMC Section 9.04.385 would require property owners to trim existing trees from hanging over or touching structures to reduce burning vegetation from igniting structures. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety, in cooperation with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends no trees within five (5) feet of structures to reduce the spread of burning vegetation to the structures.

–NBMC 9.04.386 would require property owners to create and maintain a one-foot wide noncombustible zone at the base of new and existing structures to prevent falling embers from igniting structures in the event of a wildfire. The California Department of Insurance’s recently published Safer from Wildfire program recommends a six-inch wide noncombustible zone at the base of structures to protect from embers during a wildfire. Newport Beach Fire Department recommends a one-foot zone for additional separation from existing mature residential landscaping within the established Very High Fire Severity Zone.

Council will hold a hearing to consider an ordinance related to nonconforming code and Local Coastal Program amendments

The amendments proposed are to Title 20 (Planning and Zoning) and Title 21 (Local Coastal Program Implementation Plan). The amendments include two parts: Clarifying development allowances for residential uses that are nonconforming due to density; and reinstating a side setback allowance for properties in certain residential zoning and coastal zoning districts. The side setback allowance would allow additions in line with the principal structure regardless of the current minimum side setback standards.

The council agenda is available online here. The regular meeting will begin at 4 p.m. (there is no study session this week).

The meeting can be watched live on the local NBTV channel (Spectrum 3 or Cox 852) or on the city’s website here.

Members of the public may speak in person in council chambers (there is not a remote or online option to participate).

Questions and comments can be submitted in writing for City Council consideration by sending them to the city clerk at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To give the council adequate time to review comments, written comments were submitted by 5 p.m. on November 14 (the day before the City Council meeting). Correspondence received by this deadline were uploaded to the agenda packet by November 14 at 5:30 p.m. and can be viewed here

Material received after the deadline and prior to 2 p.m. today (November 15) will be provided to the council in hard copy and will be available to the public at the meeting.

 ~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Night of 1000 Lights coming to Sherman Library & Gardens

Sherman Library & Gardens is presenting Nights of 1000 Lights for 11 nights in December beginning Friday, Dec. 9, where you can stroll through the Gardens this holiday season and experience a dazzling display of lights and live entertainment. This year’s theme is “Hooray for Hollywood!” Tickets are on sale now.

Night of 1000 light tunnel

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Walk through the dazzling light tunnel

Enter Sherman Gardens on the red carpet and stroll through the glistening light tunnel, on your way to Moulin Rouge, a Parisian dance hall in the Tea Garden featuring can-can dancers and French cabaret singers. Take photos by a classic 1938 Packard 120 Convertible Sedan, compliments of Packards International Motor Car Club. Experience the historic Hollywood Hills recreated with images from the Sherman Library archives. Venture through the Sherman Shop of Horrors and encounter Trouble in Paradise in the Tropical Conservatory.

A must see is a visit to Santa in his Miracle on PCH workshop. Then head to the fire pit to whip up your own batch of s’mores. The Garden Shop will be open and filled with unique holiday gifts.

Don’t forget to make a wish at The Wishing Tree to create lasting memories with friends and family.

Nights of 1000 Lights takes place December 9-11 and 15-22 each night from 6-9 p.m.

This event will sell out. For more information and tickets, visit www.thesherman.org, or call 949.673.2261.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Get out and explore Buck Gully this autumn

Taking a hike in the Buck Gully Reserve, which connects Corona del Mar and Newport Coast, is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the upcoming warmer weather. Explore this 300-acre natural habitat on foot, with three hikes led by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff.

Get out Buck Gully views

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Emily Spain

Enjoy panoramic views as you take in the canyon’s natural beauty

–Bridges of Buck Gully Hikes: Buck Gully is a natural, coastal canyon which opened up to the public in 2012 with the installation of four bridges to allow for safe public access. Discover the bridges on Tuesdays, Nov. 11 and Dec. 6 and These bridges facilitate exploration of the Buck Gully Reserve, and also provide unique vantages and viewing platforms from which to pause and observe the abundant life in and around the stream. The guided program starts with a short walk from the OASIS Senior Center to the beginning of the Buck Gully trail, offering a visually dramatic entrance into this special canyon. Open to those 12 years and older. Conducted at a walking pace at approximately 3 miles per hour. Distance is 5 miles; duration is 3.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully bridge

Click on photo for a larger image 

Several bridges provide unique vantages and viewing platforms

–Buck Gully Loop Hikes: Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Saturday, Nov. 12 and Tuesday, Dec. 13 and from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning from the OASIS Senior Center, you’ll hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where you will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail. This hike is 6 miles; duration, 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty and conducted at a walking pace, approximately three miles per hour. It is geared to those 12+ years of age. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully waterfall

Click on photo for a larger image

The stream is running, making for a memorable late afternoon/early evening hike

–Buck Gully Upper Loop Evening Hikes: Explore the richness of Buck Gully Reserve as you hike during the beautiful early evening hours on Tuesday, Nov. 15 and Saturday, Dec. 20 from 3-5:30 p.m. The stream is running, and the rich plant and animal life are enjoying the cool, shady canyon making for an evening hike in a natural oasis amid the suburban surroundings. Walk along San Joaquin Hills Road, which overlooks Buck Gully for the first mile, then drop down into the canyon on the Bobcat Trail, looping back through the upper end of the gully along the Buck Gully Trail. This activity is conducted at a walking pace, approximately 3 miles per hour. The distance is 4 miles; duration, 2.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is open to those 8 years and older. This hike is free, but registration is required. Staging area is the Newport Coast Community Center at 6401 San Joaquin Hills Road. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.


Newport Beach Public Library Foundation continues Library Live Author Series with Bill Plaschke

Newport Beach Public Library Foundation (NBPLF) continues their Library Live Author Series with Los Angeles columnist Bill Plaschke on Thursday, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)

Plaschke’s Paradise Found: A High School Team’s Rise From the Ashes follows the Paradise High School football team and their athletic staff, specifically their head coach Rick Prinz, through its first season after the 2018 Camp Fire leveled its Northern California town. He recounts the moving, tragic and hopeful account of the destruction of Paradise, Calif., by raging wildfires and its resurrection through the spirit, courage and heart of their high school football team.

Newport Beach Public Library Plaschke

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of NBPLF

Bill Plaschke 

Plaschke has been an L.A. Times columnist since 1996. He has been named national sports columnist of the year eight times by the Associated Press, and twice by the Society of Professional Journalists and National Headliner Awards. He is the author of five books, including a collection of his columns entitled, Plaschke: Good Sports, Spoil Sports, Foul Ball and Oddballs. Plaschke is also a panelist on the popular ESPN daily talk show, Around the Horn.

Newport Beach Public Library Paradise Found bookcover

Plaschke will be sharing his book, “Paradise Found: A High School Team’s Rise From the Ashes”

To purchase tickets for this event which are General, $35 and NBPLF members, $30, go here. The cost includes a lecture, book sale & signing and refreshments and there is limited seating. There is free parking on the ground level.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


City of Newport Beach Rec is gearing up for winter programs

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept. is gearing up for its Winter programs with registration beginning Thursday, Nov. 17.

Get a glimpse of the Winter classes once the Winter Navigator goes live. because there are classes for all ages. Learn to play a new instrument, pick up a new sport, or learn to dance...the possibilities are endless.

City of Newport Beach LEGO

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Dept.

But, before you slide into winter, check out some of their fall offerings. Spots are still available in the OC Tiny Tots Academy Preschool. Your tiny tot will engage in small group instruction art, science, multi-sensory learning, music, movement, and imaginative play.

To learn more, go here to check out the programs.


It’s the most wonderful time of the year at Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Nothing says the holidays like Segerstrom Center for the Arts and their incredible offering of performances, making it the most wonderful time of the year.

It doesn’t get any better than the Mannheim Steamroller Christmas; The Nutcracker; Silent Night Silent Disco; Holidays Around the World; The Broadway Hollywood Holiday Songbook; Alton Brown Live Beyond the Eats – the Holiday Variant; Johnny Mathis Christmas Concert; Fiesta Navidad and Salute to Vienna.

It’s a magical roster of international music, dance, legendary recording artists and family holiday cheer making for a most remarkable holiday season at Segerstrom Center for the Arts. 

Coming to Segerstrom Center Mannheim Steamroller

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of scfta.org

“Mannheim Steamroller Christmas” kicks off the holiday performances in Segerstrom Hall on December 4

Celebrate all month long, beginning on Sunday, Dec. 4 with every family’s Christmas classic, Mannheim Steamroller Christmas and then continuing with fun outdoor events including Silent Night Silent Disco (Friday, Dec. 9) and Holidays Around the World (Saturday, Dec. 10). Next, Sugar plums and fairies grace the stage with the return of American Ballet Theatre’s The Nutcracker (December 9-18), followed by seasonal concerts The Broadway Hollywood Holiday Songbook (December 15-17), Johnny Mathis Christmas Concert (December 23), Fiesta Navidad (December 23) and the season culminates with Salute to Vienna (January 1, 2023). 

Tickets are available for purchase online at www.scfta.org, or at the Box Office, located at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


CdM Chamber holiday networking celebration this Tuesday at The Bungalow

This Tuesday, Nov. 15, join in on the festive holiday networking celebration the Corona del Chamber is planning at The Bungalow. Enjoy live music and refreshments while socializing with community business friends and neighbors on The Bungalow’s charming outdoor fireside patio.

The gathering, which takes place from 5:30-7:30 p.m., is open to the public. The chamber suggests early RSVPs to secure a spot at this always popular event, especially before it fills up.

It’s free to chamber members and $25 for guests. This includes a complimentary glass of wine, complimentary heavy appetizers and live music.

Go here to RSVP.

The Bungalow is located at 2441 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Sure, travel is headed in the right direction, but there’s still a ways to go to meet pre-pandemic expectations

By GARY SHERWIN

Go outside and take a deep breath. Change is in the air and you can feel it.

And, no, I’m not talking about the recent elections.

The Halloween decorations at Roger’s Gardens are being tucked away and the center’s famous holiday shop is now open with its sparking ornaments. Down the road at Fashion Island, they’re pulling out their festive décor and preparing for the arrival of the city’s tallest Christmas tree. And down at the harbor, local boaters are trying to decide what lights to use for the 114th Annual Boat Parade.

It’s time to settle into the holiday season now that Fall has safely arrived, and the contentious political season is behind us.

Maybe you are thinking that with the new season and another busy travel period ahead, things might also be better with the airlines and that you can confidently hit the road to visit the relatives after a difficult few months. Travel this summer was an unqualified mess, but people kept flying anyway.

Gary Sherwin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

Well, the holiday season has always been about dreaming, and so it is with travel. Keep those positive thoughts about uncrowded and on time flights. Sorry to break it to you, but Christmas has always been built on fantasy.

However, while the fears of a recession have got the Federal Reserve and consumers on edge, when it comes to travel, things appear to be much the same and there is the good news.

People are definitely concerned about rising prices, especially with travel, but it doesn’t appear to be stopping them. According to TripAdvisor, about 60% of Americans still plan to travel this Fall, compared to 54% last year. And 66% of those travelers plan to spend more than they did last year.

Between long-delayed weddings, postponed conferences and visiting relatives people haven’t seen in a few years, travel is still red hot.

Here in town, the meetings and convention season is underway and hotels are reporting good business; the first somewhat normal Fall since the start of the pandemic.

Because demand is still strong, you might think that the airlines have cleaned up their act and are limiting the cancellations and trip delays.

Well, not so much. While things have improved over the summer, airline disfunction is still going to be a factor this Fall and that’s not good for anybody.

Cancellations…lost luggage…flight delays and endless waits for customer service. Even the official in charge of regulating civilian aviation in the United States hasn’t avoided the chaos. “Airlines need to step up their game,” said Pete Buttigieg, the U.S. transportation secretary, who faced multiple cancellations and delays himself this summer. Still, he’s optimistic that flying will improve this fall. “I do think that a better situation is within reach,” he said.

Airline executives, labor unions and industry analysts agree: Fall travel should be better than the summer. They do not agree on how much better. But most concur that the issues that must be addressed include not enough crew, too many cancellations and delays, problems with refunds and terrible customer service.

One of the major issues this summer was staffing. Between COVID sickouts and a lack of trained employees, many of the airlines just didn’t have enough workers. Airlines for America, a trade organization representing seven major U.S. carriers, says yes, they have improved the situation. “This summer, carriers have proactively adjusted their staffing models to ensure they are adequately staffed for each flight,” they said.

Airline union leaders agree that staffing is adequate, but only on “blue sky days,” the term for those 24-hour periods when nature works in the airlines’ favor. “But when weather hits, they don’t have enough reserves,” he said.

If people were pushing back this summer, you didn’t see it locally. At John Wayne Airport, traffic was up to more than one million passengers in September compared to 783,000 for the same time last year. I suspect Fall will also bring strong numbers as well.

But for many of us, there was an even bigger concern and that is: airlines selling more flights than they can handle. Will they continue with the pandemic trend of canceling flights that they should have never scheduled? Several analysts were optimistic that the airlines had learned from their mistakes. American Airlines, for example, recently slashed 16% of its November flights.

In fact, cancellation rates were far lower in July and August than earlier in the year. Still, the delay rate has recently hovered around 23%, higher than pre-pandemic times or last summer, according to FlightAware, a flight-tracking company.

And there is another important issue: Will the refund, flight change and hotel voucher process get easier? The Transportation Department is pushing forward several initiatives. One involves updating a federal law guiding flight refunds. Under current policies, airlines are supposed to reimburse passengers for flights that have been canceled or “significantly changed.” But carriers have long exploited ambiguity around the term. The proposal, which will be revisited later this month, codifies the conditions under which refunds must be paid.

Finally, there is the matter of customer service. Will Thanksgiving Week be filled with nightmarish stories of unanswered calls to change a flight or locate a lost bag? On this front, industry experts agree, it’s unlikely to get better soon. Airlines see customer service as an area to slash not grow costs.

The airline industry seems to be in the same situation as everyone these days. Things are better but not good enough and certainly not as good as pre- pandemic days.

Still, it doesn’t appear to be stopping people from visiting Newport Beach, as well as other cities around the world. And, at this time of year, when we count our blessings where we can find them, that’s something we can be thankful.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


Take Five: Meet Madison Vitarelli, coordinator of the city’s abandoned vessel auction

By AMY SENK

The City of Newport Beach has held small vessel auctions for years, and the next one is scheduled to take place on Friday, Nov. 18 at the Marina Park Sailing Center at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd. This auction, like others in the past, will include small dinghy vessels, stand-up paddle boards and kayaks that will be sold as-is for cash only, with the winners responsible for removing their newly acquired vessels by 5 p.m. auction day. I have never attended one of these auctions, and I realized I had a lot of questions about how they operate, so I reached out to Madison Vitarelli, a Harbor Department permit technician, to find out more.

Take Five Madison Vitarelli

Photos courtesy of City of Newport Beach Harbor Dept.

Madison Vitarelli

Q: What is the history of abandoned vessel auctions in Newport Beach? 

A: Prior to the formation of the Harbor Department in July 2017, vessel auctions were the responsibility of the Harbor Resources Division. The Harbor Department held its first vessel auction in February 2018 and the Orange County Harbor Patrol joined us and auctioned several vessels. We typically hold an auction three times a year, one in the beginning of the year, another just before summer, and one just before Thanksgiving. During COVID, auctions were put on hold until it became safe to hold an auction again and we had no more space for all the vessels we collected during that time period.

Q: Do the proceeds go back to the city?

A: We start the bidding low and depending on the quality and demand of the item determines the highest bid. All money collected from the auction goes to the city general fund. We plan to have an auction in February or March with our CF and Documented vessels, so stay tuned for another auction.

Take Five Harbor Department

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Harbor Dept. personnel preparing vessels prior to a previous auction

Q: How many vessels will there be in this auction and is there anything particularly special, or that stands out?

A: The types of auctions we hold are either a small vessel auction, such as paddleboards/kayaks and small dinghies or a CF/Coast Guard Documented vessel auction (typically larger vessels that are over 14 feet in length). The auction on Friday, Nov. 18 will be a small vessel auction with about 30 items. Interested parties may arrive at Marina Park at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd, Newport Beach at 9 a.m. to inspect the vessels with the auction starting at 9:30 a.m. 

Take Five bidders

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Bidders at a previous abandoned vessels auction

Q: Who typically attends the auction? 

A: We have a wide range of people who attend these auctions, from permittees to people who live inland and are looking for a deal on recreational equipment. We even have customers from different states that are vacationing here and happen upon the auction. Some of our customers bid on several items and then donate the vessels to different charities for use. 

Q: I see you are a permit technician. What else does that job entail? 

A: In my job as the Permit Technician for the Harbor Department, I manage all the permits for the moorings as well as our live-aboard in the harbor. If you have purchased a mooring in the past years, you most likely have worked with me to get your permit. I work closely with all permittees to make sure we have current documentation for all the vessels on the moorings and when a new vessel arrives, I help coordinate the mandatory vessel inspection prior to the vessel going on the mooring.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


You Must Remember This: skin diving

By NANCY GARDNER

Has any sport changed as much as skin diving? It was one of my father’s favorite pastimes, and when he started, he and his friends had two pieces of equipment – a gunny sack and an abalone iron. That was it. They didn’t even have face masks. They waited for a day when the water was really clear so they could see underwater with the naked eye. Presumably there were a lot of clear days since most of the natural ecosystems hadn’t been paved over and a small population meant less urban runoff and resulting turbidity, but even so, that doesn’t allow for much visual range. They’d have to spot a lobster or abalone among the rocks and algae, and then quickly grab the lobster or, in the case of abalone, place the ab iron in the fraction of an inch between the abalone shell and the rock. The move had to be precise, because a little off and the abalone would instantly seal itself to the rock. Once that happened, nothing could peel it off. If things worked, they put the abalone in the sack or if they forgot the sack, down their trunks. I am assuming abalone did not seal themselves to soft surfaces. I am also assuming they never tried this with lobster.

A change in their skin diving habits occurred when Marco Anich went to Hawaii. My father always said Marco was the best waterman he ever knew. He must have been good because he was accepted by the Hawaiian beach boys, no easy task for a haole. When he came back, he had a pair of rudimentary goggles. Wow! You can picture all these young guys taking turns peering through the goggles. They all needed a pair. And then someone had the bright idea to go to the Japanese fishing village in San Pedro, thinking he might find some there.  He found something even better – an actual face mask. What a world that opened up. Now they could see every blade of eel grass, the mottled surface of kelp – and how much easier to spot abalone and lobster. They didn’t feel they needed anything else, but when fins came along, they proved a nice addition, allowing them to swim more powerfully. It was still pretty much a summertime sport, however, because in the winter water temperatures could get to the low 50s, and it’s pretty hard to swim around in that very long, especially for someone as skinny as my father. How welcome was the introduction of wetsuits, making diving a year-round sport. Snorkels were convenient and then came the big game changer: scuba tanks. My father never got into that. I think he was sort of a purist. In any case, in his later years he would sit on the beach and grin at the scuba divers who lumbered down to the beach with their bulky, expensive equipment. All that money, and for what, he would remark. In his day you could only stay down for as long as you could hold your breath as opposed to the hour or so of a scuba diver, but what did that longer time underwater matter if there were no more abalone and few lobster?

Which made me think of other “improvements” that have come along. In the ‘50s, poor old Coast Highway had fewer lanes and almost zero traffic engineering compared to today, but I’m pretty sure my mother’s putt putt Metropolitan could get to Laguna Beach on those narrow lanes at least as fast as my 21st century Tesla does today, probably faster without all of the current traffic signals and cars.

I might conclude that money and invention don’t always make everything better – but that would be heresy. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Officials speak up about wildfire protection, home insurance coverage

By SARA HALL

Fire and insurance officials spoke this week during a community forum about how residents can protect their homes and keep their coverage. 

The Speak Up Newport meeting held on Wednesday (Nov. 9) presented information on how residents can “harden” their home through landscape and structural improvements and best practices to protect against rising homeowner insurance rates.

About 40 people attended in-person in the community room at the civic center, while more watched the livestream online. 

There have been a lot of local, regional and statewide legislative efforts in response to recent fires, Newport Beach Fire Department Chief Jeff Boyles noted. Locally, this year’s Emerald Fire in Laguna Beach and Coastal Fire in Laguna Niguel are driving some of the work they’re doing in the upcoming fire code adoption, he noted. The City Council is scheduled to review and consider adoption of the 2022 California Fire Code with proposed local amendments at their Tuesday (Nov. 15) meeting.

That work, along with resident efforts to protect their homes and neighborhoods, will hopefully translate to the insurance industry, Boyles said. 

When it comes to wildfire protection, people primarily focus on cutting back vegetation and trees, but it’s a lot more than that, said Newport Beach Fire Marshal Kevin Bass. When he started, the big push was fuel modification zones, he noted. 

“It works great for defense of the homes right up against the urban edge,” Bass said. 

But in 2008, fire officials learned that embers are causing a lot of problems.

“We’re not getting that direct flame hitting the homes and destroying them like we used to see in the ‘70s and the ‘80s, now it’s all embers. Embers are a problem,” Bass explained.

Since 2008, Orange County Fire Authority and other agencies have been talking about how to get homeowners aware of the issue, he said. There wasn’t a big drive until about 2017 with the Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa, which killed 22 people, destroyed 5,636 structures (residential, commercial and other) and burned 36,807 acres.

“That’s when we saw the fire communicate from the wildland area into interior neighborhoods,” Bass said.

It was all through pine needles, he noted, which are used for blocking weeds and retaining water. 

They have since learned a lot about vegetation and how fire communicates, he added. 

“The other thing about that fire is we saw whole neighborhoods destroyed because of embers blowing through ‘70s-style architecture,” said Bass, noting the common wide-mesh screens and wooden roofs and fences.

Orange County Fire Authority, along with Cal Fire, started putting together programs and working with the insurance agency about dealing with fire protection.

“It really came down to simple things that homeowners can do in order to make their houses tougher,” Bass said. 

This allows the homeowner to evacuate and the house “defends itself.”

“A body of armor, you may say,” Bass said. 

Through a lot of testing, they’ve learned a lot about how embers hit houses and how residents can harden their home, he noted. 

Ensuring that the roof is in good shape and made from materials that won’t easily ignite is the first thing to check, Bass said. 

Next, the fence is often the “weak spot.” Embers can blow through 1/4-inch openings, he noted. 

“The difference between 1/4-inch and 1/8-inch is astronomical in terms of the protection levels,” Bass said. 

The fire blowing through fences was evident in the Coastal Fire, he added. 

Officials speak up about wildfire protection Coastal Fire

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Photo by Cyrus Polk

The Coastal Fire burns near homes in Laguna Beach in May

He also recommended checking the vents, windows and vegetation that abuts the house. 

Residents can call NBFD for individual home assessments. HOAs can also request a neighborhood evaluation.

Hardening individual homes, taking care of the vegetation, and putting together a community-wide plan is in sync with what the Department of Insurance is asking for, Bass said. 

They are in step with what the department has asked in terms of bringing homeowners to the table to see what they can do to make their homes tougher and neighborhoods safer, which in turn helps solve the insurance crisis, Bass said. 

Julia Juarez, deputy commissioner of the California Department of Insurance (CDI), summarized what the CA Department of Insurance does and the role of Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara. The CDI has met with more than 50,000 residents to hear concerns, she noted. 

They’ve worked to remove barriers to allow wildfire survivors to receive critical insurance benefits, Juarez said. This includes ensuring coverage for evacuation expenses, extensions to additional living expenses, and creating disclosures and coverage to meet updated building codes. 

In the case of the Camp Fire in Paradise in 2018, people couldn’t move back into their homes because there was no electricity or utilities. 

“We made sure that that was fixed and also made sure that additional living expenses were reviewed and covered,” Juarez said. 

She also explained the one-year moratorium from non-renewals, so people have time after a fire (that’s been declared a state emergency) to organize and shop for new insurance policies. 

“That has given people a little bit more breathing room for them to be able to do what they need to,” Juarez said.

For communities that can’t take advantage of the moratorium, they were able to increase the non-renewal notice from 45 days to 75 days.

Juarez also discussed the FAIR Plan, which provides California property owners with access to basic fire insurance coverage for high-risk properties when traditional market insurance companies will not. It’s “the insurance of last resort for the state,” she said.

It hasn’t been updated in about 20 years and Lara has been working on improving it, Juarez noted. They hosted an investigatory hearing on July 13 to gather public feedback on the shortcomings of the plan and how it can better serve homeowners. 

It’s a patchwork effort, but they needed to do something statewide to make everyone safer, she said. Something that everyone can follow to make their homes and communities safer and get insurance companies to provide coverage.

Safer from Wildfires in 1-2-3” was launched in January as an interagency partnership between the CDI and the state’s emergency response and readiness agencies to protect lives, homes and businesses by reducing fire risk.

Step one is to protect the structure, which the plan provides details on what to do including the recommendations from Bass about roofing and fencing. Second, the plan urges residents to protect their immediate surroundings, including creating a defensible space. And the third step is to work together as a community to protect the neighborhood.

The commissioner “wanted to have some teeth behind this,” Juarez said, so regulations to lower costs and increase transparency were put into place. 

The new rules require insurance companies to provide discounts to homeowners and businesses for hardening their homes. They also provide consumers with transparency about their “wildfire risk score” that insurance companies assign to properties. It also gives consumers the right to appeal their risk determination. Insurance companies have until April 12 to submit plans on how they will incorporate the new regulations. 

“Now what we’re seeing is that the framework is working,” Juarez said. 

There are several insurance companies already offering these discounts, she pointed out. 

Premium discounts are now available to two out of every five consumers, with up to 20% discounts for wildfire-hardened homes, Juarez said. 

Bass also mentioned that HOAs can be recognized as a firewise” community through the National Fire Protection Association. The firewise recognition is a program that provides a collaborative framework to help neighbors in a geographic area get organized, find direction, and take action to increase the ignition resistance of their homes and community and to reduce wildfire risks at the local level.

It’s a landscape program that allows communities to still have a “theme” while meeting the framework’s criteria. The community plan gets reviewed and adopted at the local jurisdiction and then submitted to NFPA for the recognition. 

“It’s a significant process, but once you get through to the end you are recognized as doing something really special and protecting your community,” Bass said. 

Bass and his team will meet with any HOA who invites them to start the process.

They are also launching a Newport Beach Fire Safe Council. Through the new council, they aim to create several committees, one of which will be a firewise group meant to educate homeowners and HOAs.

His goal would be for each HOA in Newport Beach to have their own firewise plan, Bass said. That way every neighborhood can design it how they see fit since what may work for one won’t work for another, he noted.

 ~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Police Chief Jon Lewis announces his retirement; oh, and then there’s that election

TJ headshot AugNot many things could push this week’s election counts/results to the second part of this column but knowing the importance of our police department in this community, I felt you’d understand. 

Jon Lewis, our beloved Chief of Police, has announced his retirement effective December 31. First off, I was somewhat stunned by this news because I’m such a fan of Jon and the entire Newport Beach Police Department.

I spoke with Jon yesterday afternoon and he told me the decision was “bittersweet.” He admitted that although he likes being our chief, he’ll actually “just miss being a cop more than anything.” He says the time is right because the department is running well and he feels now is the time that he can hand it off comfortably.

Jon is a rare breed that started at the NBPD at the bottom of the barrel as a part-timer while completing his college degree in criminal justice back in 1991 (Cal State Long Beach). From there, he worked his way through the ranks to the top of the heap, obviously finding success at every step.

He will absolutely be missed.

The good news is, Deputy Chief Joe Cartwright, who has held a variety of field and command-level positions in his 20 years with the department, will serve as acting chief while a search is conducted for Lewis’ successor.

Take it from the Chief, Joe is a good guy!

• • •

The winners of the City Council races appear to be Joe Stapleton in District 1, Erik Weigand in District 3, Robyn Grant in District 4 and Lauren Kleiman in District 6.

Why are we still using the term “appear” several days after Election Day? Well, OC Registrar of Voters’ Bob Page estimates that some 356,888 votes remain uncounted throughout Orange County. There’s no telling what percent of that remains for Newport Beach.

In a race that saw some $1,000,000 involved, Stapleton beat Tom Miller in what unfortunately became a nasty race. Joe currently has 62.73% of the vote.

Fair Game SNN 11.11 Stapleton pointing at board

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Photo by Alexandra Taylor

Joe Stapleton gleefully points to results showing early returns at his election night celebration at the Lido House Hotel

Moving to District 3, Weigand easily beat Jim Mosher and Amy Peters garnering 56.34% of the vote. Mosher, incidentally, received 27.06% with Peters at 16.60%.

Fair Game SNN 11.11 Erik surrounded by women

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Photo by Tom Johnson

Erik Weigand celebrates with the “moms from Mariners” neighbors at his election night party at the Snipe Island Crafthouse on Balboa Island

The one sure race result was Robyn Grant in District 4, who ran unopposed.

In District 6, challenger Lauren Kleiman, the chair of the Planning Commission, beat incumbent Joy Brenner with 53.12%. Although Kleiman trailed in early counts, she came storming back with the 11:30 p.m. Tuesday night counts and has never looked back.

Two other local races involved our Newport-Mesa Unified School District. In Area 4, Lisa Pearson turned back Barbara George and Kristen Valle. Pearson received almost 57% of the votes, with George just under 34% and Valle under 10%.

In Area 5, incumbent board chair Michelle Barto easily beat Reina Shebesta with more than 65% of the votes cast.

Both Pearson and Barto fought successfully against what appeared to be divisive representatives from a group calling themselves Newport Uncensored, who in reality actually professed certain censorships and seemed to favor an agenda challenging Sacramento policies forced on NMUSD.

• • •

In local congressional races, Democrat Mike Levin leads Republican Brian Maryott by some 4,000 votes of more than 180,000 ballots cast in the 49th District and Democrat Katie Porter is beating Republican Scott Baugh in the 47th by 3,000 votes, after 183,000 cast.

Elsewhere, Republican Diane Dixon defeats Democrat Judie Mancuso in the 72nd Assembly District with 56.71% of the vote; in the State Senate 36th District, Republican Janet Nguyen wins over Democrat Kim Carr with some 59% of the vote; while in the Fifth Orange County Supervisorial District, Democrat Katrina Foley is ahead of Republican Pat Bates, with 51.13% of the votes.

Fair Game Katrina and Cottie

Photo by Barbara McMurray

(L-R) Katrina Foley is all smiles as she celebrated early results in her OC Supervisorial race with Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris. Petrie-Norris was also a victor on the evening, winning a new seat representing the Irvine area.

• • •

The Hoag Hospital Foundation announced this week the launch of Boldly Hoag, a $300 million capital campaign to support the ambitious expansion of Hoag’s Irvine campus.

Three bold, interconnective initiatives are supported by the campaign: elevating the patient experience, recruiting and retaining the nation’s brightest health care professionals and defining and building the future of health.   

“Hoag is elevating health care and wellness in Orange County by transforming our delivery of care to an integrated, specialized services-based model,” said Hoag President and CEO Robert T. Braithwaite. “The benefits this expansion will bring to the communities we serve can’t be overstated.” 

The expansion in Irvine will include six new buildings, two new parking structures, 155 inpatient beds, eight operating rooms and two additional procedure rooms, 120,000 square feet of ambulatory facilities and substantial renovations to the existing facilities.    

So, how do you make a capital campaign of this magnitude successful? It fortunately starts with a transformational $50 million gift from Diana and David Sun

David is the co-founder of Kingston Technology and said about the couple’s gift, “It’s no more important or meaningful than any other gift to Hoag, no matter the amount, if it comes from the heart and is made in the hope of helping others. Diana and I simply hope our gift will inspire others to give whatever they can.” 

• • •

Can you believe it? The Traditional Tree Lighting Ceremony is planned for next Thursday, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Town Park Center adjacent to The Westin South Coast Plaza. The Segerstrom Family invites you to join them for their beautiful tree lighting, with a magical performance by the Orange County School of the Arts, a holiday celebration complete with snow and, of course, a visit from the fat guy in the red suit. 

It’s all complimentary.

• • •

Maybe you want to go to the 43rd Annual Corona del Mar Christmas Walk on Sunday, Dec. 4…or, maybe you’d like to volunteer and get right in the middle of the action. 

Volunteer opportunities include event set-up, beer & wine garden servers (no sipping), ID checkers, beer garden ticket sales, hot dog sales and more. There are a number of shifts for you to work with.

For volunteer info go to www.cdmchamber.com/christmas-walk-volunteer-submittal/.


Corona del Mar jetty

Corona del Mar Jetty

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Photo by Stacia Stabler

A fall storm was in the air in Newport Beach this week


Inspiration Point

Inspiration Point

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Photo by Stacia Stabler

A cozy and cloudy fall morning in CdM


Police Chief Jon Lewis announces his retirement effective year’s end

Jon Lewis, a longtime veteran of the Newport Beach Police Department who rose through the ranks to become chief of police in 2016, has announced his retirement, effective December 31. 

“While we will miss his leadership tremendously, Chief Lewis leaves behind an exceptional department that will ensure the continuation of excellent public safety service to our community,” City Manager Grace Leung said. “We thank Chief Lewis for his many years of service and wish him the very best in retirement.” 

Police Chief Jon Lewis

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of NB

Newport Beach Chief of Police Jon Lewis has announced his retirement

Deputy Chief Joe Cartwright, who has held a variety of field and command-level positions in 20 years with the department, will serve as acting chief while a search is conducted for Lewis’ successor, Leung said. 

Lewis is the 10th Chief of Police in the Newport Beach Police Department’s history. He leads a staff of 233 full-time employees, who serve in four divisions and a variety of specialized units. 

Lewis began his law enforcement career with the Police Department in 1991, working part-time while completing a degree in criminal justice from Cal State Long Beach. During his tenure as chief, the Newport Beach Police Department implemented effective crime-reduction strategies such as data-driven community policing and excellence in emergency response and 911 call answer times. Under his leadership, the department developed innovative wellness initiatives in collaboration with national experts, resulting in higher morale, productivity and police service improvements.

He has also been highly involved in the Newport Beach community and law enforcement organizations during his time in office. He served as a board member for the California Police Chiefs Association, as president of the Orange County Chiefs of Police and Sheriffs Association, among many other boards, committees, commissions and task forces.


Council agenda includes property purchase for future police station replacement, updated fire code, Mariners traffic calming measures

By SARA HALL

City Council has several interesting items on a packed agenda next week. 

At the Tuesday (Nov. 15) meeting, council will consider: The purchase of a property for a future police station replacement; updated fire code amendments; Mariners neighborhood traffic calming measures and an ordinance related to nonconforming code and Local Coastal Program amendments.

The last item on the agenda is the council’s consideration of the purchase of the property at 1201 Dove St. for $30.5 million for a future police station replacement facility. 

The Newport Beach Police Department is currently headquartered on the city-owned property at 870 Santa Barbara Drive. The building is within 10 years of the end of its useful life, and, according to the staff report, NBPD operations have outgrown the existing facility. 

The Dove Street property is located in the airport area on a 3.59-acre site currently developed with an 82,868-square-foot, six-story office building. The building was constructed in 1973 and underwent a major renovation in 1989, with various system upgrades and maintenance and tenant improvements completed since then. The property was acquired by AG Dove Owner, L.P. an institutional investor, in 2018. The building is currently 84% leased to 21 tenants for finance, healthcare, real estate, legal and other services and uses. 

NBPD and other city staff toured the property in March and determined the general location, size and configuration to be sufficient and appropriate for development of a new police station. Access to the property is located on Dove Street, and staff will work with the adjacent property owners to determine if a secondary point of access to Quail Street can be obtained.

Council agenda includes property purchase current police station

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Courtesy of NBPD

The current Newport Beach Police Department headquarters 

The police facility replacement is already planned for in the Capital Improvement Program. 

“The city’s long-range strategic plan is to purchase property and manage it for the next 10 years or until the city is in a position to develop a new police station headquarters,” staff explain in the report. “Acquiring property now to develop a new police station will allow the city to capitalize on current real estate prices, avoid competing with residential developers seeking housing opportunity sites and recoup a portion of the purchase price with the property’s existing net income stream.”

On Tuesday, council will consider an agreement for purchase and sale of real property and escrow instructions for the purchase of property located at 1201 Dove St. for a price of $30.5 million, utilizing FY 2021-22 year-end general fund surplus and unallocated capital project reserve funds. 

“Given the limited number of parcels of a suitable size for a new police station and the upward trend of commercial real estate values in Newport Beach, staff proposes for the city to purchase the property and to continue leasing the office spaces. The net income generated from the property will help offset the purchase price,” the staff report reads.

The current site of police headquarters on Santa Barbara was acquired by the city in 1973 from The Irvine Company. The facility was constructed according to the building code standards of that time. Since then, the seismic structural design requirements have changed for facilities considered “essential” (police, fire, hospitals) and are now designed to a much higher seismic standard than non-essential buildings. NBPD shares the four-acre parcel with fire station no. 3.

“While it is possible to structurally upgrade the existing police station, it is more cost effective to replace the building due to the future facility space and utilization needs,” the staff report reads. “A new police station facility will be structurally designed to the highest seismic standard required by the building codes.”

While the facility and property have been maintained and remodeled over the last 50 years, NBPD operations have expanded and effectively outgrown the site, according to staff. 

“The city has a need to replace the existing police station with a larger more modern facility that will meet the future needs of the police department,” the report reads.

A utilization survey of the spaces within the existing police station and conducted a needs assessment to determine the needs of a future police station. The study determined a future police facility will require a minimum of 73,000 square feet (current space sits at 49,284 square feet of gross floor area). The differences between the existing facility and the future needs of the police department include adequate space for the patrol division, and an appropriately laid-out firearms training and shooting range.

Staff considered replacing the existing NBPD station at its current location, but determined the replacement cost would outweigh the costs to relocate the facility to a new location. Costs for redevelopment on-site would include temporarily relocating police operations during construction, including jail services and the helicopter landing pad. 

During regular business, council will review the Mariners neighborhood traffic calming measures.

On Jan. 12, 2021, the City Council directed staff to implement neighborhood traffic calming measures including installing speed cushions on various streets throughout the Dover Shores and Mariners neighborhoods. This direction followed the preparation of an extensive traffic calming study, three neighborhood meetings to discuss the issue, and submission of a petition from the residents showing 60% support within the entire neighborhood for the project. The speed cushions were installed in July 2021. 

As a follow-up to this neighborhood traffic calming project, staff completed post installation speed surveys. The results of the follow-up speed measurements showed a reduction of speeds of 3 mph to 9 mph on the streets within the neighborhood.

Recently staff received some concerns from residents adjacent to 1911 Highland Drive in the Mariners neighborhood about the speed cushion that was installed near their homes. The concerns from the residents are related to noise. Staff met with the residents at the speed cushion location on November 2 to discuss their concerns. At the meeting, the residents requested the speed cushion be relocated or removed entirely. Although staff noted that there are challenges related to relocating the speed cushion and potential negative impacts with removal of the speed cushion.

Council agenda includes property purchase fire

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of NBPD

Firefighters respond to a house fire in Big Canyon in April

Council will also hold a public hearing and consider adoption of the 2022 California building standards codes and the 2022 California fire code, both with local amendments.

The city enforces state model building standards and fire codes for the purpose of regulating design and construction of all structures to protect life and property. Every three years, the state adopts new codes. Local agencies must adopt the same codes and make amendments with specific findings 30 days prior to the Jan. 1, 2023, effective date of the new codes.

Some of the key amendments proposed for incorporation into the NBMC:

–NBMC Section 15.02.085 would require the permittee to use a city franchised solid waste enterprise for handling removal and disposal of all construction and demolition waste for a demolition permit, for complete demolition of a structure. This provision was inadvertently omitted with the adoption of Ordinance No. 2010-23.

–NBMC Section 15.04.090 would exempt the fire sprinklers requirement for accessory dwelling units when the existing primary residence is not equipped with fire sprinklers. The construction of an accessory dwelling unit shall not trigger the requirement for fire sprinklers to be installed in the existing building.

–NBMC Section 15.19.060 would incorporate the timeline requirements for acceptance and approval of permit applications for the installation of electric vehicle charging stations. These timeline requirements are compliant with AB 970 (Chapter 710, Statutes 2021) which becomes operative on January 1, 2023, for cities with a population of less than 200,000 residents.

–NBMC Section 15.50 would be revised to clarify the definition of Design Flood Elevation and to incorporate the requirement for one foot of freeboard above the Base Flood Elevation for minimum height of the lowest floor for new and substantially improved/damaged buildings in Special Flood Hazard Areas. The one-foot freeboard requirement is intended to be consistent with the changes in minimum requirements for the Community Rating System (CRS) implemented by the “Addendum to the 2017 CRS Coordinator’s Manual,” which was issued by FEMA and went into effect on January 1, 2021.

–NBMC Section 9.04.380 would require the property owners of existing structures to be improved with the installation of 1/8” mesh screening to protect ventilation openings from ember intrusion in the event of a wildfire. This amendment is consistent with the Cal Fire Low Cost Retrofit document request for homeowners to improve their homes and other structures from flying hot embers during a wind driven wildfire.

–NBMC Section 9.04.385 would require property owners to trim existing trees from hanging over or touching structures to reduce burning vegetation from igniting structures. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety, in cooperation with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends no trees within five (5) feet of structures to reduce the spread of burning vegetation to the structures.

–NBMC 9.04.386 would require property owners to create and maintain a one-foot wide noncombustible zone at the base of new and existing structures to prevent falling embers from igniting structures in the event of a wildfire. The California Department of Insurance’s recently published Safer from Wildfire program recommends a six-inch wide noncombustible zone at the base of structures to protect from embers during a wildfire. Newport Beach Fire Department recommends a one-foot zone for additional separation from existing mature residential landscaping within the established Very High Fire Severity Zone.

Council will hold a hearing to consider an ordinance related to nonconforming code and Local Coastal Program amendments

The amendments proposed are to Title 20 (Planning and Zoning) and Title 21 (Local Coastal Program Implementation Plan). The amendments include two parts: Clarifying development allowances for residential uses that are nonconforming due to density; and reinstating a side setback allowance for properties in certain residential zoning and coastal zoning districts. The side setback allowance would allow additions in line with the principal structure regardless of the current minimum side setback standards.

The council agenda is available online here. The regular meeting will begin at 4 p.m. (there is no study session this week).

The meeting can be watched live on the local NBTV channel (Spectrum 3 or Cox 852) or on the city’s website here.

Members of the public may speak in person in council chambers (there is not a remote or online option to participate).

Questions and comments can be submitted in writing for City Council consideration by sending them to the city clerk at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To give the council adequate time to review comments, submit any written comments by 5 p.m. on November 14 (the day before the City Council meeting). Correspondence received by this deadline will be uploaded to the agenda packet by November 14 at 5:30 p.m. and can be viewed here

Material received after the deadline and prior to 2 p.m. on November 15 (the day of the meeting) will be provided to the council in hard copy and will be available to the public at the meeting.

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Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Preliminary election results show some clear council winners, newcomer poised to unseat an incumbent

By SARA HALL

While votes are still being added up across Orange County, it looks as though Newport Beach will see four new faces on City Council.

The leads in each district are significant, including District 6, where a newcomer looks poised to unseat an incumbent.

According to the Thursday evening update from the Orange County Registrar of Voters, 14,964 ballots, or 62.73% of the vote, were cast in favor of Joe Stapleton in District 1. Tom Miller had received 8,891 votes at the time of the latest update. 

In District 3, the only race with three candidates, Erik Weigand received 13,193 votes, or 56.34%, while Jim Mosher had 6,335, or 27.06% and Amy Peters trailed with 3,887, or 16.6%.

In District 4, Robyn Grant ran unopposed and received 19,183 votes as of Thursday.

 The closest margin is in District 6, but the gap widened with the latest update showing Lauren Kleiman with 12,444 votes, or 53.12%, and Joy Brenner with 10,983 votes.

Although Newport Beach candidates are voted on in each district, when elected to City Council they represent all districts equally and discuss/vote on issues/projects in every district and citywide.

Preliminary election results council winners.jpg USE

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Preliminary election results show (left to right) Joe Stapleton, Erik Weigand, Robyn Grant and Lauren Kleiman as the winners of the City Council seats

In the only race with an incumbent running, District 6 was hotly contested during the campaign. 

In an email to Stu News Newport on Wednesday, Kleiman noted that it was too early to call.

  “If I ultimately win, I look forward to serving our entire city honorably,” Kleiman said, adding that she enjoyed meeting residents and discussing issues during the campaign. “During this election, I have really enjoyed the opportunity to talk with residents throughout our great city. These conversations centered on our shared core values, with an emphasis on the importance of public safety.

“My thanks to Joy for running a race where we could focus on the issues that are important to voters, including where we find agreement,” Kleiman added.

At the time of publication, Brenner could not be reached for comment. 

In District 1, another contentious race this year, Stapleton has an essentially insurmountable lead. 

During a phone interview with Stu News Newport on Wednesday, Stapleton said he is looking forward to the rest of the votes being counted.

“I feel really confident with where we are at the moment,” he added. “If the margin holds, I’m going to do everything I can to serve the City of Newport with everything I have.”

It was an incredible journey and he’s looking forward to getting to work in this role.

“I’ve already been serving the city for years, this is the continuation of my community service to another level,” Stapleton said. 

The next steps are about moving forward and getting down to business, he said. He’s focused on the future, while celebrating the past. The first thing he wants to tackle is homelessness, which was a top issue during the campaign.

“I truly believe this election was all about public safety and keeping Newport, Newport,” Stapleton said. “I’m focused on preserving the legacy of the utopia of Newport Beach.”

He’s proven that he’s a hard worker and he’ll bring that same commitment to council, Stapleton said. They share similar goals and values, he noted, and all aim to maintain the high quality of life in Newport Beach. 

He also thanked his supporters and volunteers who helped during the campaign. 

To those who didn’t vote for him, Stapleton said he’s looking forward to earning their support in the future. 

Stapleton also commended his opponent.

“Tom Miller ran an incredible campaign and he made me run the strongest campaign I knew how,” Stapleton said. “I’m so appreciative of his service to our community and hope he stays involved.”

In the crowded District 3 race, Weigand has the largest lead compared to the other competitive races. 

During a phone interview with Stu News Newport on Wednesday, Weigand said, as a lifetime resident, this is the best opportunity he has to give back to the city he loves. 

“I’m really excited and honored to be elected to this role,” Weigand said. 

He’s looking forward to working with both the new and existing councilmembers. With the potential for four new members, there’s likely to be a bit of a learning curve, he added. Although Weigand, and Kleiman if she stays in the lead in District 6, both have experience on the Planning Commission, which helps on several levels, Weigand pointed out. 

“I’m proud of myself on being a consensus builder,” he said.

The forums and discussions during the campaign raised a lot of noteworthy issues, Weigand said, and he’ll serve all residents, both those who supported him and those who didn’t. It’s important to be mindful of the different opinions, he added. 

“I’ll keep the door open to everyone,” Weigand said. “We should work together and solve the issues in front of us.”

Weigand is ready to hit the ground running. 

Once he’s sworn in, Weigand has several issues he’s looking to focus on, including implementing his 10-point plan on addressing sober homes. He also hopes to tackle concerns regarding property crime, public safety and homelessness. 

On social media, Mosher thanked his supporters, as well as his opponents for running a clean campaign.

“I would like to thank the many friends and supporters who voted for me. And my opponents for not stooping to the name-calling and innuendo that infected campaigns in the other districts,” Mosher said. 

He also congratulated the winners. 

In District 4, the lone candidate received 100% of the vote and Grant’s election to council is guaranteed. 

In a message she shared with Stu News Newport, Grant said she’s looking forward to working with her council colleagues to keep Newport Beach safe and thriving. 

“My number one priority is to be accountable to the residents and provide transparent and independent leadership,” she said.

The new role is continuing her longstanding commitment to public service in Newport Beach.

“Ours is an exceptional city. Great cities don’t just happen. They are built by strong leaders with vision and determination. Newport Beach has a legacy of that kind of leadership, and I will continue that legacy,” Grant said. “I look forward to the next four years serving on the City Council and being a part of the real progress to be made in keeping our community the best place to live, work, visit and raise a family.”

Regarding regional representatives, Katrina Foley (D-Costa Mesa) beat out Pat Bates (R-Laguna Niguel) for Orange County Board of Supervisors, District 5. As of Thursday evening, Foley had gathered 81,530 votes (51.13%), widening her gap over Bates, who has received 77,917 so far. 

With each update, Foley said she was “cautiously optimistic” about retaining her lead. On Wednesday on social media, she noted that there are many votes left to count, but that she remains in a “strong position to win.” 

In state races, party preference dominated the recently redrawn districts that cover the city as both were comfortably leaning toward the Republican candidates as of Thursday evening: Diane Dixon (R-Newport Beach) was ahead of Judie Mancuso (D-Laguna Beach) for the 72nd Assembly District; while Janet Nguyen (R-Huntington Beach) led over Kim Carr (D-Huntington Beach) in the contest for the 36th Senate District. 

Dixon had a total of 83,202 ballots cast in her favor, or 56.71%, as of Thursday evening, compared to Mancuso’s 63,514. Both had acknowledged the likely result of the race, which is unlikely to change as the final ballots are counted. 

In a message, Dixon thanked her supporters and noted her hefty lead. 

“I am more optimistic than ever before as more votes are counted,” she said on Thursday. “I am looking forward to serving as your next Assemblywoman and am beyond grateful for your support!” 

In a newsletter message on Thursday, Mancuso said it’s become clear that her candidacy has come up short, although she was grateful for the experience. 

“Coming into the race, we knew we faced tough odds in a district that heavily favored Republicans, but we gave it our all and I’m so proud of the campaign we ran,” Mancuso said. 

She thanked her supporters and wished Dixon the best in Sacramento, 

As of Thursday evening, Nguyen garnered 132,576 votes, or 58.73%, well ahead of Carr’s 93,176 votes. 

Nguyen also thanked her supporters and said she’s honored to have traveled throughout the district during the campaign. 

“I am so blessed to have had the outpouring of support from every corner the district,” she said, thanking her staff for their work as well. “We might be small, but mighty and a force to be reckoned with.” 

Countywide, officials estimated on Thursday that a total of 356,888 ballots were left to process. 

Results are updated at 5 p.m. each weekday until the election is certified by the Registrar of Voters. 

In the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustee races, Lisa Pearson (Area 4) and Michelle Barto (Area 5) both beat their challengers by significant margins.

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Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


It’s Stapleton, Grant, Weigand and Kleiman for council…Pearson and Barto for School Board

Newport Beach appears to have selected Joe Stapleton, Robyn Grant, Erik Weigand and Lauren Kleiman for their four open City Council seats.

Stapleton is comfortably ahead in the District 1 race following Thursday evening’s updated counts with almost 63% of the vote over Tom Miller. 

In District 3, Weigand is easily outdistancing Jim Mosher and Amy Peters. Weigand has 56.31% of the votes, more than doubling Mosher’s 27.02% and Peters’ 16.67%.

Additionally, Kleiman has moved comfortably ahead of incumbent Joy Brenner, with 53.09% of the vote in District 6.

Winners in each of the races will join Grant, from District 4, who ran unopposed.

In the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustee races, Lisa Pearson and Michelle Barto have also comfortably won their seats. 

Pearson, in Area 4, has 56.81% of the vote, far outdistancing Barbara George with 33.72% and Kristen Valle with 9.47%.

Next door, in Area 5, incumbent board chair Barto easily beat Reina Shebesta with her 65.47% of the votes. 

Other local area races include the 47th Congressional seat showing Democrat Katie Porter holding a slim margin over Republican Scott Baugh with 50.45% of the 171,000 votes cast, holding a 1,552-vote lead; while in the 49th Congressional race, incumbent Democrat Mike Levin leads Republican Brian Maryott in a race that’s tightened up, with 176,000 votes counted. Levin has 51.1% of the vote.

In state races, Republican Newport Beach City Councilmember Diane Dixon is headed for Sacramento in the 72nd Assembly race with a comfortable 19,000 vote lead over Laguna Beach Democrat Judie Mancuso, garnering 57% of the votes cast. In the State Senate 36th District, Republican Janet Nguyen was comfortably ahead of Democrat Kim Carr with 58.92% of the votes.

Closer to home in the County of Orange Board of Supervisors race, Democrat Katrina Foley continues to lead Republican Pat Bates by 3,000 votes of more than 150,000 cast in the District 5 contest.

Next updates from the Orange County Registrar of Voters will be at 5 p.m. today, Thursday, Nov. 10.


How local race stands after counting concludes Tuesday, with further updates today at 5 p.m.

With the biggest impacts hitting with the 11:30 p.m. voter counts, some local races solidified, while others took dramatic flips.

In local Newport Beach City Council races, Joe Stapleton was comfortably ahead in the District 1 race with almost 63% of the vote, leading Tom Miller by nearly 6,000 votes of the 23,000 cast.

In District 3, Erik Weigand ran ahead throughout the evening, easily outdistancing Jim Mosher and Amy Peters. Weigand had 56.32% of the votes, more than doubling Mosher’s 27.02% and Peters’ 16.66%.

The surprise of the evening came when in District 6, Lauren Kleimann, trailing most of the evening, took a comfortable lead with 53.07% of the votes over incumbent Joy Brenner.

Winners in each of the races will join Robyn Grant, from District 4, who ran unopposed.

In local Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustee races, Lisa Pearson ended the evening with 56.83% of the vote in Area 4, trailed by Barbara George’s 33.7% and Kristen Valle’s 9.46%.

Next door, in Area 5, incumbent board chair Michelle Barto was comfortably ahead with 65.47% of the votes in her race with challenger Reina Shebesta.

Other local area races include the 47th Congressional seat showing Democrat Katie Porter slightly ahead of Republican Scott Baugh with 50.29% of the 168,000 votes cast, holding a 978-vote lead.

In state races, Republican Newport Beach City Councilmember Diane Dixon appears headed for Sacramento in the 72nd Assembly race with a comfortable 19,000+ vote lead over Laguna Beach Democrat Judie Mancuso, garnering 57% of the votes cast. In the State Senate 34th District, Republican Janet Nguyen was comfortably ahead of Democrat Kim Carr with 57.04% of the votes.

Closer to home in the County of Orange Board of Supervisors race, Democrat Katrina Foley was edging Republican Pat Bates by 3,000 votes of more than 147,000 cast in the District 5 contest.

Next updates from the Orange County Registrar of Voters will be at 5 p.m. today, Wednesday, Nov. 9.


Take a bite out of this funny adaptation of Snow White at SCR

South Coast Repertory (SCR Artistic Director David Ivers and Managing Director Paula Tomei) gives a children’s classic a modern twist with its Theatre for Young Audiences and Families production of Snow White. Adapted by Greg Banks and directed by H. Adam Harris, Snow White runs November 4-20 on the Julianne Argyros Stage.

“Greg Banks’ adaptation is a fantastic theatrical adventure that takes a traditional theatrical story that’s in our canon and brings it with a furious, hilarious and inventive immediacy,” Ivers said. “It’s in some ways groundbreaking, in terms of theatricality, but in other ways, it’s groundbreaking in terms of representation and I think those are all the things that are important to us as an institution.

“H. Adam brings a wealth of experience and a wealth of assets to this organization and one of them is knowing how to lead a room as a director.”

As director, Harris brings extensive familiarity with Banks’ work. Harris played Baloo/Father Wolf in Jungle Book and Smaug/Kili in The Hobbit, both written and directed by Banks.

Banks’ adaptation of Snow White features only two actors and SCR’s cast is diverse in experience and background: Snow White is played by Candace Nicholas-Lippman, and Dwarf Four is played by Derek Manson. In this twist on the children’s classic, Snow White is reclaiming her story and acting out what really happened after her new mother took over as queen. With six of the Seven Dwarves missing, Nicholas-Lippman and Manson play all 14 roles in a super-fast, whip-smart, hilarious game of switcheroo.

Take a bite Nicolas Lippman and Manson

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of SCR

In this funny adaptation of “Snow White,” actors Derek Manson and Candace Nicholas-Lippman play all 14 roles

“I love Greg Banks plays. They are dynamic, heart-forward and require equal amounts of joy and rigor,” Harris said. “That’s the type of Theatre for Young Audiences and Families I love to see. We’ve assembled a terrific duo of performers and the creative team is embracing the challenge of bringing this story to life. I’m honored to work on this story that puts Snow White at the center of her narrative. Her story in this play reminds us of the power of storytelling, imagination, community and what happens when we invite more compassion into our lives. I believe great things happen when we tell our own story, and in this version, Snow White gets to do precisely that.”

Telling that story is SCR newcomer Nicholas-Lippman, whose credits include starring as a regular in the hit TV series, Blindspotting on Starz, a recurring role on the Freeform/Hulu television series Good Trouble, a guest star role on ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy, a recurring role on FB Watch Series, Grounded, Nick Bottom in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Elizabeth in In The Next Room, which earned her an LA Scenie Award and an LA Weekly Award nomination for Best Supporting Female. In 2018, Nicholas-Lippman debuted her solo show A Rose Called Candace to critical acclaim, followed by multiple successful runs including being featured in the 26th Annual Los Angeles Women’s Theatre Festival in the spring of 2019. That fall, A Rose Called Candace traveled to the East Coast where it made its off-Broadway debut in the United Solo Theatre Festival.

No stranger to SCR, Manson returns to the theater after regaling audiences with his hilarious portrayals of Russ the Bus and Reggie in last spring’s Tiger Style! by Mike Lew. Before that, he appeared as Snoopy in the Outside SCR production of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, the Centipede and Aunt Spiker in James and the Giant Peach, Steve in Jane of the Jungle and in the 2022 Pacific Playwrights Festival reading of A Million Tiny Pieces. His directorial credits include Einstein is a Dummy (Sierra Madre Playhouse) and Political Pop-Ups (Open Fist Theatre).

Harris directed Redwood by Brittany K. Allen at the Jungle Theater last winter. He has directed plays at the William Inge Festival, Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, Theater Mu and various universities. Along with Jungle Book and The Hobbit, Harris’ acting credits include Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, The Snowy Day and How the Grinch Stole Christmas, among others. He has also worked onstage with Guthrie Theater, Penumbra Theatre, The Old Globe, Seattle Children’s Theater, New Conservatory Theater Center, Pillsbury House Theatre, Minnesota Orchestra and St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. A teaching artist at SCR’s Conservatory, he currently serves as SCR’s Artistic/Audience Engagement Associate.

Tickets are on sale at www.scr.org. Snow White is suitable for children 4 years old and up.

South Coast Repertory is located at 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scr.org.


Moulin Rouge! The Musical opens on November 9 at Segerstrom Center

The Costa Mesa premiere of the Tony Award-winning Best Musical Moulin Rouge! The Musical is coming to Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ Segerstrom Hall for a limited three-week engagement from November 9-27. 

Produced by Carmen Pavlovic, Bill Damaschke and Gerry Ryan, the cast is led by Courtney Reed as Satine and Conor Ryan as Christian, as well as Austin Durant as Harold Zidler, André Ward as Toulouse-Lautrec, David Harris as The Duke of Monroth, Gabe Martínez as Santiago and Libby Lloyd as Nini. Yvette Gonzalez-Nacer is the Satine Alternate. The cast includes Nicci Claspell, Harper Miles, Andrés Quintero, Adrienne Balducci, Andrew Brewer, Jack Cahill-Lemme, Sam J. Cahn, Darius Crenshaw, Alexander Gil Cruz, Alexa De Barr, Tamrin Goldberg, Alexis Hasbrouck, Jordan Fife Hunt, Justin Keats, Tyler John Logan, Tanisha Moore, Brayden Newby, Kent Overshown, Amy Quanbeck, Ayden Pratt, Adéa Michelle Sessoms, Jenn Stafford, Denzel Tsopnang, Travis Ward-Osborne, Sharrod Williams, Jennifer Wolfe and Ricardo A. Zayas. 

Moulin Rouge The Musical

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Matthew Murphy

The cast of the original Broadway production of “Moulin Rouge! The Musical” 

Moulin Rouge! The Musical is the winner of 10 2021 Tony Awards including Best Musical, two Drama League Awards including Outstanding Production of a Musical, five Drama Desk Awards and 10 Outer Critics Circle Award Honor citations including New Broadway Musical. 

Tickets are available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket discounts for 10 or more, call the Group Services offices at 714.755.0236. For more information, visit www.moulinrougemusical.com/us-tour/home/.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The arguments have been made, the mailers mailed, the signs posted…and now we vote to decide!

TJ headshot AugIt started months ago. For some, that period has been longer than others. It probably began by surrounding yourself with the people and/or loved ones that said, “You can do this!”

And so, it began. After throwing your name into the ring, it became your message versus your opponent’s. The campaign was on!

Unfortunately, with politics and the quest to win, you probably also discovered pain along the way. Most do. It left you in some ways, exposed.

Let me begin with a couple of thoughts. 

First, I commend all the candidates for entering the fray. You’ve opened yourself up to the praise and criticism of others. Some of those comments were from me. I may have hurt you with some of my thoughts or opinions, while others may have felt a boost in their confidence because of my praise.

But trust me, it was never easy…either way.

I spent many nights going to bed after penning a column, at times deriding someone running for office. It was usually about something they said or did. Those nights caused me many hours of tossing and turning, rather than sleeping soundly. I found myself many times through the process questioning what I was saying.

If you felt pain or that my comments inflicted hurt, I sincerely apologize. I respect and admire everyone I’ve come in contact with along the way. And whether in office or out of office, I look forward to the days ahead where our friendships blossom and we collectively work together to make this community better.

After all, that’s what brought us together here in the first place.

And so, TODAY THE CAMPAIGNS REST. It’s time for the constituents to make their voices heard.

In the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Governments are instituted among (people) deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed.”

Tonight, the polls will close and the arduous task of counting begins. From that, winners will regale in victory…while those losing will be left with their “what ifs.”

Unfortunately, that’s politics. But thank God for a free country…none of us would want it a different way.

It is said that “Losing allows one the opportunity to bounce back stronger than before. It provides the opportunity to evaluate your weaknesses and where you can improve. Failing is the true testament to one’s grit and resiliency and losing says a lot more about someone’s character than winning does.”

But I understand that it’s also more painful.

As the celebrations begin tonight, I join you!

In victory, I ask the winners to offer consolation to their opponents and vice versa. 

It’s time to get to work!

• • •

Newport Mooring Association is encouraging mooring owners and other related stakeholders to attend tomorrow evening’s Harbor Commission meeting (Wednesday, Nov. 9) regarding several issues. 

The issues reported of most concern to the Mooring Association are that “the Harbor Commission will consider changes to the city’s Harbor Code Title 17, giving themselves exclusive rights to manage boats on moorings, and fundamentally changing the way moorings will be configured in the harbor, without City Council approval.”

The NMA “believes that the changes to Title 17 are unnecessary and take away mooring owner rights, and that the mooring reconfiguration plan needs serious review…and Stakeholder meetings are required for both.” 

Concerns are that changes could tighten up mooring rows, putting boats much closer to each other, possibly also impacting homeowner bay views.

The Harbor Commission meets in the City Council Chambers from 5-9 p.m.

The agenda for the meeting and draft minutes from their previous October 12th meeting may be found here.

• • •

Some very, very sad news about one of Newport Beach’s notable residents. Many of you know Peggy Fort. She’s been active for years around the city. She’s successfully run a marketing business. And, in her spare time, she ran marathons.

That’s what makes today’s news even more discouraging.

Peggy has been diagnosed with ALS. It’s a dreaded disease and attacks people indiscriminately. Peggy is still only in her early 50s.

Don Glasgow and his wife, along with other friends, have begun a GoFundMe account to assist Peggy with her rising medical costs. Don knows her well, working with her for years in and around CdM.

According to Don, “Any help is appreciated.” One hundred percent of all funds raised will go directly to Peggy for much-needed caregivers and other essential equipment and medical expenses.

The goal is to raise $90,000.

• • •

CIF-SS playoff action is hot & heavy at Newport Harbor and Corona del Mar high schools in both football and boys water polo.

In football, CdM plays host to Chaparral this Friday, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. in Division 3 action. The Sea Kings come off a 30-23 win over Ayala last Thursday.

Newport Harbor travels to Newbury Park that same evening, also kicking off at 7 p.m. in Division 4 play. The Sailors won last week, 43-17, over Valencia.

In the pool, NHHS, seeded number 2, will play at Harvard-Westlake tomorrow afternoon (Nov. 9) with a 4 p.m. start time. Harvard-Westlake is ranked 3. Both teams play in the Open Division.

The Sailors come off a 14-12 win over league rival Huntington Beach.

CdM in Division 1 action will swim at Orange Lutheran, also tomorrow at 4 p.m. CdM is ranked 2 in Division 1, while Orange Lutheran is 3.

CdM comes off a 13-9 victory over Wilson.

Exciting times at our local schools.

• • •

This week we celebrate Veterans Day. We can never thank those enough who have served for the freedoms we share today.

In honor of Veterans Day, Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris hosted the fourth annual Veterans of the Year ceremony, recognizing six local veterans for their outstanding military service and contributions to fellow veterans and the broader community.

“It was truly an honor to recognize each of these incredible veterans, men and women, who have sacrificed so much in the service of our nation,” said Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris (D-Irvine). “We owe a profound debt of gratitude to the brave men and women who have answered the call of a nation to serve in the United States Armed Forces and fought for our freedom and democracy.”

The 2022 Veterans of the Year awardees are:

Johnny Rojas, U.S. Army – Costa Mesa

Wayne (Russ) Dohrmann, U.S. Army – Huntington Beach

Beverly Daugherty, U.S. Marine Corps – Irvine

Charles J. Quilter II, U.S. Marine Corps – Laguna Beach

Donald R. Forden, U.S. Army – Laguna Woods

Brian Fleming Jr., U.S. Marine Corps – Newport Beach


All-inclusive

All inclusive

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

View homes, golf, oceanfront and sailing…does life offer more?


Cast your vote

Cast your vote

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Falling forward into elections and a new season in Newport Beach


The stuff you find (and learn about yourself) when moving back into the house

By AMY SENK

My past few months have been spent mostly packing up my rental house and getting ready to move back into my real house, which was destroyed in October 2020 after a flood. I wrote about my moving experience when I first came to this rental, and how it revealed my love for hoarding extension cords and bandages and generally just about everything I ever owned. I vowed to purge, and I have, in fits and starts, over the past 22 months.

This past several weeks, though, it’s been bananas. It’s like the opposite of nesting when you’re late in pregnancy. I’m not nesting, I’m tearing everything apart. Throwing things away, giving things away. I’ve driven my high school flute to a music magnet school in Costa Mesa and dropped off book donations at the library more times than I can count.

The stuff boxes

Photos by Amy Senk

Packing in progress

I found an old letter from 1970 that informed my brother that he had been selected to the Rainbow Rockets hockey team. I was shocked that he wanted it, but I mailed it off. The same day, I sent my niece a copy of Billboard magazine that included her birth announcement. A few days after that, I shipped off my son’s infant Michael Jordan jersey from 1998 to another niece who grew up in Chicago and now has a baby of her own. My nephew was not forgotten; I sent his baby girl a beautiful Christmas dress that I spent a sinful amount of money on for my daughter way back when. I remember the day I bought that dress on Balboa Island with my mom and sister. I found an agenda from a 1991 Locust Street Salon that I attended in Kansas City and I shared it with the host. We laughed at how some things never change; the Supreme Court then, as it would be today, was a hot topic. I also found every pay stub I ever had from my days at the Kansas City Star. Why, oh why, would I save those for 30 years?

When you have time and cause to take an inventory of everything you own in the entire world, it’s both an overwhelming hassle and a therapeutic blessing. I wouldn’t wish this experience on anyone, but it’s liberating in its way, and I’m trying hard to focus on the positive.

The stuff foil lids

The Champagne bottle foil lids collection

The stuff matchbooks

The matchbook collection

I’m taking the time to wash and polish things before I pack them so they will be shiny when I unpack. Recently, I dumped two of our “collections” out onto the counter so I could scrub their glass containers – it probably had been years since this had been done. One collection is Champagne bottle foil lids that we’ve saved from most of the bottles we’ve had since we were married in 1993. The other is matchbooks, which seems very old school these days when so few places offer matches. The matches came from many countries and cities, from restaurants long out of business and places nearly forgotten. Some brought weird memories, like the matchbook from an Italian place in Kansas City that I came to know after a murder there that I covered. Others brought back sweet memories, like a place we loved in San Francisco, now closed, where the cocktail lounge was a crashed plane. I spent an evening texting family and friends photos of matchbooks – MacArthur Park in San Francisco where I met my best friend; Balaban’s in the Central West End of St. Louis, where my late father and siblings and I each had our own separate crazy memories.

I’m saving these, but I’ve tossed a lot of other things that previously seemed too important or significant to lose. My old Employee of the Year award, which I move from house to house to house and stick in a drawer. My kids’ report cards. A bathing suit that I loved but was so old that the straps had disintegrated. Why do I live this way, I thought as I filled another trash bin.

The stuff call bell

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The call bell that quelled many arguments

One item that went in the bin was a call bell, a random gift that ended up not wearing that well. It had come in handy in recent years when friends would come over and start to bicker about things like Donald Trump or vaccine boosters. Anyone who wanted to stop the conversation could interrupt with the bell, which somehow lightened the mood and made everyone relax and stop arguing. I asked a therapist friend what she thought, and she agreed it was a good way to end arguments before they went too far. Fingers crossed that I won’t regret getting rid of the bell, because as of today, it’s gone.

Moving is hard, but here’s hoping that nothing gets broken and I’m settled into my new/old home by the holidays. Meanwhile, I must stop writing because the pots and pans won’t pack themselves. 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children. Her son recently graduated with a Master of Arts from the School of Journalism from her alma mater and her daughter is attending Duke University. She is a regular contributor to “Stu News Newport.”


OC Sanitation sewage spill closes bay waters beginning Friday night 

A sewage spill was reported on Friday, Nov. 4, closing bay waters in Newport Beach encompassing all of west Newport Bay channels between 33rd and 43rd streets, and the water area east of the Newport Boulevard bridge downcoast to the Lido Isle bridge and to Pacific Coast Highway and Tustin Avenue. 

The spill was reported and found Friday night after a sewage smell was initially reported. 

Signs were promptly posted showing the closure. OC Sanitation responded and determined they had a broken pipe and made appropriate changes to another main to prevent further leakage. It was contained and cleaned up within hours, according to an OC Sanitation spokesperson.

The original spill was reported at 28,000 but corrected to 10,615 gallons by the Office of Emergency Services.

Before entering waters in the area, residents should visit https://ocbeachinfo.com for updates.


OC Sheriff’s release new rendering to identify 2013 John Doe found off Newport Beach coast

On December 24, 2013, a body was found by a commercial fishing vessel approximately a mile off the coast of Newport Beach. At the time, investigators estimated the man to be a Caucasian or possibly Latin American. However, due to the condition of the body, his ethnicity could not be confirmed.

Despite their investigation and efforts to identify the man, the case went cold.

OC Sheriffs release new rendering

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Courtesy of OCSD

Forensic rendering of John Doe found off Newport Beach coast in 2013

OC Sheriff’s homicide investigators in October 2021 revisited the case and submitted DNA collected from a bone extraction technique to develop a genetic profile on the decedent. Based on this new genetic information, investigators believe the man is primarily of Chinese descent.

Sheriff’s investigators have released an updated forensic rendering of the 2013 John Doe in an effort to identify the man and generate new leads on his homicide case.

The investigators partnered with forensic artist Carl Koppelman to develop an updated rendering based on the genetic profile.

Anyone who recognizes John Doe or may have information on his case is asked to contact the Sheriff’s Homicide Bureau at 714.647.7055, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Anonymous tips may be submitted to OC Crime Stoppers at 855.TIP.OCCS (855.847.6227) or at occcrimestoppers.org.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back Balboa Bay postcard 11.8

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Balboa Bay, Calif. postcard published by Frasher’s Inc., Pomona, Calif.

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Local financial advisor named to board of nonprofit NorthEast of the Well

Longtime Newport Beach resident Lantz Bell, a founder at Bell & Brown Wealth Advisors on Balboa Island, has been named to the board of directors at the nonprofit NorthEast of the Well. The nonprofit has the mission to empower those caught in the cycles of addiction, abuse, incarceration and sexual exploitation/human trafficking. 

Bell, who has been in the investment business for more than 40 years, has volunteered weekly with his wife, Nancy, for the past four years with a group called the “Loaves and Fishes” team. Together they also volunteer at Teen Challenge. 

Local financial advisor Lantz Bell SNN 11.8

Courtesy of NorthEast of the Well

Local resident Lantz Bell named to NorthEast of the Well board of directors

NorthEast of the Well, under the direction of Founder and Executive Director Laura Johnson-Suk, has developed an emphasis to become a safe haven for those trapped in human trafficking. The nonprofit offers hope through the gospel message, belonging through a shared journey and tools that provide a path to independence.

“Nancy and I have been pulled close to Laura Suk and her soldiers and disciples,” Bell said. “First, their commitment to their faith and, second, to their amazing bravery to minister where help is needed and save women from depths that are unimaginable.”

Bell has also volunteered at the Boys & Girls Club of Costa Mesa, along with Newport Harbor High School athletics and Newport Harbor Baseball Association, where he served 10 years as president. 

NorthEast has 17 programs weekly throughout Orange and Los Angeles counties and hosts three gatherings across three different cities, along with leading a Friday night human trafficking street outreach in LA and Orange County every week.

For more information, contact NorthEast of the Well at 949.515.9355.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members: 

This week I had the pleasure of providing a city update to an engaged audience at the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce’s Wake Up! Newport forum. I presented an overview of the city budget, including trends and projections, an update on capital improvement projects and a discussion of current issues. 

Some highlights included:

–An update on city revenues. Thanks to the strength of our local economy and the Newport Beach housing market, all major city revenue sources are up to record levels. Property tax revenue increases reflect higher median home prices and assess value growth. Sales tax revenue has rebounded strongly from a pandemic-related dip, due to higher auto sales, retail sales and restaurant activity. An especially strong comeback can be seen in transient occupancy tax revenues, reflecting higher room rates and increased occupancy in our hotels and short-term rental properties.

–An overview of capital projects. With increased local revenues, federal recovery funds and private donations, the city is investing in several capital improvement projects to upgrade critical infrastructure and improve the quality of life in our community. These projects include the Junior Lifeguard Building, the Library Lecture Hall, Superior Avenue Bridge, Balboa Island drainage and utilities infrastructure upgrades. 

–A discussion of current challenges facing the city, including employee recruitment and retention, the General Plan update, implementation of the recently approved Housing Element update and climate change resiliency. 

For those who missed it, you can view a PDF of my presentation as well as a video below on the city’s YouTube channel.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

2022 General Municipal Election Information

Election Day is today, Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Vote Center and Official Ballot Drop locations can be found at www.newportbeachca.gov/2022election.

City Staff Members Save Distressed Seal Pup

Two staff members from the city’s Public Works Department recently helped save the life of a distressed seal pup they discovered on the beach near the Newport Pier.   

Public Works Supervisor Mike Auger and Crew Chief Jimmy Villa spotted the young seal on October 27, in the early morning. They called the Pacific Marine Mammal Center (PMMC), which advised them to keep the pup warm (they used safety vests) and place it in the back seat of their truck while a rescue team was dispatched. When the PMMC rescue team arrived, the pup was clinging to life.

The city has since been informed that the seal pup (now named Sweet P) is a Northern Fur Seal, which are rare in Newport Beach. Sweet P is still in the ICU, but is expected to make a full recovery and be returned to the wild. 

The city learned of the rescue from a resident who wrote us to describe the incident and commend Auger and Villa for their quick action to rescue the seal pup. 

The Public Was Invited on Saturday, Nov. 5 for NBPD Mobile Café

The Newport Beach Police Department hosted another NBPD Mobile Café on Saturday, Nov. 5 from 12-2 p.m. on the Atomic Creamery patio, 1095 Newport Center Drive, in Fashion Island.

The Mobile Café gives community members an opportunity to meet with officers in an informal setting to discuss community issues and build relationships.

This event was held in partnership with Atomic Creamery, Lemonade and Blaze Pizza, which offered pizza, lemonade and ice cream. 

The Police Department’s Mobile Café events allow for relaxed, one-on-one interaction where community members can ask questions, voice concerns and learn more about the department’s work. 

Strike Impacts Bus Service in Newport Beach, County

Bus service was halted throughout Orange County beginning Thursday, Nov. 3 due to a strike by Orange County Transportation Authority maintenance employees. ACCESS service for those with disabilities continued as usual.

Passengers are asked to check this webpage for the latest updates on OC Bus service, or to call the OCTA Customer Information Center at 714.636.7433. 

City Hotline Provides Updates on Sports Fields, Trail Conditions

With the rainy season upon us, city staff regularly monitors weather forecasts and tracks the impact of rain on the condition of city fields and hiking trails.

Staff evaluates the safety and playability to determine if temporary field closures are necessary. Updates are available by phone through the “mudline” or by text and email.

Text/Email: Subscribe here to receive text and/or email updates from the City of Newport Beach.

MUDLINE: Call 949.718.1860 to hear the latest report. 

Email: Recreation staff at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information, visit the city’s website.

Tickets Now Available for November 16 OASIS Thanksgiving Luncheon

The OASIS Senior Center will be holding its annual Thanksgiving Luncheon at 12 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 16. A traditional Thanksgiving lunch will be catered by 24 Carrots and coffee, drinks and dessert will be included. Come and enjoy holiday-themed music, a raffle drawing and the opportunity to give thanks. Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased in the OASIS Administration office or by calling 949.644.3244.

New State Building Codes to Take Effect in 2023

The City of Newport Beach will be adopting the 2022 California Building Standards Codes this year. The 2022 California codes will become effective on January 1, 2023.

The last business day for projects complying with 2019 California codes to submit plans to the city is Friday, Dec. 23. The Permit Counter will be closed for the holidays, beginning Monday, Dec. 26 through Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2023.

Abandoned Small Vessels to be Auctioned on November 18 at Marina Park

The city will auction abandoned small vessels to the public on Friday, Nov. 18 at 9:30 a.m. at the Marina Park Sailing Center, 1600 W. Balboa Blvd. The auction will include small dinghy vessels, stand-up paddle boards and kayaks. 

Viewing will open at 9 a.m. and the auction will begin at 9:30 a.m. Vessels are sold as is, for cash only, and the minimum bid varies with each vessel. Payment (cash only) is due immediately after the auction. The winning bidders are responsible for removing their vessels by 5 p.m., Nov. 18. 

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

Last week the Be Well team:

–Assisted an older adult with suicidal ideations. 

–Responded to an older couple’s home to address memory loss and confusion issues. The couple accepted resources from the team to follow up with a care plan.

–Transported one person to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for an intake appointment.

–Transported one person to the Be Well sobering station for treatment.

–Transported nine people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Continued to shelter people. Twenty people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter. 

–Transported a client to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for an intake appointment.

–Assisted an older veteran with an application to low-income senior veteran’s housing in Newport Beach. The man was awarded a housing voucher through the Veterans’ Administration.

–Completed referrals to the Yale Navigation Center’s wait list.

–Collaborated with the CalOptima Medical Response Team to provide treatment for an older adult experiencing homelessness.

–Transported a client to Share Our Selves to enroll into its medical services for care.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

This Week’s Events

Wednesday, Nov. 9

Harbor Commission Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 5 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 10

Zoning Administrator Meeting

Zoom – 10 a.m.

Finance Committee Meeting

Civic Center Community Room

100 Civic Center Drive – 3 p.m.

City Arts Commission Meeting

Central Library

1000 Avocado Ave. – 5 p.m.

Friday, Nov. 11

Veterans Day Holiday Closure

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, Nov. 4 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

Harbor 20/Finn Winter Series 2022-2023

November 6

Finn (4 sailed)

1 Marshall, NHYC, Total 9

2 Downing, NHYC, Total 10

3 Kennedy, NHYC, Total 13a

4 Ramming, NHYC, Total 18 

5 Martin, MBYC, Total 21

6 Kinney, NHYC/Oasis, Total 24

7 Dwan, NHYC, Total 27

8 Arrigo, NHYC, Total 28

9 Wood, NHYC, Total 33

10 Yonkers, NHYC, Total 36 

11 Connally, NHYC, Total 41

Harbor 20 A (4 sailed)

1 Bose/Elliot, BCYC, Total 10

2 K. Wiese/A. Wiese, NHYC, Total 12

3 B. Bissell/P. Bissell, NHYC, Total 13

4 Madigan, NHYC, Total 14 

5 Allen/Helias, NHYC, Total 21

6 Conzelman/Thompson, NHYC/Oasis, Total 23

7 Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 26

8 E. Kimball/A. Costello Kimball, ABYC, Total 26

9 Gloege/Hause, NHYC, Total 35

Harbor 20 B (4 sailed)

1 McDonald, NHYC, Total 5

2 Corkett, NHYC, Total 11

3 Watanabe, UCISA, Total 16

4 D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 17 

5 Fuller, NHYC, Total 22

6 K. Reed/T. Reed, ABYC/Oasis, Total 24

7 H. Duncan/W. Duncan, NHYC, Total 26

8 B. Richley/N. Richley, NHYC, Total 32

9 Campbell, BYC, Total 33

10 Hurlimann/Fischbacher, Scuttlebutt, Total 34

Harbor 20 C (4 sailed)

1 K. Whitney/J. Whitney, NHYC, Total 6

2 Somers/Barnes, NHYC, Total 7

3 M. Bartell/R. Bartell, BYC, Total 13

4 Wood/Leason, EYC, Total 14 

5 Ibbetson/Walters, SYC, Total 19

6 Hall/Crary, NHYC/Oasis, Total 19

7 Brooks/Allen, NHYC, Total 19

BYC 

2022 CHOC Regatta (PHRF)

November 6

PHRF A Division (Distance 8.6)

1 Heartbeat 4, J124, Brewer Jr., NHYC

   Elapsed 1:47:49, Corrected 1:42:48

2 Table 9, C&C30, Newman, BYC

   Elapsed 1:51:44, Corrected 1:46:34

3 Carbon Footprint, Rogers46, Devling, BYC

   Elapsed 1:42:37, Corrected 1:47:04

PHRF B Division (Distance 8.6)

1 Doubletime, Andrews 36, Andrews/Lynch, BYC

   Elapsed 1:46:05, Corrected 1:37:03

2 Legacy, J105, Dougherty., NHYC/LIYC 

   Elapsed 1:50:33, Corrected 1:40:14

3 XLR8, Bene36.7, Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:58:36, Corrected 1:46:59

PHRF C Division (Distance 5.4)

1 Radical Departure, Bene25, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 1:17:07, Corrected 1:06:51

2 Altheris, C&C35, Booth, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:22:01, Corrected 1:11:13

3 Violetta, Davidson34, Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:22:30, Corrected 1:13:52

4 Kaizen, Santana 35, Camerini, UCISA

   Elapsed 1:33:42, Corrected 1:22:54

5 Stella Maris, C&C38, Barry, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:40:37, Corrected 1:29:54

PHRF D Division (Distance 5.4)

1 Campaign II, C&C34, Glackin, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:40:09, Corrected 1:26:39

2 Daydream, Pearson, Fischbeck, BYC

   Elapsed 1:54:18, Corrected 1:37:12

3 Tui, Ericson32, Boyle, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:51:16, Corrected 1:37:46

4 Holokai, K41, McElfresh, ALYC 

   Elapsed 1:53:37, Corrected 1:39:02

BYC 

2022-2023 Sunkist Series (PHRF)

November 6

PHRF A Division (Distance 8.6)

1 D19, 1D35, Bailey, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:43:03, Corrected 1:37:28

2 Heartbeat 4, J124, Brewer Jr., NHYC

   Elapsed 1:47:49, Corrected 1:42:48

3 Table 9, C&C30, Newman, BYC

   Elapsed 1:51:44, Corrected 1:46:34

4 Carbon Footprint, Rogers46, Devling, BYC

   Elapsed 1:42:37, Corrected 1:47:04

PHRF B Division (Distance 8.6)

1 Doubletime, Andrews 36, Andrews/Lynch, BYC

   Elapsed 1:46:05, Corrected 1:37:03

2 Legacy, J105, Dougherty., NHYC/LIYC 

   Elapsed 1:50:33, Corrected 1:40:14

3 Problem Child, B32, Rossen, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:49:36, Corrected 1:40:51

4 XLR8, Bene36.7, Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:58:36, Corrected 1:46:59

PHRF C Division (Distance 5.4)

1 Radical Departure, Bene25, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 1:17:07, Corrected 1:06:51

2 Altheris, C&C35, Booth, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:22:01, Corrected 1:11:13

3 Violetta, Davidson34, Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:22:30, Corrected 1:13:52

4 Rhythm, C&C32, Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 1:23:56, Corrected 1:15:18

5 Kaizen, Santana 35, Camerini, UCISA

   Elapsed 1:33:42, Corrected 1:22:54

6 Stella Maris, C&C38, Barry, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:40:37, Corrected 1:29:54

7 Pyxis, Cat425, Jessup, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:46:24, Corrected 1:36:41

8 Buena Vista, RS21, Green, ALYC

   Elapsed 1:58:06, Corrected 1:47:50

PHRF D Division (Distance 5.4)

1 Horsefeathers, Ericson35, Fuller, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:31:37, Corrected 1:18:07

2 Campaign II, C&C34, Glackin, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:40:09, Corrected 1:26:39

3 Silk, Harbor25, Hanscom, SYC

   Elapsed 1:43:00, Corrected 1:27:37

4 Daydream, Pearson, Fischbeck, BYC

   Elapsed 1:54:18, Corrected 1:37:12

5 Tui, Ericson32, Boyle, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:51:16, Corrected 1:37:46

6 Holokai, K41, McElfresh, ALYC 

   Elapsed 1:53:37, Corrected 1:39:02

BYC 

2022 CHOC Regatta (Inside Classes)

November 5

Harbor 20 A Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Aquavit, Camerini/Detwiler, UCISA, Total 6

2 Shana’s Secret, Conzelman/Thompson, NHYC, Total 7

3 Blue Skies, G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 9

4 Ping, K. Wiese/A. Wiese, NHYC, Total 9 

5 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 14

6 Hula Girl, Hill/Manning, BCYC/Oasis, Total 18

Harbor 20 B Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Wood In It Be Nice, K. Reed/T. Reed, ABYC, Total 5

2 Sail Dates, Corkett/Weiss, NHYC, Total 7

3 Spirit, P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 9

4 Whit’s End, Whitney/Karr, NHYC, Total 10

5 Sail N’ Win, Fuller/Drever, NHYC, Total 14

Harbor 20 C Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Stop Making Sense, Barnes, ALYC, Total 6

2 Adios, P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC, Total 8

3 Rhapsody In Blue, M. Bartell/R. Bartell, BYC, Total 9

4 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 13 

5 Chloe, Delis, BYC, Total 13

6 Simpatica, Kimme/Carlson, BYC/Oasis, Total 17

7 Tryst, Wood/Leason, EYC, Total 18

Thistle Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 2

2 Simmons/A. Patton/G. Patton, BYC, Total 4

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 6

ILCA Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Andrews, BYC, Total 4

2 Hemphill, BYC, Total 4

3 Bonsager, BYC, Total 6

4 Cook, BYC, Total 8

5 Vandervort, BYC, Total 8

6 G. Tilly, BYC, Total 13

7 Luttrell, BYC, Total 13

8 M. Tilly, BYC, Total 16

Lido 14 A Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Papadopoulos/Corsi, WSA-OC, Total 2

2 McRae, ABYC, Total 4

3 Lange/Mulcaire, ALYC, Total 6

4 Boudreaux/Aldaco, BYC, Total 8

5 Long/Biram, BYC, Total 10

Lido 14 B Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 3

Adult Sabot A Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Heavrin, ABYC, Total 3

2 Finkboner, MBYC, Total 7

3 Lynch, BYC, Total 8

4 Coon, MBYC, Total 9

5 Acosta, DPYC, Total 11

6 Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 12

7 Luttrell, BYC, Total 13

8 Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 15

9 Ungerland, BYC, Total 16

10 Kalscheur, BYC, Total 18

11 Reilly, BYC, Total 22

12 Allison, BYC, Total 26

Adult Sabot B Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Power, ABYC, Total 3

2 Meany, BYC, Total 3

3 DesCombes, SSC, Total 8

4 Ware, SSC, Total 8

5 Harmon, BYC, Total 8

6 Evans, BYC, Total 12

7 Lindsey, BYC, Total 16

BYC 

2022-2023 Sunkist Series (Inside Classes)

November 5

Harbor 20 A Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Aquavit, Camerini/Detwiler, UCISA, Total 6

2 Shana’s Secret, Conzelman/Thompson, NHYC, Total 7

3 Blue Skies, G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 9

4 Ping, K. Wiese/A. Wiese, NHYC, Total 10

5 Downhill, Gloege/Hall, NHYC, Total 16 

6 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 16

7 Hula Girl, Hill/Manning, BCYC/Oasis, Total 20

8 Only Child, Bose/Elliot, BCYC, Total 30

9 Dragon Lady, Kimball/Costello, ABYC, Total 30

Harbor 20 B Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Wood In It Be Nice, K. Reed/T. Reed, ABYC, Total 6

2 12, McDonald/Stemler, NHYC, Total 8

3 Sail Dates, Corkett/Weiss, NHYC, Total 9

4 Spirit, P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 11

5 Whit’s End, Whitney/Karr, NHYC, Total 12

6 Sail N’ Win, Fuller/Drever, NHYC, Total 17

Harbor 20 C Fleet  (3 sailed)

1 Whatever, Fischbacher/Hurlimann, BSSB, Total 7

2 Stop Making Sense, Barnes, ALYC, Total 8

3 Adios, P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC, Total 10

4 Rhapsody In Blue, M. Bartell/R. Bartell, BYC, Total 11

5 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 16 

6 Chloe, Delis, BYC, Total 16

7 Simpatica, Kimme/Carlson, BYC/Oasis, Total 20

8 Tryst, Wood/Leason, EYC, Total 21

9 SkipHer, Waniek, BYC, Total 26

Thistle Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 2

2 Simmons/A. Patton/G. Patton, BYC, Total 4

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 6

ILCA Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Andrews, BYC, Total 4

2 Hemphill, BYC, Total 4

3 Bonsager, BYC, Total 6

4 Cook, BYC, Total 8

5 Vandervort, BYC, Total 8

6 G. Tilly, BYC, Total 13

7 Luttrell, BYC, Total 13

8 M. Tilly, BYC, Total 16

Lido 14 A Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Papadopoulos/Corsi, WSA-OC, Total 2

2 McRae, ABYC, Total 4

3 Lange/Mulcaire, ALYC, Total 6

4 Boudreaux/Aldaco, BYC, Total 8

5 Long/Biram, BYC, Total 10

Lido 14 B Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Waniek/Cain, BYC, Total 3

2 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 3

3 Reno/Gordon, ABYC, Total 6

Adult Sabot A Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Heavrin, ABYC, Total 3

2 Finkboner, MBYC, Total 7

3 Lynch, BYC, Total 8

4 Coon, MBYC, Total 9

5 Acosta, DPYC, Total 11

6 Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 12

7 Luttrell, BYC, Total 13

8 Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 15

9 Ungerland, BYC, Total 16

10 Kalscheur, BYC, Total 18

11 Reilly, BYC, Total 23

12 Foreman, BYC, Total 28

12 Allison, BYC, Total 28

Adult Sabot B Fleet  (2 sailed)

1 Power, ABYC, Total 3

2 Meany, BYC, Total 3

3 DesCombes, SSC, Total 8

4 Ware, SSC, Total 8

5 Harmon, BYC, Total 8

6 Evans, BYC, Total 12

7 Lindsey, BYC, Total 16

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The Pendry Newport Beach is on the horizon, complete with property redesign and highly anticipated social club

By GARY SHERWIN

If you are casually driving by the former Fashion Island Hotel, everything looks seemingly normal. The sign remains up and the building looks pretty much unchanged from when it closed more than two and a half years ago at the start of the pandemic.

But in this case, looks are deceiving. If you look at the side of the hotel, you’ll see all the window coverings gone and glimpses of construction personnel busy at work in the rooms. At the entrance of the property, almost a dozen trucks are parked by the fountain and the lobby is a beehive of activity.

Almost imperceptibly, a transformation is underway.

Since it was announced in February that Newport Beach-based Eagle Four Partners had purchased the hotel from the Irvine Company and would convert it to the Pendry Newport Beach, there have been lots of questions.

Gary Sherwin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

The inquiries certainly haven’t been about the ownership. Eagle Four have proven themselves as superlative hospitality leaders in the community. With Eagle Four’s purchase (along with fellow Newport Beach-based Lyon Living) of the former Marriott Newport Beach and Spa in 2020, which opened this summer as the reinvented VEA Newport Beach, and their existing ownership of the Balboa Bay Resort and the Newport Beach Country Club, they have brought a quality-oriented mindset to all their projects that also includes developments in other cities as well.

What everyone seems to want to know about is what exactly is the Pendry brand and what will the hotel look like when it’s finished? And what about the rumored Social Club that has local business executives all abuzz?

The Pendry is a relatively new lifestyle hotel concept with seven properties nationally and is part of Montage Hotels and Resorts, with its flagship property just down the road in Laguna Beach (recently rumored to being acquired by billionaire Tillman Fertitta for $650 million). Pendry just opened its newest property in Washington, D.C., and has three more planned for next year, in addition to Newport Beach, as well as more to be announced this coming year.

It is run by Michael Fuerstman, whose father Alan was the brainchild behind the luxury hospitality franchise Montage. Mike brings a wonderful creative vision to the projects that will be in full display with our new Pendry.

The company has its corporate headquarters in Irvine and is focusing on developments in luxury-oriented cities. The brand was created to be a fashionable, urbane version of the Montage brand. 

The company’s philosophy is “Know thyself,” with the same standards for service excellence as its sister resorts. They encourage staff to act as if they were hosts in their own homes welcoming guests.

“The original lifestyle brands were less about service and more about creating a scene,” Alan Fuerstman said in a recent interview. “We saw a void in the market that Pendry could fill by marrying a culture of extraordinary service and still retain the energy, vibrancy and nightlife of lifestyle.”

If you are in the West Hollywood area, stop by their property on the Sunset Strip and you’ll get an idea of the concept, which brings art, glamour and style together in a unique way. That property has the feel of a sophisticated cosmopolitan hotel with more than a touch of a British vibe. 

The inaugural Pendry opened in downtown San Diego close to Petco Park and is hailed as the best hotel in San Diego weaving in some incredible food and beverage offerings by renowned restaurateur and entertainment guru Andy Masi who is rumored to be bringing his talents to Pendry Newport Beach.

Let’s start at what won’t change at the Newport Beach property. The hotel will remain at 295 rooms with 20,000 square feet of meeting space. Hospitality leaders often refer to a hotel that has “good bones,” meaning that the layout, service bays and dining, bar space works well operationally. This place definitely has it, which is a tribute to the Irvine Company who built it 36 years ago as a Four Seasons Hotel.

The challenge was to reinvent it for a new more discerning visitor. Luxury has morphed in the last decade with consumers opting for less fussiness and pretentiousness but with greater design, comfortable rooms, excellent food and beverages as well as a fashionable atmosphere that encourages peop